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DEPARTMENT OF
HUMAN SERVICES

2000
2001

Annual

D
epartm

ent of H
um

an
 Services

Report



Department of Human Services

South Australian Health Commission

11-13 Hindmarsh Square,

Adelaide, South Australia 5000

Telephone 8226 6599

Facsimile 8226 6399

This Annual Report is also available on the Department of Human Services website

http:\\www.dhs.sa.gov.au

2002

 ISSN 1446-4403



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r t 1

9 053 people were treated in accident and emergency in public hospitals

28 214 services were provided at public outpatient clinics

6 442 people were admitted to public hospitals

2 992 same-day admissions occurred in public hospitals

1 303 women were screened for breast cancer

12 739 vaccination doses were administered

460 families or individuals received financial counselling and support

77 households were allocated SA Housing Trust (SAHT) housing

7 Aboriginal Housing allocations were made

339 people were given assistance to access housing in the private market
with average bonds of $466 (excluding Aboriginal Housing)

4 Aboriginal customers renting privately were provided with assistance
for bond, rent in advance or rent in arrears

$2.4 million was provided in rent rebates to low income SAHT housing
tenants (excluding Aboriginal Housing)

66 Alternative Care placements were made

8 422 people were visited by a Royal District Nursing Society Nurse

2 063 people were counselled by a community health worker in the
Metropolitan area

1 719 people donated blood

557 calls were received by the Child Abuse Report Line

953 calls were received by Crisis Care

342 babies were born

Human Services at a Glance

Each week in South Australia in 2000-2001:



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r t 2

C o n t e n t s

Human Services at a Glance ..................................................................................................... 1

Chief Executive s Report .......................................................................................................... 3

Ministerial Portfolio Responsibilities ..................................................................................... 9

Boards and Committees .......................................................................................................... 10

Department of Human Services Annual Report

Department of Human Services Overview ............................................................................... 11

Human Services Portfolio Structure ....................................................................................... 13

Strategic Directions

1 Improving Services for Better Outcomes ............................................................................... 14

2 Increasing the State s Capacity to Promote Quality of Life ................................................. 21

3 Redistributing Resources in a Changing Environment .......................................................... 31

4 Strengthening a Culture of Working Together ....................................................................... 33

5 Providing Sound Management ................................................................................................ 36

SA Health Commission Annual Report

Roles and Responsibilities ..................................................................................................... 46

Members of the Commission ................................................................................................... 48

Appendices

1 Hospital Activity Statistics .................................................................................................. 49

2 HR Summary ............................................................................................................................ 50

Employment numbers ....................................................................................................................................... 50
LeadershipSA .................................................................................................................................................... 52
Leave management ........................................................................................................................................... 52
Equal opportunity programs ............................................................................................................................ 53
Fraud detection ................................................................................................................................................ 53
Occupational Health, Safety and Injury Management (OHS&amp;IM) ................................................................... 53
WorkCover liabilities ......................................................................................................................................... 54
Overseas Travel 2000-2001 .............................................................................................................................. 55

3 Financial Performance ............................................................................................................ 56

Account Payment Performance ......................................................................................................................... 56
Contractual Arrangements ............................................................................................................................... 56
External Consultancies ..................................................................................................................................... 57

4 Statement of Reconciliation .................................................................................................. 59

5 Acronyms and Abbreviations, Glossary of Terms .................................................................... 60

6 Freedom of Information ......................................................................................................... 64

7 Departmental Reports &amp; Publications .................................................................................... 66



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r t 3

Letter of Transmittal and
   Chief Executive s Report

To: Hon. Dean Brown MP
Minister for Human Services
Parliament House
North Terrace
Adelaide  SA  5000

Hon. Robert Lawson QC MLC
Minister for Disability Services
Minister for the Ageing
Parliament House
North Terrace
Adelaide  SA  5000

Dear Ministers,

I am pleased to present to you this Annual

Report for the South Australian Department
of Human Services, 2000-2001.

This Annual Report summarises the activities

and achievements of more than 30 000 South

Australians over the past 12 months.

Of necessity, it provides a glimpse of just some

of the hundreds of activities carried out
throughout South Australia in the field of

health, housing and community services over

the past 365 days. These are highlighted in
the Chief Executive s Report.

