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SA Dental Service
Year Book  12-13





SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 1

Contents
2 Executive Director Report

3 Strategic Directions 

4 Vision

4 Values

5 Organisational Chart 

6 Statewide Dental Services

7 Adelaide Dental Hospital

8 Health Promotion Division

8 Policy and Programs Division

9 Corporate Services Division

10 Report on the implementation of the 
 SA Dental Service Strategic Plan 2011-2016 

22 Freedom of information
 
24 Adelaide Dental Hospital statistics 

26 School Dental Service statistics
 
29 Community Dental Service statistics
 
32 Aboriginal Dental Scheme statistics
 
33 Human Resource statistics
 
36 Financial Statements



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13

Executive Director s 
Report 2012/13
SA Dental Service has developed its own suite of 
strategic outcomes 2011-2016 within the framework 
of the SA Health Care Plan and the Department 
for Health and Ageing s Strategic Directions. These 
SA Dental Service Strategic outcomes formed the 
framework for activities during the 2012-13 financial 
year. Highlights of the year include:

&gt; A balanced budget for at least the 12th year in 
 a row.

&gt; Further expansion of the Aboriginal Liaison 
Program connecting Aboriginal communities with 
mainstream public dental services. As a result 
there was a further 9.4% increase in the number 
of Aboriginal children treated in SA Dental 
Service facilities and a 4% increase in the number 
of Aboriginal adults. This builds on significant 
increases in previous years.

&gt; A further 4.5% increase in the number of 
preschool children treated in the School Dental 
Service reflecting a focus on reducing the 
incidence of early childhood caries. 

&gt; A reduction in the number of children waiting for 
treatment under general anaesthetic from 1,212 
children waiting an average 20.4 months to 565 
children waiting an average of 4.6 months.

&gt; A significant reduction in the number of children 
who are more than 6 months overdue for their 
dental check-up from 15.6% to 9.4% including 
10% fewer children assessed as high risk being 
overdue. 

&gt; A significant reduction in waiting lists for 
restorative dental treatment of eligible adults from 
16 months in June 2012 to 11.5 months in June 
2013. The waiting time for dentures decreased 
from 14.8 months in June 2012 to 11.4 months 
in June 2013. (However, the average waiting time 
for specialist dental services at the Adelaide Dental 
Hospital increased from 14.4 months to 15.6 
months at June 2013.)

&gt; In line with oral health s integral role within 
general health, the number of public dental 
patients receiving short interventions for tobacco 
cessation increased once again, this year by a 
further 33%. 

&gt; Sustainment of excellent outcomes in a range of 
indicators of clinical quality including retreatment 
rates for a range of services.

&gt; Implementation of the National Partnership 
Agreement on Treating More Public Patients 
in May 2013 which had immediate impact on 
waiting lists.

&gt; Implementation of the  Building Better Oral 
Communities  project.

&gt; Involvement in the development of a National Oral 
Health Promotion Plan.

&gt; Implementation of a Specialist fee for service 
scheme for endodontic care.

&gt; Roll out of Motivational Interviewing training for 
all clinical staff.

&gt; Construction of a new 6 chair Aged Care clinic at 
the ADH.

&gt; Commencement of involvement in conducting the 
National Child Oral Health Survey.

&gt; Commencement in January 2014 of the 
Commonwealth Voluntary Dentist Graduate Year 
Program with one graduate selected for SA Dental 
Service.

Martin Dooland
Executive Director
Statewide Services

Page 2 SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 3

Strategic Directions
SA Dental Service Strategic Outcomes for 2011-2016

Strategic Outcome 1   The oral health of the South Australian population is improved and oral health 
inequalities are reduced with a particular focus on:

&gt; people living in rural and remote areas
&gt; Aboriginal people
&gt; homeless people
&gt; people in Supported Residential Facilities
&gt; older people living in the community and in residential care
&gt; pre-school children 
&gt; people with chronic diseases
&gt; migrants with a refugee background

Strategic Outcome 2   Oral health is sustainably integrated into the wider health system.

Strategic Outcome 3   The community and private dental sector are involved in the planning, design and 
monitoring of public dental services.

Strategic Outcome 4   SA Dental Service is active in the development of public oral health policy at a State 
level and National level.

Strategic Outcome 5   Population based health promotion underpins all of SA Dental Service Programs and 
clinical programs have an increased focus on prevention and early intervention.

Strategic Outcome 6   Client focused quality systems drive improved clinical and non clinical services which are 
demonstrably efficient and effective.

Strategic Outcome 7   SA Dental Service is an employer of choice, has sufficient skilled clinical and non clinical 
workforce and is making full and flexible use of its capabilities.

Strategic Outcome 8   SA Dental Service is an active partner with the dental tertiary education and 
research sectors.

Strategic Outcome 9   Public dental infrastructure supports the provision of contemporary public dental 
services and is integrated with other health services wherever possible.



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 4

SA Dental Service Vision
Good oral health is essential for overall health and well being. A healthy mouth has a positive impact on 
physical, mental and social well being, hence healthy smile - healthy life.  

Mission
Working with the community to enable South Australians to achieve better oral health and well being through

&gt; health promotion
&gt; timely dental treatment with a focus on prevention and early intervention
&gt; support for education and research.

Values



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 5

Organisational Structure
SA Dental Service 

Chief Executive Officer
Central Adelaide Local

Health Network

Executive Director
Statewide Services

General 
Manager
Statewide

Dental 
Services

Director 
Policy and 
Programs

Director 
Health 

Promotion

Manager 
Corporate 

Service 
Statewide 
Services

General 
Manager
Adelaide 
Dental 

Hospital

Geoff Franklin Anne Pak-Poy Janet Weeks Christine Morris Shelley Crooks

  School Dental 
Service 

  Community 
Dental Service

  Private Schemes
   (purchasing)
  Remote Dental 

Services
  Clinical Attraction 

and Retention

  Specialist Services
  Teaching clinics
  Special Needs 

Services
  Infection Control

  Safety and 
Quality

  Service and 
Capital Planning

  Client Relations
  Evaluation and 

Research
  Programs
  Workforce 

Development 
(clinical)

  Health Promotion
  Communication

  Corporate 
Administration

  Risk Management



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13

Statewide Dental 
Services Division
Statewide Dental Services provide dental services 
to children and eligible adults through two core 
programs, the School Dental Service and the 
Community Dental Service. Special arrangements 
apply for those who may be particularly vulnerable 
to the consequences of poor oral health including 
preschool children, Aboriginal clients, clients 
with mental health issues and the aged. Those 
arrangements may include priority access to care 
and/or free care. 

In addition to services provided by qualified 
clinicians, general dental services in School and 
Community Dental Services are also provided by 
undergraduate dental students and students in 
the Bachelor of Oral Health Program. School and 
Community Dental Service staff are involved in the 
clinical supervision and training of undergraduate 
students.

School Dental Service

The School Dental Service offers a comprehensive 
dental care program to all children up until their 
18th birthday. This care is free of charge to all pre-
school children.  It is also free for primary school 
and high school students with a school card, or who 
have or are dependents of a Centrelink cardholder. 
All other primary school and high school students 
are required to pay a small fee for each general 
course of care they receive. Those aged between 
12-17 years who are eligible may present their 
Medicare Teen Dental Voucher to receive their care.

Care is provided by teams of Dentists, Dental 
Therapists and Dental Assistants who work from a 
network of 46 clinics and mobile vans throughout 
the state. Many of these clinics are located within 
Primary Schools while others are mobile services to 
remote locations such as Leigh Creek, Nepabunna 
and Marree. The advent of the GP Plus and GP Super 
clinics at Elizabeth, Modbury, Marion and Noarlunga 
has resulted in the closure of many small, old, part 
time clinics in these areas. 

Private dentists provide school dental services, under 
a capitation agreement, to approximately 2100 
children who reside in areas remote from a school 
dental clinic. No client fees apply for these services. 

General Anaesthetics are required for some young 
children with extensive oral health care needs 
and these are provided both at local hospitals by 
SA Dental Service dentists and under contractual 
arrangements with the Department of Paediatric 
Dentistry at the Women s and Children s Hospital. 

Children are examined on a regular basis according 
to their individual needs and receive a full range 
of preventive and treatment based services. These 
services are provided mainly by Dental Therapists 
who work under the general supervision of a 
Dentist and in accordance with their conditions of 
employment, supported by Dental Assistants.

Community Dental Service

The Community Dental Service provides emergency 
and routine dental services to adults who are the 
holders of a Centrelink concession card. Urgent 
needs are usually attended to promptly, while 
routine care is provided after recourse to a waiting 
list. Average waiting periods reduced to12 months 
during the year.

The majority of care is provided by dentists who 
operate from a network of 37 clinics and mobile 
services located throughout the state, supplemented 
by private dentists through a range of schemes such 
as the Emergency Dental Scheme, General Dental 
Scheme, Pensioner Denture Scheme, Prisoner Dental 
Scheme and the Aboriginal Dental Scheme. Client 
fees apply for most services but some preventive 
items are provided at no cost. 

Two Domiciliary Dental teams operate in the 
Adelaide metropolitan area and provide services to 
homebound people in private homes and Residential 
Aged Care Facilities. 

Page 6



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13

Remote Dental Services

The Remote Dental Service team responsibilities include:
&gt;  Strategic planning to meet service needs in remote 

areas, in particular for Aboriginal communities
&gt; Contractual arrangements with private dentists 

to provide services in remote locations such as 
Coober Pedy

&gt; Visiting services by SA Dental Service staff, for 
example, services to children in Ceduna

&gt; Output or other funded services through 
Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services 
such as at Coober Pedy and Yalata.

During the year, services at Oodnadatta, Leigh Creek, 
Nepabunna and Marree were either introduced or 
enhanced with the assistance of Commonwealth 
infrastructure funding which enabled the building of 
a dental clinic at Oodnadatta and the refurbishment 
of a dental truck.