The mission of the department is to work on
your behalf in providing  access to services that

enhance and protect the health, social wellbeing

and quality of life of South Australians and to
best allocate available resources .

On behalf of all the staff of the department

I commend this report to you as a fair and

accurate representation of the efforts and
achievements of the past year.

With the resources available to us, every single day of

the year Department of Human Services (DHS) staff

help to improve the health, wellbeing and dignity of

hundreds of thousands of South Australians  

throughout all stages of their lives.

DHS, with its responsibility for health, housing,

community and youth services, ageing and disability

services, plays a leading role in making - and keeping -

South Australia a just society.

DHS succeeds in this by focusing on both managing

the demand on its services, as well as by working to

minimise future preventable demand on those

services. DHS called on some of the best minds from

across Australia and overseas to help it plan how to

achieve this balance through participating in the

dynamic and exciting Life Journeys Conference (see

page 21).

Ideas generated by these and other local, national and

international leading thinkers contribute to DHS

policies and the planning cycle.

Current demand on services

In 2000-2001 DHS managed demand on services in

many different ways.

One area where there is a growing demand for

services is mental health and, accordingly, this is a

priority action area for DHS. A new Director of

Mental Health Services for SA, Dr Margaret Tobin,

was appointed on 31 July 2000.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r t 4

Chief Executive s Report

During the past 12 months the Mental Health Action

Plan for Reform was completed and widely

disseminated. The Mental Health Unit has been

restructured and expanded to reflect strategic

directions and priorities and provide leadership and

support for the reform process. Mental Health has

been adopted as a key priority right across the

portfolio.

The Mental Health Communication Strategy is in

place and an Information Development Plan for

Mental Health in SA has been approved.

$1.7 million funding has been invested in IT

infrastructure for community based Mental Health

services in addition to $2.9 million provided over

three years by the Commonwealth to implement the

Commonwealth-State agreement for Mental Health

Information Development.

But unprecedented demand on services is not limited

to mental health. It affects all parts of DHS. One of

our responses has been to invest heavily - $190.067

million - in improving the physical infrastructure

available to serve the community.

Major capital expenditure included:

  The $74 million Stages 2/3A of the Royal

Adelaide Hospital (RAH) redevelopment

commenced with expenditure of $4.168 million

on early works and documentation. Baulderstone

Hornibrook was appointed as construction

manager for these stages, which will upgrade

critical care, emergency, imaging, theatres and

associated clinical facilities over 4 years.

  The $37.4 million Stage 1 of the redevelopment

of The Queen Elizabeth Hospital commenced

with expenditure of $3.683 million. A further

$0.934 million was spent on building demolition.

This stage will provide 200 new inpatient beds to

replace existing wards.

  Stage A of the $87.4 million redevelopment of

Lyell McEwin Health Service commenced with

expenditure of $5.280 million on enabling works

and documentation. This stage will provide new

emergency, imaging, theatre, Intensive Care Unit

and High Dependency Unit wards, Women s

Health Centre and administration facilities.

  Upgrade and replacement of air conditioning at

Glenside Hospital was undertaken at a cost of

$1.552 million. Fire safety was also upgraded at

an additional cost of $217 000.

  There was ongoing construction of the $6.427

million Critical Care Unit at Flinders Medical

Centre with expenditure of $1.245 million in

2000-2001. This project replaces 15 old and 9

temporary beds with a new 24-bed facility.

  The $1.857 million Brain Injury Unit at

Hampstead Centre was completed with

expenditure of $1.604 million in 2000-2001. This

service was transferred from Julia Farr Services.

  The $7.933 million Research building for the

Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science

(IMVS) was completed with expenditure of

$952 000 in 2000-2001.

  Stages 1 to 3 of the $8.6 million Modbury Public

Hospital redevelopment were completed with

expenditure of $3.255 million in 2000-2001.

Documentation of Stage 4 was completed and

went out to tender late in the year. A package of

associated works totalling $1.6 million was also

approved.

  The $6.550 million redevelopment of Noarlunga

Health Service, including expansion of the

emergency services, was progressed with

expenditure of $4.184 million in 2000-2001.

  The $1.4 million redevelopment of the 24-bed

psychiatric facility at the Repatriation General

Hospital (RGH) was completed with expenditure

of $1.179 million in 2000-2001.