Schemes Unit

This team has a range of responsibilities for 
predominantly externally sourced services including:
&gt; The management of private practice schemes 

including Emergency Dental Scheme, General 
Dental Scheme, Aboriginal Dental Scheme, 
Pensioner Dental Scheme, Capitation, Prisoner 
Dental Scheme

&gt; Purchasing of dental services including schedules 
for services provided through private practitioners

&gt; Clinical quality issues relating to the outsourced 
provision of oral health services.

The Adelaide Dental 
Hospital Division
The Adelaide Dental Hospital (ADH) is one of the 
two service provision arms of SA Dental Service 
and is a core component of the SA Government s 
approach to providing public dental care. The ADH 
fulfils a number of essential roles including:
&gt; the only dental teaching hospital in South 

Australia that provides facilities, management and 
staff to support the training of undergraduate and 
postgraduate students of the School of Dentistry 
of the University of Adelaide 

&gt; the sole statewide referral centre for specialist and 
complex oral health care services

&gt; provision of general and specialist public dental 
services, continuing education, some specialist and 
treatment planning advice to SA Dental Service 
professional staff.  The provision of a specialist network 
and advice supports the acute medical sector in SA.

Page 7

General and emergency dental care is largely 
provided by undergraduate dental and oral health 
students under the supervision of SA Dental Service.

Specialist services in the ADH are provided by 
a combination of staff and visiting specialists, 
academic staff of the University and significantly by 
postgraduate students in specialty training programs.

The range of specialty services provided include:
&gt; oral and maxillofacial surgery
&gt; orthodontics 
&gt; endodontics
&gt; periodontics 
&gt; fixed and removable prosthodontics 
&gt; special needs dentistry. 

In addition to managing the operation of the ADH, 
and providing patient care, staff  are involved in the 
clinical supervision and training of undergraduate 
and postgraduate students. Academic staff of the 
Dental School provide patient care as honorary 
appointees to the Hospital, or indirectly by the 
supervision of students in clinical programs.

Because of its historic relationship with the Royal 
Adelaide Hospital (RAH), the ADH provides dental 
services to inpatients of the RAH and operates 
an after hours on-call service through the RAH 
Accident and Emergency Department. All patients 
requiring general anaesthesia for dental or oral 
and maxillofacial surgery procedures are admitted 
and treated in RAH theatres.  Dental technicians 
attached to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit 
provide maxillofacial prostheses on referral from 
metropolitan hospitals.  



In addition to providing specialist support to dentists 
in SA Dental Service Community and School Dental 
Services, the ADH also accepts a limited number of 
referrals from the private sector. These patients are 
accepted in circumstances where the resources of 
the Hospital are better able to accommodate the 
needs of particularly complex or difficult cases.

Health Promotion Division
The Health Promotion Division is focussed on the 
provision of strategic advice on health promotion 
and quality support to SA Dental Service staff, our 
clients and consumers and the wider community.  
The division has a strategic approach to ensure that 
health promotion is integrated into all SA Dental 
Service programs and projects and to actively 
promote the integration of oral health into overall 
health and wellbeing.  

The Division works in partnership with our staff 
and other agencies to promote health, prevent oral 
diseases and provide health information. We support 
oral health as an integral part of general health 
through the development of healthy public policy 
and organisational development. We assist our staff 
to develop local health promotion initiatives through 
skill development and the provision of oral health 
resources.

Health Promotion Division has responsibility for:
&gt;  promoting an organisational commitment to 

policies and practices that incorporate the health 
promotion principles including those of the 
Ottawa Charter and Social Determinants of Health

&gt;  supporting staff to develop and implement health 
promotion into their clinical practice through 
health promotion practice guidelines

&gt;  promoting oral health as an integral part of 
general health by supporting the development of 
health promotion and prevention policies, healthy 
public policy and organisational practices

&gt;  developing quality health information and 
resources to support staff to increase awareness 
and to promote oral health in the community

&gt;  developing strategic partnerships that increase 
oral health knowledge and practice

&gt;  managing internal and external communication 
strategies to ensure consistency of message and 
branding

&gt;  staff culture surveys
&gt;  implementing population health promotion 

programs to improve oral health.

Policy and Programs 
Division
The Policy and Programs Division has a strategic, 
organisation wide focus, and provides leadership 
to, and works collaboratively with, all SA Dental 
Service divisional teams to challenge and support 
service improvement and program development.  
As a Division, Policy and Programs promotes public 
oral health principles, drives quality and service 
improvement and provides high level advice and 
leadership with respect to:
&gt; Strategic and operational planning
&gt; Safety, quality and clinical risk management

Page 8 SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13



Page 9

&gt; Client relations and the management of consumer 
feedback

&gt; Program planning and development
&gt; Capital and infrastructure planning and 

development
&gt; Program Evaluation and Research.

Policy and Programs Division comprises the 
following Units:
&gt; Quality, Patient Safety, Clinical Risk and Workforce 

Development 
&gt; Client Relations 
&gt; Service Planning 
&gt; Evaluation and Research.
 
Policy and Programs Division leads service 
improvement by:
&gt; Promoting a culture of safety and quality as well 

as clinical learning.
 -  Engaging with staff to positively influence the 

quality and safety culture of the organisation 
in recognition that improvement has to be an 
integral part of what the organisation does.

&gt; Developing Programs
 - Exploration and development of new and 

innovative models of care
 - Implementation of the SA Health Care Plan, 

State and National Oral Health Plans
 - Identification of at risk population groups and 

their oral health needs
 - Development of programs for at risk population 

groups.

SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13

&gt; Seeking and securing capital funding to support 
the provision of public oral health services

 - Identification of infrastructure requirements
 - Pursuit of capital funding opportunities
 - Oversight of capital developments

&gt; Evaluating programs and organisational clinical 
performance

 - Provision of program analysis and reporting
 - Development of management information  

systems 
 - Conducting and/or overseeing evaluation and 

research projects
 - Supporting research involving SA Dental Service 

clients and staff
&gt; Promoting evidence-based approaches to service 

and program delivery
&gt; Promoting client-centred approaches to enhance 

service quality
 - Promoting and facilitating good consumer 

practice at the interface between staff and 
clients

 - Developing and promoting mechanisms to 
facilitate effective management of consumer 
feedback

 - Monitoring consumer experience.

Corporate Services Division
The Corporate Services Division provides non-
clinical support services to SA Dental Service for 
the management of risk, corporate records, and 
building assets, as well as policy and procedure 
administration, contract development, business 
management and executive support services.

The Division leads strategic work for SA Dental 
Service via strong links with consolidated support 
services such as eHealth Systems, Procurement and 
Supply Chain Management, Biomedical Engineering, 
Corporate Finance and Property Management, all of 
which report under SA Health. 

Other non-clinical support services are provided by 
SA Health staff out posted to Central Adelaide LHN 
who work closely with SA Dental Service in areas 
such as Human Resources, Finance and Business 
Advisory Service, and Worker Health and Safety. 
Links are also maintained with Shared Services SA 
who provide Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable 
and Payroll functions under the Department for 
Premier and Cabinet.



Page 10

In 2012/13 1331 children attended SDS an increase 
of 2.3% compared to 2011/12 and 113% increase 
from 2010/11

Aboriginal Oral Health

The general and oral health of the Aboriginal and 
Torres Strait Islander population of South Australia 
is significantly worse than the total population. As 
a consequence, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 
oral health has been identified as a priority in South 
Australia s Oral Health Plan 2010   2017 and an 
action area in Australia s National Oral Health Plan 
2004 - 2013. The South Australian Dental Service 
secured funding through the Council of Australian 
Governments (COAG) for the financial years 2011-
2013. The first round of funding has ensured that 
strategies to increase access to mainstream dental 
services for families, early childhood, teenagers 
and pregnant women was available in addition to 
resources to support oral health messages specifically 
for Aboriginal people.

 

Report on the 
Implementation of the 
SA Dental Service Strategic 
Plan - Progress as at June 2013
Strategic Outcome 1 

After continuous deterioration since the late 1990s, 
the amount of dental decay in children fell for the 
fourth year in a row.  The 12 year-old mean DMFT is 
now 0.84, compared with 1.05 in 2008.

Population Oral Health Program 

The Population Oral Health Program aims to increase 
the number of preschool children attending dental 
services. In 2012/2013, 2437 children were referred 
to the Program. A total of 8878 preschool children 
had been referred to the program by 30 June 2013.

Referrals were made by 591 allied health 
professionals, up from 510 to June 2012; 71% of 
external referrals were made by CaFHS nurses in 
2012/13 and 42% of children referred were aged 
under 4 at the time of referral. 

Aboriginal Health Workers were trained to screen 
preschoolers for tooth decay and were asked to offer 
all Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islander preschool 
children a referral. Referrals made by Aboriginal 
Health Workers increased from just under 2% in 
2011/12, to 10% in 2012/2013. Of the total referrals 
received in 2012/2013, 13% of referred children 
identified as being of Aboriginal and or Torres Strait 
Islander descent. 

Improved health and reduced health 
inequalities

12 year old Mean DMFT SA SDS
1.20

1.10

1.00

0.90

0.80

0.70

0.60

0.50

0.40

19
93

19
94

19
95

19
96

19
97

19
98

19
99

20
00

20
01

20
02

20
03

20
04

20
05

20
06

20
07

20
08

20
09

20
10

20
11

20
12

Number of New Children seen under the
 Lift the Lip  program by SDS

1400

1200

1000

  800

  600

   400

  200

JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
      0

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 11

Aboriginal ADULT PATIENTS
Aboriginal Liaison Program

2400

2800
2600

2200
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
  800
  600
  400
  200

JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
      0

2010/11

2009/10

2008/09

2007/08

2011/12

2012/13

Aboriginal ADULT PATIENTS
4500

4000

3500

3000

2000

2500

  1500

  1000

  500

JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
      0

2011/12

2012/13

2010/11
2009/10
2008/09
2007/08
2006/07
2005/06

Aboriginal CHILD PATIENTS

4000

4500

3500

3000

2500

2000

1500

 1000

  500

JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
      0

2011/12
2012/13

2010/11
2009/10
2008/09
2007/08
2006/07

2005/06

Through the Aboriginal Oral Health Program, 
partnerships have formed between SA Dental 
Service and other participating organisations.  
These partnerships have been pivotal in raising the 
profile of oral health and increasing acceptability 
of dental services among Aboriginal people, 
resulting in an increase in Aboriginal people 
accessing dental care.

The Aboriginal Liaison Program has  expanded to 
all 24 Community Dental Service sites. All Adult 
Community Dental Clinics are now participating in 
the Aboriginal Liaison Program for adults with many 
Aboriginal adults self-referring to SA Dental Service.  

In 2012/13, 2,548 Aboriginal adult clients who 
attended SA Dental Service Community Dental Clinics 
were referred through Aboriginal Liaison Program 
(part of the Aboriginal Oral Health Program).

In 2012/13 4,274 Aboriginal adult clients were 
treated in public dental services an increase of 4% 
on the previous year and an increase of 10% since 
baseline in 2010-11.

In 2012/13 4403 Aboriginal children attended SDS 
an increase of 9% compared to 2011/12 and 24% 
increase from 2010/11.

Crunch&amp;Sip 

Crunch&amp;Sip  encourages children to eat fruit and 
vegetables and drink water every day. Schools implement a 
formal break allowing students to eat fruit and vegetables 
and drink water in the classroom. It is a healthy way for 
children to re-fuel, and aids concentration, and mental and 
physical performance at school. This aligns with our 
oral health messages and supports clinical practice.

During 2012-2013, 139 Reception to Year 7 schools 
implemented Crunch&amp;Sip . Within these schools, 
1,605 classes participated with a total of 37,433 
students. Crunch&amp;Sip  also reached 26,823 families 
through these schools.

Following a program review by SA Health, 
Crunch&amp;Sip  will transition to the next stage of 
being championed by parents and teachers, with 
program updates and resources including advice and 
tips for teachers and parents available online.



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 12

New Migrant Program 

Following extensive consultation with the Adelaide 
Migrant Health Service, from May 2012 a pilot 
program was launched to provide priority dental 
care to newly arrived migrants with a refugee 
background. Adult migrants with a refugee 
background are referred by the Adelaide Migrant 
Health Service to designated Community Dental 
Service clinics for dental care. This regime of 
early care to bring an individual s oral health to a 
basic fundamental standard will assist clients to 
confidently seek employment and meet adequate 
nutritional needs. 

Homelessness and Oral Health Project (HOHP)

The HOHP commenced in April 2011 and builds on 
established relationships with key homeless sector 
agencies and involves a collaborative partnership 
between SA Dental Service, the Homelessness 
Support Program and the Department for 
Communities and Social Inclusion. 

The initial focus of the HOHP was to address 
identified service gaps such as access to timely and 
affordable care for vulnerable people in need of 
urgent dental treatment in the inner city area. 

Following an extensive review, the  2012-2013 
year saw the HOHP expanded to cover the most of 
the metropolitan and some country areas of South 
Australia. 

Cessation of the Medicare Chronic Disease Program 
also saw a change in the focus from emergency 
care to a general course of care for HOHP clients.  
Treatment provision continues to be provided through 
a mix of public and private dental providers who have 
expressed their interest and willingness to be involved.

Supported Residential Facility (SRF) 
Dental Program 
In South Australia there are 29 Supported Residential Facilities 
(SRFs) accommodating around 850 people. Established in 
2004, the SRF Dental Program continues to offer dental 
treatment to all residents of licenced pension-only SRFs. 

People living in SRFs tend to have complex and 
diverse needs and many have a history of chronic 
homelessness. Overall, SRF residents are a vulnerable 
group who face significant barriers in accessing 
mainstream health services. 

Over the past year around 590 (69%) SRF residents have 
received dental treatment which compares favourably 
with attendance patterns of the general population. 

The SRF Dental Program involves a multidisciplinary 
approach involving SRF residents, SRF Managers and 
care staff, external support agency staff, and public 
and private dental professionals. Excellent working 
relationships have been established supporting a 
greater awareness of the importance of oral health, 
and better oral health outcomes for SRF residents.

Focus on increased country access 

Strategies were developed to increase access for 
country clients where significant waiting time 
inequity existed. Mobile dental vans were placed 
at Mount Gambier (waiting time 44.7 months at 
December 2012) and the Riverland (waiting time 
27.8 months at July 2012).

This enabled recruitment of additional salaried dentists. 
Staff worked with the private sector to maximise their 
ability to see SA Dental Service clients via the private 
sector schemes funded by SA Dental Service.

This resulted in waiting times reducing to 34.5 
months in Mount Gambier and 7.2 months in the 
Riverland  by June 2013.

Homeless Referrals
60

50

40

30

 20

 10

Ju
ly

A
ug

11/12

12/13

Se
pt O

ct

N
ov

D
ec Ja

n

Fe
b

M
ar

A
pr

il

M
ay

Ju
ne

      0

SRF_YTD Patients 2012/2013
500

450

400

350

250

300

150

200

 100
 50

Jul-12

58

404

344
322

298
284

259
239

204

160

122

416

Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 Jan-13 Feb-13 Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13

N
um

be
r o

f P
at

ie
nt

s

Int Patients

Ext Patients

      0
24

60
77

93

44

110 117104
131 135

174
150



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 13

The survey has five main foci:
&gt; To establish residential aged care facilities  knowledge 

of the Better Oral Health in Residential Care Model 
and if so have they implemented the Model. 

&gt; To establish whether oral health assessments are 
conducted for residents.

&gt; To establish whether oral health care plans are 
developed for residents.

&gt; To establish whether staff have received any 
training on oral health care.

&gt; To establish whether residents have access to 
dental treatment.

The key findings included:
&gt; The difficulty residential aged care facilities have 

accessing a dentist particularly on site. 
&gt; The difficulty many residents have accessing a 

private and / or public dentist offsite. 
&gt; Overall the facilities in the country have far more 

difficulty accessing a dental professional than 
their counterparts in the metropolitan area. 

&gt; Many reported the Better Oral Health in Residential 
Aged Care Model is a positive and useful tool however 
there is a continued need for care staff to be educated 
and trained to provide oral health care to residents. 

&gt; Education is also required to ensure facilities are 
equipped to implement and committed to embed 
the Better Oral Health in Residential Care Model 
in policy, planning and service development. 

&gt; Facilities concerns of the lack of resources 
(people, financial and time) to continue the 
implementation of the Model. 

Planning re how to address these issues will continue 
in 2013-2014

The Better Oral Health in Residential Care educational 
resources continues to attract national and international 
interest. This year a visiting UK Public Health Dentist 
from the Birmingham and Solihull NHS Cluster entered 
into an agreement with SA Dental Service to adapt 
some the resources to better suit the UK context.

Building Better Oral Health Communities

In late 2011-12 SA Dental Service secured $1.4M 
funding for a project called Building Better Oral Health 
Communities under the Commonwealth Department 
for Health and Ageing s Encouraging Better Practice 
in Aged Care (EBPAC) initiative. The Project partners 
include three SA community aged care providers, one 
of which is an Aboriginal specific service, an aged 
care provider in the Hunter New England area of NSW 
together with the Hunter New England Oral Health 
Service.  The University of Adelaide School of Nursing 
and ARCPOH are our project evaluation partners.

Enhanced service provision models for 
pre-school children including GA/RA models  

Revised guidelines and protocols for provision of 
General Anaesthetic (GA) and Relative Analgesia 
(RA) services to children were developed. These 
focussed on referral protocols, preventive care and 
maintenance of children waiting for GA and RA care. 
Information for the families and siblings of child GA 
patients was developed to assist in preventing the 
need for further GAs.

Additional GA sessions were implemented at both 
Noarlunga and Modbury Hospitals.The wait time for 
GAs improved from 20.1 months in August 2012 to 
4.6 months in June 2013 and, from 12.8 months in 
June 2012 to 6.5 months in June 2013 for RA.

Strategic Outcome 2

Integration into GP Plus Centres  

SA Dental Service has four clinics integrated into 
GP Plus centres at Noarlunga, Marion, Modbury 
and Elizabeth.  These clinics are integrated with the 
other health services provided at these local centres, 
which include general practitioners, mental health 
and other allied health services, enabling immediate 
referrals to other disciplines where additional client 
needs are identified. 

Most of these clinics also contribute significantly to 
the training of dental students by providing extensive 
clinical practice experience under the supervision and 
tutelage of qualified clinicians. 

Better Oral Health in Residential Aged Care

High levels of dental disease continues to be suffered 
by people in residential aged care facilities despite the 
Building Better Oral Health Care in Residential Aged Care 
project. Led by SA Dental Service and funded by the 
Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing, the 
project was rolled out Australia wide in 2010 to promote 
a team approach to oral health care for residents. 

This year the Service Planning team surveyed the 273 
Residential Aged Care Facilities in South Australia to 
establish the effectiveness of this model, help inform 
planning for ongoing care and determine what support 
the dental service could provide for the sector. 

Oral health is sustainably integrated 
into the wider health system



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 14

The aims of the Project are to:
&gt; develop a model of oral health care for use in 

community aged care which is person centred and 
supports the principles of ageing well at home

&gt; support the changing needs of older people as 
they transition from independence to informal 
assistance to formal assistance and finally to 
residential care

&gt;  enhance access to oral health information across 
the continuum of ageing for care workers and 
for older people, their families and the wider 
community

&gt; promote the integration of the four key oral 
health processes of oral health assessment, oral 
health care planning, daily oral hygiene and 
dental referral into routine community aged care 
service delivery. 

Phase 1 of this 2  year project is now well 
underway. Key activities in the first 12 months 
have included formalisation of arrangements 
with our project partners, the recruitment of staff 
within both SA Dental Service and our project 
partner organisations, gaining the relevant ethics 
approvals, establishment of the project governance 
arrangements and most importantly the recruitment 
of older people to participate in the project and the 
collection of baseline information

Disability Project 

The Australia Research Centre for Population 
Oral Health (ARCPOH) commenced a project in 
collaboration with SA Dental Service and the 
Disability Sector. This project aims to:
&gt; collaborate with sector agencies to develop a 

feasible and sustainable oral health intervention 
program

&gt; train care workers to provide oral care for people 
with disabilities

&gt; evaluate the training program via care worker 
questionnaires and assessment of care recipient 
clinical outcomes.