  The construction of the new $14.7 million

rehabilitation facility at RGH was completed with

expenditure in 2000-2001 of $1.754 million.

In addition to the investment in physical

infrastructure to support services, extra money was

also put directly into improving the services

themselves.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r t 5

Chief Executive s Report

Making sure we have enough nurses is a key part of

this. To maintain a viable nursing workforce in

metropolitan and rural and remote areas,

recruitment and retention strategies are being

implemented. The most visible part of this strategy has

been a nurse marketing campaign to promote nursing

as a professional career option to teenagers. The

campaign consists of metrolites (bus shelter

advertising), radio commercials, a website, advertising

in Street Press, newspapers, Parent Say magazine and

the SATAC Guide, as well as a video, brochures and

showbags for all secondary schools in the State.

A complementary way of improving services has been

allocating an extra $3.5 million to elective surgery.

The funding has targeted patients who had been

waiting for longer than 6 months to reduce waiting

times. 509 additional procedures were performed

since the initial funding was released in October 2000.

Another example of responding to growing need was

the General Dental Scheme - which allowed

concession card holders to receive treatment from a

participating private dentist. This scheme has reduced

the waiting list from 110 000 in June 2000 to 88 000

in June 2001. This complements the State system for

children. South Australian children have the best oral

health in the OECD.

A further area in which SA leads the way nationally in

responding to urgent medical needs is in encouraging

organ donation. SA has a higher proportion of organ

donors than any other state. This has resulted in

higher rates of kidney transplantation. National

Organ Donor Awareness Week in February 2001

focused on the need for members of the community

to register their donor intention on the Australian

Organ Donation Register. The  Gift of Life  garden

was officially opened by the Governor of South

Australia and the Minister for Human Services during

that Week. The garden was established as an

expression of gratitude and to pay tribute to the

many organ donors and their families for making a

new life possible.

Client feedback   positive and negative - provides our

window on the world. It is a vitally important

component in continuous improvement, as well as in

dealing with people in a fair and equitable manner.

The Health Complaints Bill, which has been tabled in

Parliament, seeks to establish a Commission to process

complaints about the provision of health services

simply and confidentially. The system will cover the

full range of services including public, private and

non-government providers. The Bill enables the

Health Complaints Commissioner to make

recommendations to improve the health system to

reduce the likelihood of similar complaints arising.

Complaints will be dealt with fairly with an emphasis

on conciliation rather than resorting to legal

procedures.

In the housing arena, urban regeneration projects

with a specific focus on public housing were underway

at The Parks and Salisbury North while other urban

renewal projects were on track at Windsor Green,

Lincoln Gardens, Risdon Grove and Mitchell Park.

These projects not only provide more dignified

housing but also help build stronger communities.

The SA Housing Trust was again declared the lowest

cost public housing provider in Australia and also

housed the highest proportion of households with

special needs. For the third consecutive year SAHT

had the highest customer satisfaction rating of all

states.

South Australia will have a Social Welfare Services

Planning Framework by the end of the year. The

framework will centre on the services provided for

youth and families through the department, as well as

services and funding provided across the non-

government sector that services this client group. It

will establish key directions for DHS in supporting the

needs of children, young people and their families

over the next three years.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r t 6

Chief Executive s Report

DHS Life Journeys Expo 2001

The expo featured displays providing information in 4 life stages -

babies and children, youth, adults and older people.

(clockwise from bottom right)

Health Checks in the form of Finger Prick Blood Cholesterol and

Physical Fitness were there to help people make healthy life choices.

Young and old alike scaled the Rockclimbing wall, and the Duke of

Edinburgh Awards presented Canoeing on the River Torrens.

SHine SA (Sexual Health Information, Networking and Education) staff

and volunteers presented their PASH program (Planned Approach to

Sexual Health) for young people.

Preventative action

Preventative action involves helping people to make

healthy life choices. One healthy life choice is

immunisation. The level of immunisation for children

has increased by 3% to 92% for one-year-olds and by

10% to 88% for two-year-olds in the last 12 months.