14 different agencies sent representatives to the 
initial workshops and a steering group was formed. 

Despite this initial interest, recruitment for participants 
in the project has been difficult, and it is running 
slightly behind planned timeframes at this stage.

Strategic Outcome 3

Consumer Advisory Panel 2012-13  

The SA Dental Service Consumer Advisory Panel 
(CAP) was established in 1999 as a sub-committee 
of SA Dental Service Executive.  Panel members 
are representative of each of the major population 
groups to whom public dental services are 
provided. 

CAP s role is to advise the Executive Director on 
effective consumer participation in oral health 
programs, operational policy and strategy and 
impact on quality oral health service outcomes.  
CAP also advocates to the Executive Director on 
behalf of the community to promote attention 
and sensitivity to the needs of disadvantaged and 
marginalised consumers and communities. 

During 2012-13 CAP was actively involved in 
&gt;  providing advice on draft organisational policies 

and procedures
&gt;  commenting on a range of written materials for 

consumers
&gt;  providing advice to Executive on how best to 

manage saving strategies
&gt;  urging support for proposed Federal funding for 

public dental treatment  through their member 
organisations 

&gt;  promoting information about SA Dental Service 
to their communities of interest.

Two CAP meetings were held away from Flinders St 
at the Marion GP Plus and Modbury GP Plus Super 
clinics.

The community and private dental sector 
are involved in the planning, design and 
monitoring of public dental services



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 15

SA Dental Service is active in the 
development of public oral health 
policy at a State level and National level.

 Strategic Outcome 4

South Australia continued to provide secretariat 
support for the National Oral Health Monitoring 
Group. Executive Director, Martin Dooland, was 
acting chair for most of the year. This group 
monitors the implementation of the National Oral 
Health Plan 2004-13 and develops a report for the 
Health Ministers at the Standing Council on Health. 
Dr Dooland also chairs the National Dental Directors 
Group and SA provides the secretariat support for 
this group as well.

Changes in Demand for Care and the 
National Partnership Agreement on Treating 
More Public Dental Patients

A number of strategies commenced in 2012-13 as 
a result of additional Commonwealth funding for 
public dental services announced in the May 2012 
Federal budget as part of the Commonwealth Dental 
Reform Package. 

The most significant of these was the National 
Partnership Agreement (NPA) on Treating More Public 
Dental Patients.  This Agreement provides up to $27.7 
m for SA and was signed in January 2013 with the SA 
Implementation Plan approved by the Commonwealth 
in May 2013. In line with NPA objectives, South 
Australia s Implementation Plan focuses on:
&gt; Improving access to general dental care for:
? adults who have not accessed care for a number 

of years
? high risk groups inclusive of those with medical 

conditions that impact oral health, or whose 
oral health potentially impacts their general 
health and wellbeing.  A planned recall interval 
system (regular dental check-ups) has been 
introduced for identified at-risk adult clients. 

&gt; Expanding and enhancing access to dental care 
 for eligible
? Older people
? Aboriginal people
? People living in regional, rural and remote areas.

In order to fund the NPA the Commonwealth 
announced in August 2012 that several existing 
Commonwealth programs were closing. The 
Chronic Disease Dental Scheme was closed from 

30 November 2012. Closure of this scheme led to a 
sharp increase in the demand for adult care across 
restorative, prosthetic and specialist care.  Demand 
for restorative services for example, increased by 42% 
between MCDDS closure in Oct 2012 and June 2013.

Approval of the Implementation Plan and release of 
Commonwealth funds in May 2013 had a dramatic 
and immediate effect on both the waiting time and 
the numbers of people waiting for care including:
&gt; Immediate removal of 470 people (or more than 

55%), from the routine denture waiting lists with 
the offer of care.

&gt; The removal of more than 14,400 names from the 
restorative waiting lists, a five-fold increase over 
the normal rate of the flow of offers of care

Waiting times are expected to reduce further in the 
coming months. 

While some additional clinical staff will be employed 
under the NPA, the majority of clinical activity arising 
from these offers of care will occur in the private 
sector under existing private sector dental schemes 
arrangements.  

Grow Up Smiling

The Grow Up Smiling (GUS) program, a further 
component of the Commonwealth Government s 
Dental Reform, was announced in Aug 2012.  
This initiative will replace the current Teen Dental 
Plan. Under GUS low and middle income earning 
families will be eligible to access subsidised basic 
general dental care in either the private or public 
dental sectors.  

Prior to implementation in January 2014, 
SA Dental Service will require substantial changes 
to existing business and work practices as well 
as the financial and budget model in the School 
Dental Service.

Health Workforce Australia (HWA)  Oral 
Health Workforce 2025 Project  

HWA commenced a new project considering 
Australia s Future Oral Health Workforce 
requirements through to 2025. In January 2013,  
Geoff Franklin, General Manager of Statewide 
Dental Services was invited to join the National 
Project Advisory Group representing the State 
Dental Directors and attended a number of 
meetings. HWA are expected to release a report in 
2013-14 detailing workforce supply and demand 
projections for registered dental provider groups.   



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 16

Scope of Practice Registration Standard for 
Dental Providers

During the year key SA Dental Service staff attended 
forum(s) and/or provided feedback to the Dental Board 
of Australia (DBA) as part of its review of the Scope of 
Practice Registration Standard. The Scope of Practice 
Registration Standard is one of the regulatory drivers 
which determine how the dental workforce is to be 
utilised in the future. Providing feedback to the DBA is 
an important step towards being able to optimise use 
of the dental workforce. It is expected the Dental Board 
consultation and review process will conclude in 2013-14.

Strategic Outcome 5

Health Promotion Practice Guidelines

Following the formal launch of the Health 
Promotion Practice Guidelines (HPPG) in June 2012, 
implementation of the guidelines across SA Dental 
Service commenced. To support implementation, 
all SWDS staff were invited to participate in health 
promotion professional development training. 

In 2012  13, 220 SWDS staff attended Health 
Promotion in the Dental Clinic Setting training and  
460 SWDS staff attended Motivational Interviewing 
training. A range of resources were developed 
to support both training programs. An external 
facilitator, Dr Tom Nehmy, was contracted to deliver 
the Motivational Interviewing training.

An internal and external evaluation of HPPG 
training showed that staff found the sessions 
extremely useful and beneficial to their daily clinical 
work. Throughout the year, Health Promotion 
introduced strategies, including refresher sessions, 
regular clinic visits and newsletter updates 
to encourage clinical staff to continue using 
Motivational Interviewing and enhance their 
understanding of effective oral health promotion. 

Smoking Cessation

In line with oral health s integral role within general 
health, a clinic based tobacco cessation program 
for patients has been implemented in all CDS clinics 
and continues to be rolled out in ADH. SDS staff 

Population based health promotion 
underpins all of SA Dental Service 
Programs and clinical programs have 
an increased focus on prevention and 
early intervention.

attended youth focussed quitting workshops which 
provided information and strategies to engage 
with young people about smoking and tobacco 
use. Health Promotion developed a suite of new 
quitting resources with an oral focus to support staff 
conversations with patients about smoking.

The program has resulted in significant increases 
in the number of public dental patients receiving 
short interventions for smoking cessation. 17,313 
interventions have been recorded since 2006.

The program has resulted in significant increases 
in the number of public dental patients receiving 
short interventions for smoking cessation. Patients  
interest in quitting is assessed and where appropriate 
the person is linked to Quit SA.

A large number of SA Dental Service Aboriginal 
clients are smokers. Health Promotion worked 
with Drug and Alcohol Services SA (DASSA) and 
Aboriginal people to 
develop display material 
and resources which aim 
to make the waiting 
room a more welcoming 
space for Aboriginal 
clients and to prepare 
them for a
conversation 
about their 
smoking.

Child Recall 
Intervals 2012/13  

The reduction in 
median actual recall 
interval for children 
treated in the School Dental 
Service was sustained with a reduction to 

SADS TOTAL Number of People Receiving Short 
Intervention for Smoking Cessation (QUIT)

 1000

 3000

 2000

 4000

 6000

 5000

JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
      0

2011/12

2010/11

2009/10

2012/13

Aboriginal people to 
develop display material 
and resources which aim 
to make the waiting 
room a more welcoming 
space for Aboriginal 
clients and to prepare 

treated in the School Dental 
Service was sustained with a reduction to 



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 17

18.1 months or less, during 2012-13.  This is well 
below the target of 18.7 months and the lowest 
levels since before 2005. Recent emphasis on 
ensuring timely children s recalls, in particular for 
high risk children, has started to show improvement 
with a reduction on the total number of overdue 
recalls. Significant improvements in actual recall 
timeliness are anticipated to be delivered in 2013-
14 as a consequence of continuing strategies 
implemented  since 2011-12.  

Preventive Care 2012/13   

The delivery of preventive services per client 
improved across all of SA Dental Service. Across the 
School Dental Service the emphasis on providing 
Fissure Sealants and the increased application of 
Fluoride to the teeth of children assessed as being at 
higher risk of caries was maintained. The outcomes 
of this sustained increase in clinical prevention for 
children can be seen in the  Mean DMFT  graph 
on page 10 which shows the amount of dental 
decay experience in 12 year old children attending 
the School Dental Service fell for the fourth year in 
succession.

SDS Median RECALL (months)
20.5

20.0

19.5

19.0

18.5

18.0

 17.5

  17.0

M
on

th
s

A
pr

-J
un

05

O
ct

-D
ec

05

O
ct

-D
ec

06

O
ct

-D
ec

07

O
ct

-D
ec

08

O
ct

-D
ec

09

O
ct

-D
ec

10

O
ct

-D
ec

11

A
pr

-J
un

06

A
pr

-J
un

07

A
pr

-J
un

08

A
pr

-J
un

09

A
pr

-J
un

10

A
pr

-J
un

11

A
pr

-J
un

12

A
pr

-J
un

13

O
ct

-D
ec

12

     16.5

18.4 18.5

18.9 18.818.7

18.0 18.0
18.2 18.2

17.7
17.9

18.018.1

18.4 18.4 18.418.418.4

19.1 19.1
19.2

19.4 19.519.5 19.5
19.3 19.3 19.319.3

20.0

19.0

18.6 18.5

Reduced emergencies 2012/13  

Dental emergencies treated in 2012-13 were 
26,065, an increase of 1,558 or 6% on 2011 12.  For 
the first three months of 2012-13 the number 
of emergencies was reducing.  However since 
the announcement of the cessation of the 
Commonwealth s Medicare Chronic Disease Dental 
Scheme (MCDDS) in late August 2012, there has 
been significantly increased demand for both 
emergency (+13%) and general services on the state 
public system.  An additional 2,300 more emergency 
patients were seen in the last nine-months, after the 
MCDDS closure, compared with the same period of 
the year before.

The proportion of clients receiving non-emergency 
care improved to 69.9%, an increase from the 
2011-12 result of 68.6%. The computer assisted 
Relative Needs Index triage tool continues to deliver 
consistent assessment of the clinical and social 
indicators for genuine emergency care for adults.  
The endorsement of the implementation plan for the 
National Partnership on Treating More Public Dental 
Patients from mid-May 2013, allowed for more 
general dental care clients to be seen over the last 
six weeks of the financial year, with 3,837 additional 
non-emergency patients seen in 2012-13 than the 
previous year.

Waiting Lists 2012/13    

Waiting lists for general and denture public dental 
care reduced in 2012-13 as shown in the graphs 
below.  The average waiting time for patients 
removed from routine care waiting lists reduced to 
11.5 months at June 2013 compared with 
16 months at June 2012. The weighted mean 
waiting time for patients being removed from 
denture waiting lists was 11.4 months at June 2012 
compared with 14.8 months at June 2012. 

Clinical Prevention Services
Rate per 100 Consenting Patients

350

250

200

300

150

 100

  50

2006/2007 2007/2008 2086/2009 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013
      0

Topical Fluoride

Fissure Sealant

Conc Fluoride (Teeth treated)

Dental Emergency Courses of Care
commenced per annum

5,000
10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

30,000

35,000

40,000

45,000

50,000

55,000

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 18

However, difficulty attracting dentists to some 
country areas and limited treatment of public 
patients by private practices has maintained a wide 
gap in average waiting times between the Adelaide 
metropolitan area and several country areas of at 
least one year longer wait.

The combined average waiting time for Specialist 
Services at the Adelaide Dental Hospital increased 
slightly from 14.4 months in June 2012 to 15.6 
months by June 2013, continuing a long term trend 
evident since March 2011.

Dental Wait Lists (Months)
36

30

24

18

 12

   6

Ju
n-

10

Se
p-

10

Specialist
Denture 

General Restorative

D
ec

-1
0

M
ar

-1
1

Ju
n-

11

Se
p-

11

D
ec

-1
1

Ju
n-

12

M
ar

-1
2

Se
p-

12

D
ec

-1
2

M
ar

-1
3

Ju
n-

13

      0

 Strategic Outcome 6

Quality of Care &amp; Clinical Indicators  

The SA Dental Service participates in the national 
quality clinical indicators program managed by 
the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards 
(ACHS).  From 2012, the ACHS released a new and 
refined suite of Clinical Indicators for Oral Health 
services, reducing the number of indicators from 23 
to 10 measures.  The main oral health care clinical 
indicators focus on monitoring and minimising 
returns for repeated care, usually on the same tooth 
   also known as retreatment rates, or unplanned 
return visits for adult dental services (restorations, 
extractions and dentures), endodontics and 
children s dental care (restorations, pulpotomy and 
fissure sealants).

2012/13 ACHS Quality Clinical Indicators (Oral Health) 
results:

The SA Dental Service achieved statistically significantly 
better than peer aggregate results for low rates of 
adult restoration retreatment on the same tooth within 
6 months in the first half of 2012, and for denture 
remakes within 12 months.  For the remaining seven 
clinical indicator areas both the School and Community 
Dental Services achieved mostly better than peer 
average rates, all within the peer norm range.

For the June 2013 ACHS indicator report, covering 
the second half of 2012, plus six-month lag for return 
events, SA Dental Service achieved statistically equal 
to national peer aggregate results in all nine of the 
indicators areas submitted.  There were no outliers.

Accreditation 

In second half of 2012 SA Dental Service completed 
a Periodic Review against the EQuIP5 framework 
with Australian Council on Health Care Standards 
(ACHS).  SA Dental Service maintained its accredited 
status and received excellent results.

In January 2013 SA Dental Service transitioned 
from the EQuIP5 framework developed by ACHS to 
the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality 
in Health Care National Safety and Quality Health 
Service (NSQHS) Standards for Accreditation.  
SA Health mandated that all health care services 
would be accredited against the NSQHS standards 
from 2013 onwards which follows endorsement of 
these by Australian Health Ministers in 2011.

Transitioning to the NSQHS standards involved 
a review of our contract with ACHS and the 
opportunity to select a new provider.  The program 
for NSQHS altered the accreditation cycle from 
4 years to 3 years. Following an extensive review of 

Client focused quality systems drive 
improved clinical and non-clinical 
services which are demonstrably 
efficient and effective.

ACHS Clinical Indicators
Restoration Retreatment (6mths)
Cl1.1 (adult) Cl3.1 (child) 

  1%

  2%

  4%

  3%

  6%

  5%

2010_H2 2011_H1 2011_H2 2012_H1 2012_H2 2013_H1
      0%

Peer Adult Peer Child

Reporting Period (allow for lag for return services)

Adult         Child



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 19

400

350

300

250

200

150

100

50

0

Ju
l-

11

Ju
l-

12
A

u
g

-1
2

Se
p

-1
2

O
ct

-1
2

N
o

v-
12

D
ec

-1
2

Ja
n

-1
3

Fe
b

-1
3

M
ar

-1
3

A
p

r-
13

M
ay

-1
3

Ju
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-1
3

A
u

g
-1

1
Se

p
-1

1
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ct
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1
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11
D

ec
-1

1
Ja

n
-1

2
Fe

b
-1

2
M

ar
-1

2
A

p
r-

12
M

ay
-1

2
Ju

n
-1

2

scheme introduced

the providers it was decided by SA Dental Service Executive 
to continue our contract with ACHS until 2016.
  
There are 10 NSQHS standards, but Dental 
Services are only reviewed against 6 of these as 
the remaining 4 are determined by the Australian 
Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care 
National Safety to be non applicable.

The 6 NSQHS standards for Dental Services are:
&gt; Governance for Safety and Quality in Health 

Service Organisations
&gt; Partnering with Consumers
&gt; Preventing and Controlling Healthcare Associated 

Infections
&gt; Medication Safety
&gt; Patient Identification and Procedure Matching
&gt; Clinical Handover.

A series of workshops were attended by SA Dental 
staff from January to June to ensure familiarity with 
the new standards and their application to SA Dental 
Service in preparation for the first organisation 
wide survey in August 2013 utilising the NSQHS 
Standards.

Op Plan 6.1 CDS Clinical KPIs

The original 10 Adult (CDS) Clinical KPIs have 
been reviewed; two KPIs (Bitewing radiographs at 
first General Course of Care examination and the 
provision of preventive advice at an emergency 
appointment) will continue to be recorded on a 
rolling 3-monthly basis with the remaining 8 Clinical 
KPIs recorded 6-monthly. A new Clinical KPI will be 
introduced to monitor the prescription of antibiotics 
by dentists in SWDS.

In line with the CDS Clinical KPIs the School Dental 
Service Clinical KPIs have also been reviewed 
reduced to a rolling 3-monthly report with an 
emphasis on prevention (fluoride application, 
fissure-sealant provision and bitewing radiograph 
diagnosis).

The revised Clinical KPIs will continue to be 
evaluated by both the clinical leadership team and 
Executive to determine clinical performance and 
compliance and the suitability of the revisions. 

Specialist Schemes

During 2012/13 the Adelaide Dental Hospital 
(ADH) commenced development of private dental 
schemes similar to the General and Emergency 
Dental Schemes to enable public patients waiting 

on long dental specialist lists at the ADH to access 
their care earlier.  The first such scheme to be rolled 
out is the Specialist Dental Scheme (Endodontics). 
This commenced in February 2013, with all private 
endodontists in SA agreeing to participate. The 
scheme allows for referral of suitable complex 
endodontic cases to the private sector for treatment, 
thus reducing the SRU waiting list for specialist 
endodontic treatment. Feedback from the private 
practices and patients has been very positive. The 
endodontists report that the cases being referred are 
truly complex, which is a reflection of appropriate 
case appraisal and selection by SRU. The private 
specialist practices also report that the processes 
are working smoothly and efficiently, and patient 
and provider expectations are being met as a result 
of clearly communicated procedures. Since the 
introduction of the scheme, the number of patients 
on the SRU endodontics waiting list has reduced to 
68 by end June 2013. 

Corporate Services Developments

SA Health continues to review non-clinical services 
and implement consolidated services to achieve 
improved efficiencies through economies of scale. 
For SA Dental Service this saw the closure of the SA 
Dental Service stores warehouse in Hindmarsh which 
housed and delivered dental supplies to all clinics for 
more than 10 years. From July 2012, all clinical and 
non-clinical supplies were ordered and distributed 
through the SA Health Distribution Centre at 
Camden Park. After some initial teething problems, 
the new arrangement was effective and resulted in 
the larger clinics receiving deliveries more regularly 
which was of benefit for stock management.
In addition, SA Biomedical Engineering was officially 
formed which saw the transition of the SA Dental 



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 20

Service biomedical engineering technicians to work 
under a centralised model in SA Health. The new 
division now manages all biomedical equipment 
across the state. Technicians remain allocated to 
SA Dental Service to support dental equipment 
maintenance. 