Flu vaccine coverage for people aged 65 years and over

increased by 3.4% to 80.5% for the 2000 flu season and

SA had the second highest flu vaccination level in

Australia. The SA Vaccine Distribution Centre

distributed 1.2 million doses of vaccine to children,

adolescents and older people through 950 surgeries and

clinics, hospitals, Aboriginal health services, community

health and councils during 2000-2001.

A creative and entertaining way in which DHS

encouraged healthy living was its free Life Journeys

Expo at the Adelaide Convention Centre in April 2001.

It was structured on four major life stages  Babies and

Children, Youth, Adults and Older People   creating a

stimulating and interactive environment.

The Expo focused on healthy living, providing

information to the public on positive life choices. It was

therefore an investment in preventing disease and social

dysfunction and promoting the health and wellbeing of

the community through promoting positive,

preventative choices by engaging with people personally.

Around 6500 people participated across the two days.

DHS has an obligation to provide community leadership

in reconciliation and the Expo was supported by the

simultaneous community reconciliation event,

Taikurringga Yerta. This was successful beyond our most

optimistic expectations, with more than 20 000 people

demonstrating their support of Aboriginal

Reconciliation. Taikurringga Yerta - Kaurna for  In

Common Land  - was organised by DHS in partnership

with the Adelaide City Council; Adelaide University;

Channel 10; Homestart; Department of Primary

Industry and Resources; Department of Environment

and Heritage; Department of State Aboriginal Affairs;

Department of Education, Training and Employment;

and community groups.

It delivered an event of International standard

including live entertainment, arts and craftworks. The

event received positive media coverage.

Reaching out to people through the conference,

Expo, the Community Reconciliation event and

participating in other community events such as the

Royal Adelaide Show complements health promotion,

parenting and other advertising campaigns and

encourages people to seek out the services of DHS

preventative units such as BreastScreen SA.

A record number of women is being screened for

breast cancer in South Australia and the free

BreastScreen SA service is acknowledged as the  gold

standard  in Australia.

In the 2000-2001 financial year, BreastScreen SA

performed 67 737 screening mammograms. From

January 1989 to December 2000 the program

detected 2826 breast cancers, a significant proportion

of which were early stage cancers, with a good

prognosis for simpler treatment and cure.

To December 2000, 64.7% of women in the target

group (50 to 69 years) participated in the program

over a 24-month period (the recommended screening

interval). The national target is 70%.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r t 7

Chief Executive s Report



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r t 8

Figures from the South Australian Cancer Registry

Report (2000) showed that in 1997-99 there was a

20% reduction in deaths from breast cancer in South

Australian women in the target group (50 to 69 years

of age) compared to the preceding 10-year period.

Education, early detection through breast cancer

screening and improvements in treatment of breast

cancer contributed to this achievement.

The SA Cervix Screening program has also

significantly reduced the incidence and deaths from

cervical cancer in SA women.

The Program is working towards a 70% participation

in regular 2-year screening by all women in the target

population of women aged 18-70. Particular efforts

have been made to increase participation in under-

screened groups including older women. This has

resulted in an increase in screening rates over the

1999-2000 period.

Screening among younger age groups has fallen

slightly, indicating a need to maintain recruitment

efforts for women of all ages.

Food safety is another important aspect of illness

prevention. DHS prepared a Food Bill that has been

passed by Parliament, based on a national model

which aims to promote uniformity of food laws

throughout Australia and New Zealand. New

national Food Safety Standards will be adopted under

the legislation. These Standards are expected to be

phased in during 2002. DHS will administer a special

$1.8 million budget allocation over the next two

years to support an implementation plan including

strategies for consultation and communication with

industry and local government.

The five-year homeless strategic plan,  A Place to Live ,

is based on ten Key Directions that set out DHS s

response to homelessness. These are:

  Prevention and Early Intervention

  Affordable and appropriate housing options

  Access to integrated services linked to individual

needs

  Flexible care and support services

  Responses to the range of needs for specific

population groups

  Appropriate and timely responses for children

and young people accompanying adults who are

homeless

  Stronger communities through capacity building

  Integrated working relationships

  Improved planning and funding arrangements

  Improved performance, knowledge and skills in

addressing homelessness.

 A Place to Live  builds on the work outlined in the

Supported Accommodation Assistance Program

(SAAP IV) agreement, placing homelessness in a

broader context and setting in place some new

thinking about partnerships and collaboration that

can deliver improved outcomes for homeless people.