Strategic Outcome 7

Credentialling and Scope of Practice 

During the year SA Dental Service Credentialing 
Committee maintained the credentialing status 
of over 500 Dental Practitioners, this includes all 
non-SA Dental Service employees who provide and 
or supervise the provision of dental care within SA 
Dental Service (eg University Tutors). 

The Credentialing Committee continued to refine 
the processes for documenting the scope of 
clinical practice of credentialed dental practitioners 
employed by SA Dental Service, a similar process 
has been commenced for non-SA Dental Service 
employees.

Staff Biennial Conference

In June 2012 over 540 SA Dental Service staff 
attended the organisation s Biennial Conference. 
Themed  Excellence in Action , the program 
included presentations by staff and invited speakers.  
Feedback from attendees indicated the contribution 
made by guest speakers and  staff about  their 
projects and activities were well received. 

SA Dental Service acknowledged the outstanding 
achievements of a number of its  Unsung Heroes   
those staff who made a significant contribution 
to improving oral health outcomes for South 
Australians  Badges acknowledging 30 and 40 years 
of service were presented to staff in recognition of 
their contribution  to the organisation. Conference 
day also provided an opportunity for staff to network 
with colleagues from other sites across the state.   

Teaching on the Run

In October 2012, Workforce Development Unit staff 
completed facilitator training for the Teaching on 
the Run program.  This course had been identified 

SA Dental Service is an employer of 
choice, has sufficient skilled clinical and 
non clinical workforce and is making 
full and flexible use of its capabilities.

by the Dental Board of Australia as being particularly 
relevant for staff involved with clinical tutoring. 
The purpose of the program was to:
&gt; Help clinical tutors plan for, and recognise 

opportunities for teaching in the clinical setting
&gt; Help clinicians provide effective feedback
&gt; Provide strategies supporting good supervision 

and learner support
&gt;  Build clinicians confidence in their ability as 

teachers
&gt; Encourage sharing of ideas and networking 

among clinical teachers to enhance their practice.
 
Voluntary Dentist Graduate Year Program

An initiative of the Commonwealth Government 
Dental Reform Package is the Voluntary Graduate 
Year Program (VDGYP). Under this program new 
dental graduates work in the public sector providing 
treatment to eligible patients as well as undertaking 
a structured educational program to enhance their 
clinical practice. 

SA Dental Service was allocated funding and 
recruited one Graduate for the 2013 calendar year 
and expects to increase these numbers slightly in the 
coming years. The graduate was based at the Marion 
and Noarlunga GP plus Community clinics and did 
rotations through a number of the clinical units of 
the Adelaide Dental Hospital.

The cost of the graduate salaries and clinical mentor 
time is included in the Commonwealth funding. 

The VDGPY Program also incorporates allocation of 
capital funding of $1.9 million to provide space to 
support the VDGYP placements. SA Dental Service 
is looking to establish a new 6 chair clinic in the 
western metropolitan area with this funding. 

Strategic Outcome 8

Collaborative Partnership with the Australian 
Research Centre for Population Oral Health 
(ARCPOH)

Research Agenda 2012/13

SA Dental Service has a long, well established and 
successful relationship with the Australian Research 

SA Dental Service is an active partner 
with the dental tertiary education and 
research sectors.



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 21

Centre for Population Oral Health (ARCPOH).  
Research topics currently underway include:
&gt; Adult recall intervals and services in a course of 

care
&gt; Risk assessment and effective preventive 

interventions among adults
&gt; Review and update of child caries risk assessment 

tool
&gt; Focus Group testing Aboriginal clients about 

barriers to care that influence attendance patterns
&gt; Improve access to oral health care for people 

experiencing disabilities
&gt; Assess the long term outcomes of improved 

access to dental care for older people.

Research activities range from relatively short 
duration literature reviews to clinical trials taking 
place over several years. The research results and 
findings will be used to inform broad policy decisions 
and clinical service provision in future years.

National Child Oral Health Survey 2012/13  

The National Child Oral Health Survey being 
conducted by SA Dental Service in conjunction with 
ARCPOH has been extended to the end of 2013.  
The enrolment of participating schools has proven to 
be more difficult than expected. The survey includes 
a questionnaire for parents to complete as well 
as dental examinations of children included in the 
survey by a small team of SA Dental Service staff.  
The quality of the questionnaire returns seems high, 
with little missing data. The oral epidemiological 
examinations have been progressing smoothly and 
examination teams have completed about 700 
examinations during visits to about a third of the 
participating schools. 

Public dental infrastructure supports the 
provision of contemporary public dental 
services and is integrated with other 
health services wherever possible.

Strategic Outcome 9

During the year there were further significant steps 
forward in improving public dental infrastructure 
across the State.

Infrastructure Improvements in Country Areas 

SA Dental Service staff have continued to be heavily 
involved with Architects and Engineering consultants 
developing detailed plans on major projects for 
Wallaroo, Port Lincoln and Mount Gambier.  

It was very exciting to see building works 
commencing with Wallaroo starting in October 
2012 following the tender process that saw GC&amp;J 
Constructions appointed as the builder. 

Mossop Group Pty Ltd were appointed to build the 
Port Lincoln Hospital development including the 7 chair 
clinic for SA Dental Service and commenced onsite 
in April 2013. Built Environs were appointed for the 
Mount Gambier Hospital development that includes 
a 6 chair extension to the SA Dental Service together 
with a minor refurbishment of the existing clinic.

This year also saw work commence on the new 6 
chair Murray Bridge clinic with architects appointed 
and concept planning beginning after delays in sign 
off on funding agreements.



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 22

Other Infrastructure Projects

The new 6 chair Aged Care Clinic was built in 
the Adelaide Dental Hospital. This proved to be 
a challenging project due to existing building 
conditions and the tight timeframes required to 
reduce impact on students, which resulted in the 
General Practice Offices being moved and refitted. 
The final result was extremely pleasing and included 
an inbuilt wheelchair lifter and 2 portable lifters that 
will assist staff and patients.

The Prison clinics at the Adelaide Remand Centre 
and the Women s Prison were approved for upgrade.

The Mitcham School Dental Clinic was extended and 
completely refurbished.

Freedom of Information 
2012/13 
Information Statement

The Freedom of Information Act 1991 gives 
members of the public a legally enforceable right 
to access information held by the South Australian 
Government, subject to certain restrictions.

Functions of SA Dental Service directly impacts 
on the public 

The work of SA Dental Service directly impacts on 
the public as a result of providing public dental 
services to eligible South Australians who hold 
current Centrelink Pensioner Concession Cards or 
Health Care Cards.

Public participation

The public can contribute to policy development 
within SA Dental Service in a number of ways. 
SA Dental Service accesses external expertise and 
policy advice through statutory and non-statutory 
advisory committees such as the Consumer Advisory 
Panel, which are comprised of both government 
and non-government representatives. SA Dental 
Service consults with major consumer groups, 
circulates discussion papers, calls for submissions 
on particular topics, and convenes public meetings 
in metropolitan and country areas. It also fosters 
a culture of inclusion of communities and service 
providers in planning, development and evaluation 
of services. These processes ultimately facilitate the 

community s access to services and their informed 
decision making about service options and program 
developments.

Types of documents held by SA Dental Service 

SA Dental Service holds various hard copy and/
or electronic oral health publications in addition to 
administrative and client files. These include books, 
reports, reviews, serial publications, pamphlets, 
information sheets, codes of practice, surveys, 
guidelines, policies, procedures, programs, strategies, 
directories and evaluations.  

Arrangements and procedures for seeking 
access to documents

Application forms for access to documents can be 
downloaded from the SA Dental Service website, 
obtained through any clinic or provided by the 
Client Relations Unit.  The Client Relations Unit is 
responsible for processing FOI requests and is able to 
assist with any FOI related enquiries.



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 23

Applications for Access (2012-13)

Details of Applications    Personal       Non Personal    Total

New applications for the year    37  0   37

Applications brought forward from previous year 0  0   0

Total to be processed     37  0   37

  Determined      36  0   36

  Transferred in full     0  0   0

  Withdrawn      0  0   0

Totally actually processed    36  0   36

  Unfinished      1  0   1

Outcomes of Access Applications (2012-13)

Outcome description     Personal Non Personal  Total

  Full Release      36  0   36

  Partial Release     0  0   0

  Refused access     0  0   0

Total       36  0   36

 
Applications for Amendment (2012-13)

       Personal Non Personal  Total

New Amendment applications     1  0   1

Outcome description

Determined      1  0   1

Notation added to record    1  0                                     1

Total       1  0   1

Applications and Outcomes for Internal Reviews (2012-13)

       Personal Non Personal  Total

New Internal Review applications    0  0   0

Outcome description

Determined      0  0   0

Decision confirmed     0  0                                     0

Total       0  0   0



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 24

Adelaide Dental Hospital Statistics
Treatment Statistics

     2009/2010 2010/2011 2 011/2012   2012/2013

Patients     20,883    21,276    21,527      22,096

Attendances    68,293    69,600    75,531                 77,174

Diagnostic / Preventive    

Examinations    11,844    13,306    14,506      13,455

Consultations    11,784    12,010                11,487      12,238

Radiographs    28,263    29,680    28,739      27,830

Periodontal treatment
dental health education

   
14,798    16,701    18,741      18,551

Conservative Dentistry    

Temporary restorations     1,418      1,469      1,939        1,915

Plastic restoratio
(amalgam, GIC &amp; resin)   13,515    12,612    14,219      14,708

Complex restorations     1,029         982      1,032           943

Root canal treatment     1,061         928         883           947

Prosthetic Dentistry    

Full dentures         642         548         495           498

Part dentures         689         633         692           834

Denture relines / re-bases        167         156         173           186

Denture repairs         174         196         211           194

Denture adjustments     1,166         982         935        1,056

Oral Surgery    

Simple extractions   13,145    12,348    12,084      12,280

Surgical extractions     2,413      1,907      2,101        2,863

Orthodontics    

Removable appliances**        790         791         942           982

Fixed appliances
(Arches)          890      1,220      1,125        1,134



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 25

Adelaide Dental Hospital Statistics (cont.)
Waiting Lists
Number of people on waiting lists

Patient Visits   seeing a dental student

  02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 10/11 11/12   12/13

Orthodontics 1,782 2,481 2,791 3,120 1,249 1,222 1,165  708  626 1,210 1,710

Oral Surgery    885 1,092 1,141 1,008 1,125    819    765  494  721    895   898

500

0
02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 10/11 12/1311/12

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

3,500

Adelaide Dental Hospital Specialist Waiting Lists
Number of persons Waiting at 30th June

Oral Surgery
Orthodontics

5000

0
05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 10/11 12/1311/12

10000

15000

20000

25000

30000

35000

40000

45000
Total Number of BDS Student Patient Visits per year

CDS-BDS5
SDS-BDS4

ADH
TOTAL

         05/06        06/07       07/08       08/09       09/10       10/11       11/12       12/13

Adelaide Dental Hospital      21198       22978      26426      25816      26003      27272       29707     29193

Community- BDS5        2495         2816  2934        6978        9716        7990         7386       9272

School Dental/Pedo BDS4       1826         1677  1807        1242        1539        1296         1982       2163

All                                25519       27471      31167      34036      37258      36558       39075     40628



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 26

School Dental Service Statistics
Children under care (consents)

In 2012/13, the School Dental Service cared for 135,012 registered children; 110,829 pre-school and primary 
school children (-937) and 24,183 (-545) secondary school students. The number of patients under care is 
1,482 fewer than the 2011/12 total, but 762 children more than in 2010/11.

Slightly fewer secondary school children enrolled in SDS (-2%), continues the year-on-year trend observed 
since 1999.

The Medicare Teen Dental Plan voucher scheme for diagnositc and preventive dental services, allows the SDS 
to offer free dental care to many non-cardholder children aged 12 to 17 years, covered under Family Tax 
Benefit A entitlements.

The number of children under care by the School Dental Service since 1972 is shown below:

&gt;  Note: lower secondary school participation since 1995, associated with an annual secondary school 
subscription.

&gt;  Note: Copayments were introduced for Primary (&amp; some Preschool) children   after first Free course of care   
for non-cardholders from January 2007.

&gt;  Pre-school aged children are now free of copayments for school dental service care.
&gt;  The Medicare Teen Dental Plan voucher scheme introduced from July 2008, also now allows non-carholders to 

receive free SDS care in exchange for the voucher.

50,000

0

19
72

19
74

19
76

19
78

19
80

19
82

19
84

19
86

19
88

19
90

19
92

19
94

19
96

19
98

20
00

20
02

/0
3

20
04

/0
5

20
06

/0
7

20
08

/0
9

20
10

/1
1

20
12

/1
3

100,000

150,000

200,000

250,000
SDS Number of Children Enrolled

Total Number of Children

Pre &amp; Primary

Secondary &amp; Tertiary



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 27

School Dental Service Statistics (cont.)
Dental caries experience

A patient s DMF(T) index is the total number of decayed, missing or filled permanent teeth and is a measure of 
decay experience. The mean DMF(T) for 12 year old children is presented below for years since 1977. The oral 
health of 12 year old SDS patients is represented by a mean DMFTscore of 0.91 in 2013. While there had been 
noticable deterioration in children s oral health over approximately the decade leading up to 2006, this had 
stabilised at about DMFT = 1.0 for about four years, and improved annually between 2009 and 2012. 

1.0

0.5

0.0
1976 1979 1980 1983 1984 1986 1989 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

3.5

4.0

4.5

5.0

SA School Dental Service DMFT   12 year olds



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 28

School Dental Service Statistics (cont.)
Annual services per 100 children under care (registered consents)

          2009/10           2010/11                2011/12      2012/13
                          Freq        Per 100   Freq     Per 100     Freq         Per 100     Freq        Per100        
                                                                   Consents                  Consents                    Consents                    Consents

Patients               81,491                  79,829         84,380              84,975

Attendances                        166,698                164,742       173,208            184,509

Examinations              79,652     57.1       75,860      56.5       81,013      59.4      83,967       62.2

Radiographs                          72,810     52.2       78,817      58.7       88,971 65.2      92,273      68.3

Prophylaxis              14,708     10.5       14,211      10.6       14,592 10.7      15,390      11.4

Topical Fluoride                     19,191     13.8       20,349    1  5.2       19,836      14.5      20,235       15.0

#Conc Fluoride (Teeth treated)    199,610   143.2     302,324    225.2     354,336       259.6     413,611     306.4

Filling (primary + permanent)       50,199     36.0       45,859      34.2      46,758       34.3      44,544       33.0

Pulpotomy (Primary)               2,708       1.9         2,447        1.8         2,350   1.7        2,207        1.6

Root Canal Treatment                  236     0.2            197        0.1            251   0.2          285         0.2
 
Extractions        

Simple (primary+perm)             15,907      11.4      15,791      11.8       15,925 11.7      15,872       11.8

Temporary dressing               4,032      2.9      3,308        2.5         2,585   1.9        2,617         1.9

Orthodontics        

Active appliance                               367      0.3         294        0.2            280   0.2           331        0.2 

Referral                                         3,695      2.6      3,892        2.9         4,512   3.3        4,916        3.6

Mouthguard                               822      0.6         811        0.6            853   0.6           933        0.7

Fissure sealant
and surface protection             86,643      62.1      76,606      57.1       79,767 58.4      80,479      59.6
   
Dental Health Education        

Child-individual*                          52,491     37.6       57,899      43.1      60,256 44.1      65,018      48.2

    small group*                               641     0.5      1,555        1.2         1,343   1.0           804        0.6   

Parent-individual*             83,145     59.6       80,587      60.0       82,073       60.1     84,325      62.5

          -group**                               248     0.2         318        0.2            133   0.1           124        0.1 
     

*    Estimated 5 minute time unit
**  Estimated 15 minute time unit   



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 29

Community Dental Service Statistics 
Treatment Statistics (Community Dental Clinics and Private Sector Schemes)
Number of services provided 2012/2013

          CDS                          Contracted Privately              Total 2012/2013

           Freq  Per 100           Freq       Per 100  Freq          Per 100
                                                      Patients                              Patients           Patients

Number of patients         36,096               20,910                  53,846 

Patient attendances         86,902               44,488                131,350 
 
Examinations                      33,927     94.0              15,011             71.8    48,938            90.9
 
Radiographs                      37,045   102.6              18,607             89.0    55,652          103.4

Periodontal treatment /         
36,111   100.0              11,772             56.3    47,883            88.9

dental health education  

Temporary restorations           2,714       7.5                   362               1.7      3,076              5.7

Plastic restorations         
37,782   104.7              21,418           102.4    59,200          109.9

(amalgam, GIC &amp; resin)      

Complex restorations               22       0.1                       0              0.0           22              0.0

Root canal treatments             950       2.6                   170              0.8      1,120              2.1

Denture units                       1,669       4.6                 4,427             21.2      6,096            11.3

Denture relines / rebases             201       0.6                    237               1.1         438              0.8

Denture repairs                          183       0.5                 5,774             27.6      5,957            11.1

Denture adjustments          1,517       4.2                      71               0.3      1,588              2.9

Simple extractions         18,301     50.7                 5,383             25.7    23,684            44.0

Surgical extractions              127       0.4                 1,144               5.5            1,271              2.4



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 30

Community Dental Service Statistics (cont.) 
Treatment statistics (Community Dental Clinics and Private Sector Schemes combined)
Number of services provided most recent four years

                                            2009/2010        2010/2011              2011/2012      2012/2013
    Freq Rate     Freq      Rate        Freq       Rate          Freq  Rate 
                                                                 Per 100                  Per 100                  Per 100                 Per 100  
                                                                 Patients                 Patients                Patients                Patients

Number of patients             54,825                 48,635         45,997              53,846

Patient attendances           117,518               108,823       107,543            131,350

Examinations                          45,247     82.5       41,961     86.3       4 0,251      87.5      48,938      90.9

Radiographs                          42,199     77.0       40,056     82.4       41,200       89.6      55,652    103.4

Periodontal treatment / 
dental health education           

  25,529     46.6       26,365     54.2       33,394       72.6      47,883      88.9

Temporary restorations               2,086     3.8      2,486       5.1         2,318  5.0        3,076        5.7
 
Plastic restorations 
(amalgam, GIC &amp; resin)             47,013     85.8       43,419     89.3       42,677      92.8       59,200    109.9

Complex restorations                     4     0.0             0       0.0                1  0.0             22        0.0
  
Root canal treatments                 685     1.2         623       1.3            821  1.8        1,120        2.1
      
Denture units                           6,834    12.5        5,695     11.7         5,549       12.1        6,096      11.3

Denture relines / rebases                 559      1.0         410       0.8            358  0.8           438        0.8

Denture repairs                           6,738    12.3        5,866     12.1          5,151      11.2        5,967       11.1

Denture adjustments              1,566      2.9      1,214       2.5          1,551  3.4        1,588         2.9

Simple extractions            24,290       44.3      22,613     46.5        21,953      47.7      23,684       44.0

Surgical extractions              1,159      2.1         944       1.9          1,022  2.2        1,271         2.4
  



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 31

Community Dental Service Statistics (cont.) 
State Adult Dental Waiting Lists
Waiting lists at Community Dental Service Clinics   adult dental services

State Average Waiting Time (months) at Community Dental Service Clinics

                          02/03   03/04   04/05    05/06   06/07   07/08   08/09    09/10   10/11   11/12    12/13

Prosthetic Waiting Lists   7,611   6,331   6,177    6,119   6,378   6,075   3,776   3,043    1,615     927       429

Conservative Waiting Lists  58,417  63,876  58,121  57,969  42,051 32,429  31,289 28,143  23,951 21,373  13,473

                          02/03   03/04   04/05    05/06   06/07   07/08   08/09    09/10   10/11   11/12    12/13

Prosthetic Waiting Lists    37.9     34.0      34.2    37.5      40.6     38.7     27.8     28.6      16.6     14.8      11.4