2000-2001 was a year of productive action, with the

community beginning to reap the tangible benefits of

the integration of planning for services across the

different parts of DHS.

I thank DHS staff for their work, together with their

clients and community partners, in visibly

transforming SA communities.

The contribution of people across the portfolio

continues to be outstanding. We are acutely aware of

our responsibilities to provide excellent services to

South Australians, to support strong communities and

to contribute to the State s quality of life.

Christine Charles

Chief Executive

Adelaide, September 2001

Chief Executive s Report



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r t 9

  Adoption Act 1988

  Aged Citizens Clubs (Subsidies) Act 1963

  Blood Contaminants Act 1985

  Children s Protection Act 1993

  Chiropodists Act 1950

  Chiropractors Act 1991

  Commonwealth and State Housing Agreement
Act 1945

  Commonwealth and State Housing Supplemental
Agreement Act 1954

  Consent to Medical Treatment and Palliative
Care Act 1995

  Controlled Substances Act 1984

  Dentists Act 1984

  Disability Services Act 1993

  Drugs Act 1908

  Family and Community Services Act 1972

  Food Act 1985

  Guardianship and Administration Act 1993

  Health Professionals (Special Events Exemption)
Act, 2000

  Hospitals Act 1934

  Housing Agreement Act 1991

  Housing and Urban Development (Administrative
Arrangements) Act 1995

  Housing Improvement Act 1940

  Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science Act
1982

  Medical Practitioners Act 1983

  Mental Health Act 1993

  Occupational Therapists Act 1974

  Office for the Ageing Act 1995

  Optometrists Act 1920

  Pharmacists Act 1991

  Physiotherapists Act 1991

  Psychological Practices Act 1973

  Public and Environmental Health Act 1987

  Public Charities Funds Act 1935

  Public Intoxication Act 1984

  Radiation Protection and Control Act 1982

  Reproductive Technology Act 1988

  Retirement Villages Act, 1987

  Sexual Re-assignment Act, 1988, Part 2 (note
these powers and functions were conferred on
the Minister for Human Services on 17 August
2000 pursuant to the Administrative
Arrangements Act, 1994)

  South Australian Co-operative and Community
Housing Act 1991

  South Australian Health Commission Act 1976

  South Australian Housing Trust Act 1995

  Supported Residential Facilities Act 1992

  Tobacco Products Regulation Act 1997 (Note: on
5/6/97 the Treasurer delegated powers and
functions in Part 5 (Sections 63 and 65) and Part
7 (Section 76 and sub-section 85(1)(a) to the
Minister for Human Services pursuant to s72 of
the Tobacco Products Regulation Act, 1997)

  Transplantation and Anatomy Act 1983

Ministerial Portfolio Responsibilities
Acts administered



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r t 10

  Anti-Tobacco Ministerial Advisory Task Force

  Charitable and Social Welfare Fund Board

  Child Health Advisory Committee

  Children s Interests Bureau

  Children s Protection Advisory Panel

  Chiropody Board of South Australia

  Chiropractors Board of South Australia

  Clinical Dental Technicians Registration
Committee

  Commissioners of Charitable Funds

  Controlled Substances Advisory Council

  Coordinating Committee for Advisory Bodies for
Children

  Dental Board of South Australia

  Dental Professional Conduct Tribunal

  Disability Advisory Council of SA

  Drug Assessment and Aid Panel

  Duke of Edinburgh Award State Award
Committee

  Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund Committee

  Grants for Seniors Advisory Committee

  Guardianship Board

  Home and Community Care Ministerial Advisory
Committee

  HomeStart Finance Board

  Housing Advisory Council Community
Committee

  Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science
Council

  Medical Board of South Australia

  Medical Practitioners Professional Conduct
Tribunal

  Ministerial Advisory Board on Ageing

  Nurses Board of South Australia

  Occupational Therapists Registration
Board of South Australia

  Optical Dispensers Registration Committee

  Optometrists Board

  Pharmacy Board of South Australia

  Physiotherapists Board of South Australia

  Public and Environmental Health Council

  Public Housing Appeal Panel

  Radiation Protection Committee

  Retirement Villages Advisory Committee

  South Australian Aboriginal Housing Authority
Board

  South Australian Community Housing Authority

  South Australian Council on Reproductive
Technology

  South Australian Health Commission

  South Australian Housing Trust Board

  South Australian Psychological Board

  Supported Residential Facilities Advisory
Committee

  The Parks (Westwood) Urban Renewal Project
Committee

Boards and Committees
Boards and Committees reporting to the Minister for Human Services, the Minister for Disability
Services or the Minister for the Ageing at 30 June 2001