Conservative Waiting Lists     31.6        34.8        28.7     26.0        22.6        19.1      17.3        17.7       16.8        16.0        11.5

10,000

02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 10/11 11/12 12/13

20,000

30,000

40,000

50,000

60,000

70,000

CDS State Total Waiting Lists Restorative and Prosthetic
Numbers of Persons Names on Waiting Lists

Prosthetic Waiting List
Restorative Waiting List



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 32

Aboriginal Dental Scheme Statistics 
Treatment Provided 2007/2008   2012/2013

Aboriginal Liaison Project Statistics

                                           2007/2008  2008/2009   2009/2010  2010/2011  2011/2012   2012/2013

Practices participating               46      45            46     55           56                32

Claims submitted                      1,096    969          917   847          611             566

Examinations                                      858    758          775   723          503             519

Dental prevention                         148      72            71     91            57               54

Restorations                                      611    359          300   272           222            185

Endodontics                                          3        2              1       3               1                2

Radiographs                                      581    368          396   370           235            379

Extractions                                      633    567          521   408           275            244

Surgical extractions / oral surgery              60      49               69     75             82              85

Relief of pain / Temporary filling              17      27            15     11               9              11

Dentures units                                       75      61            47     46             29                5

Repairs / maintenance to Dentures             20      35            16     15             16              11

Adjustments or relines                           7        4              3       3               5                2

                                           2007/2008  2008/2009   2009/2010   2010/2011  2011/2012   2012/2013

Number of patients                       183    688        1,351  1,840         2,216         2,500

Patient attendances                       359 1,750        3,679  4,625         5,557         6,322

Courses of care                                    189    727        1,425  1,951          2,352        2,690

Examinations                                    196    861         1,511  2,108          2,442        2,767

Dental prevention /
periodontal treatment                         91    412           909  1,189          2,197        2,898

Restorations                                    141    743        1,792  2,147          2,616        3,289

Endodontics                                        0        2             15       25               28             48

Radiographs                                    199    822        1,534  2,151          2,756         3,307

Extractions                                    172    766        1,506  1,812          2,338         2,518

Surgical extractions / oral surgery              0        1               7       10                 5              12

Relief of pain / temporary filling              7      37             75     149             129            213

Dentures units                                        5      53           129     100             139              86

Repairs / maintenance to dentures            1        0             15         8               12              11

Adjustments or relines                           2      21             53       52               75              71



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 33

Human Resources Statistics 

Number of Employees by Salary Bracket

Status of Employees in Current Position

Number of Executives by Status in Current Position, Gender and Classification

Agency        DSSA

Persons           885 

FTE s         671.5

Number of Persons Separated from the agency 
during the last 12 months         90

Number of Persons Recruited to the agency 
during the 12/13 financial year       124

Number of Persons Recruited to the agency during the 12/13 
financial year AND who were active/paid at June 2013       97

Number of Persons on Leave without Pay at 30 June 2013      35

Male         16.27                 16.76

Female         83.73                              83.24

Gender         % Persons    %FTE

EXEC0A   1           1      1          33     1           33                 2

EXEC0C   1           0                  1          33     0             0                 1

Total                           2           1                  2          67     1           33                 3

Classification            Term Untenured                                                         Total                                   

                                                                                              % of total                     % of total
            Male      Female   Male         Execs        Female         Execs             Total
 

 Male         83.39       21.88                2           5.25         112.52

 Female         480.23       63.97                                 1                     13.78         558.98

 Total         563.62       85.85                                 3                      19.03        671.50

 Male            98        25                                              2                       19             144

 Female          622        78                                              1                       40             741

 Total          720      103                                              3                       59             885

FTEs Gender         Ongoing       Short-term Contract      Long-term Contract      Casual        Total

Persons Gender         Ongoing       Short-term Contract      Long-term Contract      Casual Total

0 - $54,799           10    417   427

$54,800 to $69,699          35    186   221

$69,700 to $89,199          16      56     72

$89,200 to $112,599          20      33     53

$112,600 Plus           63      49   112

Total          144     741   885

Salary Bracket         Male             Female             Total



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 34

Human Resources Statistics (cont.) 
Total Days Leave Taken   Needs to be divided by average FTE figure for the financial year for per FTE figure

Number of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Employees

Number of Employees by Age Bracket by Gender

Cultural and Linguistic Diversity

Total Number of Employees with Disabilities (according to Commonwealth definition)

0 - $54,799      3   427   0.70

$54,800 to $69,699     1   221   0.45

$69,700 to $89,199     3    72   4.17

$89,200 to $112,599     1    53   1.89

$112,600 Plus      0   112   0.00

Total       8   885   0.90

1) Sick Leave Taken               5925.49   

2) Family Carer s Leave Taken            451.6    

3) Miscellaneous Special Leave                          456.75   

Leave Type                        2012/13   

Number of Employees born overseas   48                  144                      192                   21.69

Number of Employees who speak
language(s) other than English at home   

11                  30                     41                   4.63

   1         7       8                                       0.9

 

Name                                  Male               Female       Total  % of Agency

  Male                             Female         Total              % of Agency

Salary Bracket   Aboriginal Employees      Total Employees  % Aboriginal Employees

15 - 19                   18                      0                        18                     2.03

20 - 24                   81                      6                        87                     9.83

25 - 29                                                       67                      9                        76                     8.59

30 - 34                                                       64                    24                        88                     9.94

35 - 39                                                       57                    17                        74                     8.36

40 - 44                                                       71                    11                        82                     9.27

45 - 49                                                       97                    13                      110                   12.43

50 - 54                                                     114                    15                      129                   14.58

55 - 59                                                     119                    24                      143        16.16

60 - 64                                                       51                    17                        68          7.68

65+                                                         2                      8                        10                     1.13

Total                                                     741                  144                      885           100

Age Bracket              Female                 Male                     Total              % of Total



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13 Page 35

Human Resources Statistics (cont.) 
Types of Disability (where specified)

Number of Employees using Voluntary Flexible Working Arrangements by Gender

Documented Review of Individual Performance Management

Leadership and Management Training Expenditure

Disability Requiring Workplace Adaptation  1                7              8         0.9

Physical      0    0  0         0.0

Intellectual     0    0  0         0.0

Sensory      0    0  0         0.0

Psychological/Psychiatric    0    0  0         0.0

Disability                 Male             Female           Total           % ofTotal

Purchased Leave     0      0             0

Flexitime               10    16           26

Compressed Weeks    6    34           40

Part-time               68              505          573

Job Share     0      0              0

Working from Home    1      1              2

% Reviewed within the last 12 months     0.23

% review older than 12 months      60.34

% Not reviewed        39.44

Total training and development              manual calculation
expenditure        $0.00                                     consult Circular 13 

Total Leadership and Management             manual calculation
Development        $0.00             consult Circular 13 

Leave Type                 Male                        Female                      Total           

Documented Review of Individual 
Performance Management                             

Total  
         

Training and Development   Total Cost  % of Total Salary Expenditure



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2012-13Page 36

Financial Statements
SA Dental Service Financial Report as at 30 June 2013

Revenue                                                      YTD Actuals         YTD Budget YTD Variance
Patient/Client Fees    -6,169,508           -5,954,236      215,272
Goods and Services Recharge / Recoveries       -86,407              -143,157       -56,750
Recharges - Employee Related Cost  -1,246,010              -506,361      739,649
Grants, Donations &amp; Subsidies   -1,368,393                -91,518   1,276,875
User Fees and Charges Revenue      -313,998              -119,297      194,701
Investment Income &amp; Other Revenue     -758,534           -2,578,236  -1,819,702

Revenue Total     -9,942,851           -9,392,805      550,046    

Expense
Employee Related Expenses      
Salaries and Wages - Nursing       520,685               429,866       -90,819
Salaries and Wages - Medical Officers      514,027               497,437       -16,590
Salaries and Wages - Weekly Paid       376,197               356,088       -20,109
Salaries and Wages - Clinical Academics        62,412                          0       -62,412
Salaries and Wages - Salaried Employees             43,866,278          44,919,424   1,053,146
Other Employee Related Expenses                6,341,864            6,400,182        58,318

Employee Related Expenses Total             51,681,464          52,602,997      921,533

Non Employee Related Expenses      
Agency Staffing           85,029                 59,425       -25,604
Food Supplies           45,283                 16,717       -28,566
Drug supplies           95,869                   4,633       -91,236
Medical, Para Med &amp; Laboratory Supplies   4,261,774            3,893,646     -368,128
Outside Pathology Charges           2,539                   1,901            -638
Housekeeping                     463,939               274,519     -189,420
Linen Services             9,088                   2,535         -6,553
Electricity, Gas, Fuel        653,745               649,834         -3,911
Minor Equipment        244,739                339,111        94,372
Repairs &amp; Maintenance     1,037,993            1,122,089        84,096
Fee for Service      7,103,956            5,064,566  -2,039,390
Other Supplies &amp; Services      6,320,249            8,536,786   2,216,537
Patient/Client Transport Assistance         24,591                 23,076         -1,515
S &amp; W Purchased Staff from Other SA Health Regions      869,147                          0     -869,147
Grants and Subsidies           48,719                          0       -48,719
Non Employee Related Expenses Total  21,266,659          19,988,838  -1,277,821

Expenses Total     72,948,123          72,591,835     -356,288

Capital Revenue / Expense
Cost or Valuation of Assets Disposed               1,473,833                         0 -1,473,833
Accum Depreciation of Assets Disposed                   -40,300                         0       40,300
Appropriations and SA Government Revenue -1,296,079          -1,871,000    -574,921
Financial and Investment Losses                                -20,063                         0       20,063
Depreciation &amp; Amortisation                            2,319,047               621,681 -1,697,366
Capital Revenue / Expense Total               2,436,438          -1,249,319 -3,685,757 

Grand Total                                                    65,441,711          61,949,711 -3,492,000





For more information

SA Dental Service
GPO Box 864
Adelaide SA 5001
Telephone: 8222 8222
www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/sadental


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