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 11

Department of Human Services
     Overview

Functions and objectives

The Department of Human Services (DHS) was

formed as part of a major restructure of the public

sector in South Australia, designed to coordinate

planning across the state and to build links across

government and partnerships with the South

Australian community. The Human Services Portfolio

integrates health, housing and community services,

creating opportunities for integration and

collaboration and to continually improve service

delivery for South Australians. It is committed to

working for families and children, youth, older

people, the mentally ill, those with disabilities, and

people from culturally and linguistically diverse

backgrounds. It has a particular commitment to

making a difference for Aboriginal people and

communities. It delivers services within the framework

of its 1999-2002 Strategic Plan, which includes the

following mission, vision and values statements:

Mission statement

The role of DHS is to support the Minister for

Human Services and the Minister for Disability

Services and Minister for the Ageing, in providing

access to services that enhance and protect the health,

social wellbeing and quality of life of South

Australians and to best allocate available resources.

Vision statement

To significantly enhance the quality of life and

safeguard the health and wellbeing of South

Australians by leading the development of high

performing integrated health, housing and

community services for individuals, families and

communities. To achieve this vision the DHS will:

  provide a coordinated response to human service

needs with a focus on wellbeing, illness

prevention, safety, housing, early intervention

and the provision of quality care

  foster strong partnerships with the community

and service providers to promote resilient, caring

and productive communities

  encourage individuals, families and communities

to take responsibility for their own health and

wellbeing

  ensure it takes a holistic approach based on

principles of justice and equity.

Values statement

The DHS shares the following values:

Leadership

  to strive for leadership of the highest quality

  to set clear direction, achieve results and manage

performance

Excellent service

  to work in partnership with others to achieve the

best possible outcomes for individuals, families

and communities

  to be responsive and tolerant

  to show good judgment

Respect

  to treat staff and clients with courtesy, dignity and

respect at all times

  to value diversity in all its forms and act in accord

with the principles of access and equity.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 12

The alignment of all portfolio plans to this plan is of

priority to the department. The following initiatives

are planned to ensure the alignment of all plans

developed by DHS funded services:

  Development of the DHS portfolio planning

framework

  Conduct of workshops, provision of advice and

editorial support by the Strategic Development

Unit

  Development of a DHS Communication Strategy

  Development of a DHS Service Excellence

Framework to articulate the expectations of the

department in the context of the Portfolio

Strategic Plan.

Through the Strategic Plan the DHS has committed

itself to:

  ensuring community access to high quality and

timely services

  ensuring adequate health and physical protection

balanced with appropriate use of support services

  ensuring the protection of children and family

support

  providing housing services and assistance

  developing supportive communities

  maximising value for money and effectiveness of

service delivery

  reflecting South Australian priorities in

Commonwealth/State relations

  minimising government regulation while

maintaining adequate service standards

  communicating government policy clearly to the

community

  setting performance requirements for public and

private providers.

Five Strategic Directions are listed in the plan and are

the foundations for successfully achieving the key

outcomes of the Human Services Portfolio. They are

the pathway supporting and underpinning the

mission and vision of the portfolio, and are

underpinned themselves by the portfolio s stated

values.

The five Key Strategic Directions outlined in the

1999-2002 Strategic Plan are:

1. Improving services for better outcomes.

2. Increasing the State s capacity to promote quality

of life.

3. Redistributing resources in a changing

environment.

4. Strengthening a culture of working together.

5. Providing sound management.

The initiatives and achievements for the DHS and

South Australian Health Commission (SAHC) are

reported against these Strategic Directions.

As the existing Strategic Plan is in its third and final

year, it is currently under review to ensure a new plan

is launched in early 2002. A series of community

consultation workshops is underway inviting portfolio

staff, constituent agencies and the community to

provide feedback on the current plan and suggestions

of priorities for the next three years. A Factfile is

being developed as part of an environmental scan.

The outcomes of the DHS Life Journeys Conference

have been documented and will also be used in

formulating the plan. A draft plan will be developed

and distributed for consultation towards the end of

2001.

 Overview



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 13

Human Services Portfolio Structure

Minister for Human Services

Hon Dean Brown MP

Minister for Disability Services

Minister for the Ageing

Hon Robert Lawson QC MLC

Chief Executive
Christine Charles

Executive Director

Metropolitan

(Incorporating Primary

and Aged Care;

Housing and Community

Services)

Tom Stubbs

Executive Director

Country and Disability

Services

(Incorporating FAYS)

Roxanne Ramsey

Executive Director

Statewide

Brendon Kearney

Executive Director

Aboriginal Services

Brian Dixon

Executive Director

Strategic Planning and

Policy

Jim Davidson

Acting Chief Information Officer

Information Management Services

Ian Halkett

Director

Corporate Services

Rod Bishop

Director

Financial Services

Frank Turner

Director

Asset Services

Peter Jackson

Service Providers

Health Housing Community
Services



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 14

1 Improving Services
          for Better Outcomes

Strategic Direction

A primary focus of Human Services is the planning

and delivery of services that are driven by the

needs of families and individuals. The integrated
portfolio, which incorporates health, housing and

community services, offers opportunities to plan

and respond more effectively to complex and
diverse community needs.

Focus on communications

During the year under review the department

adopted a new communications strategy which

focuses on five key themes: mental health, access to

services, reconciliation, disability and food quality.

The strategy recognises the role of coordinated

communications in promoting healthy living and

managing demand for services.

One of the department s major communications

initiatives during the year was the launch of a health

and wellbeing website: HealthySA

(www.healthysa.sa.gov.au). HealthySA has proved

extremely popular, attracting over one million  hits 

during its first year. The most popular categories of

information requested through the site are  women 

(12%),  babies and children  (also 12%),  men  (10%)

and  mental health  (4%).

Significant improvements were made during the year

to the department s communications infrastructure

including further development of data networks and

leading-edge network computer technology in several

service delivery areas. This infrastructure is

supporting the development and deployment of

clinical and service delivery systems and significant

improvements in access to business applications and

communications facilities. The department s network

computer initiative was recognised with a national

information technology productivity award.

The major service delivery program to be facilitated by

the enhanced data networks is CareConnect, which is

supported by the OACIS clinical information system.

During the year the department progressed a five-year

program to extend CareConnect from renal services to

all clinical areas of the eight major hospitals.

Country and Disability Services

Community care support models for Mental Health

Supported Accommodation are being established in

Victor Harbor, Whyalla and the SE region to

demonstrate:

  more efficient and effective use of psychiatric

beds

  increased capacity to support consumers in their

communities

  development of the capacity of the non-

government sector to provide support and care

services.

An integrated service to implement the Domiciliary

Care Review model has been established in the

Gawler, Mid North and Wakefield regions, which will:

  create a streamlined common access and

assessment process for ageing, disability, palliative

care, post acute care and mental health services

  specify in broad terms the balance of emphasis

between health promotion, early intervention

and higher level services

  move toward an integrated community service

approach to service access and service delivery

  stabilise and streamline the funding coming into a

particular region on the basis of agreed outputs.

$4.045 million of Commonwealth Ageing carers

funds and $686,562 of new State funds have been

distributed to provide respite for carers.

$1 432 806 of State funding has been directed

towards providing supported accommodation places

for 89 people with disabilities while nine homes have

been purchased to enable 27 people from Strathmont

Centre to move to the community and 25 people

have moved out of the Julia Farr Centre into 5

bedroom community homes. A Julia Farr Eligibility

Committee has been established to vet admissions to

the Centre and secure appropriate community

placement, where possible.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 15

1 Strategic Direction 1: Improving Services for Better OutcomesHousehold Assistant Program
This program supports women who have given birth

at the Lyell McEwin Health Service and their families

by providing home duties during the transition from

hospital to home following early discharge. It will

provide training and employment opportunities for

young people, experience in parenting skills and

support the development of community networks.

Agenda for children in the northern
metropolitan area

This is a 3-5 year plan directed at improving service

delivery, integration and coordination to achieve

better health and wellbeing outcomes. The Agenda

links to other major initiatives in the region such as

the Playford Partnership, the Community Link

Centre proposal for Elizabeth, the Stable

Accommodation Project and the FAYS High Risk

Infants Project.

Teenage pregnancy and parenthood

A partnership approach has been established with

SHine SA and other key constituents to reduce the

rate of unplanned teenage pregnancy and improve

support to young people in their parenting role.

Comprehensive research is first being undertaken to

generate knowledge about the views of young women

regarding their circumstances, needs and services.

High need groups have been identified as Aboriginal

young women, vulnerable/marginalised young women

and those in the  younger  teenage years.

ParentingSA

ParentingSA s objective is to promote the importance

of the role of parenting, raise the profile of parenting

and promote its value. It provides support to parents

to build on their knowledge, skills and confidence and

supplies information, education and training.

Emergency accommodation and
community initiatives in the southern
metropolitan area

The DHS report into crisis accommodation needs in

the southern metropolitan area,  Just More Houses

or Better Housing Outcomes? , was released in August

2000.

Approximately $1 million dollars will be invested to

address the Report s recommendations - including

recognising the need for more housing in the region

and more effective use of resources.

$200,000 has been made available to expand the

Hackham West Community Centre and improve

facilities, matched by the City of Onkaparinga. The

Centre conducts 56 regular programs, is used by

1200 residents a week and operates a community

development model considered to be a benchmark in

South Australia.

In another program involving the City of

Onkaparinga, a further $200 000 has been made

available for capital works to establish a Youth

Enterprise Centre supported by a Youth Enterprise

Worker who will conduct leadership training with

young people in the Aldinga/Sellicks area. A major

focus of the facility will be developing linkages with

local tourism, retail and agricultural businesses to help

young people find jobs.

Drug programs

A toll free number (1300 131340) is now available

for reporting needles and syringes found in public

places, receiving advice on how to deal with

needlestick injury and obtaining information on the

safe disposal of needles and syringes.

A specialist Drug Court has been established to deal

with offenders with drug problems. Participants may

be directed into treatment and support programs as

an alternative to imprisonment. This approach is

aimed at curtailing illicit drug use, along with the

criminal activity that accompanies it.

Additional outreach workers have been employed by

the Drug and Alcohol Services Council (DASC) to

expand its Specialist Treatment Services and provide

specialist drug and alcohol services on an outpatient

basis. In October 2000 DASC also extended its drug

substitution therapy services with the opening of the

Southern Clinic at Christies Beach.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 16

Strategic Direction 1: Improving Services for Better Outcomes1 Mental Health partnerships
A draft Consumer &amp; Carer Partnership framework

has been developed in collaboration with Mental

Health Consumers and Carers. The final

endorsement process has commenced.

Primary Mental Health care strategy

Joint Planning has commenced with SA Divisions of

General Practice to develop a model of collaborative

practice.

Capacity of non-government sector to
support Mental Health reforms

Collaboration with Non-Government Organisations

(NGOs) has commenced and the first pilot in

Supported Accommodation models (to provide

housing and psychiatric disability support services in

Salisbury area) is also underway.

Better service outcomes for people
with Mental Health needs

A policy framework for Mental Health Reform in SA

has been approved and is being implemented.

  The Mental Health Quality &amp; Safety Council (a

sub committee of the Statewide Division s Quality

Council) is in the planning stage.

  The clinical Governance Strategy has commenced.

  A critical incidents and complaints management

system was established.

  Psychiatric Emergency Demand Management:

the strategy is in place and funding for education

and training components finalised.

Clinical service planning studies

A series of comprehensive, integrated Metropolitan

Clinical Planning Studies have been developed to

meet the challenges of increasing technology, the

ageing population, increased demand on services and

higher costs.

Implementation plans have been completed and

launched for Healthy Start (Obstetrics and

Gynaecology), Renal and Urology Services and

Emergency Services. Implementation plans are being

developed for Cancer, Cardiac and Intensive Care

Services and are soon to be launched. Plans are also

being developed for Rehabilitation and Burns. These

initiatives will improve the focus of primary care and

improve collaboration across the continuum of care.

Elective surgery strategy

An additional $3.5 million has been allocated for

elective surgery in 2000-2001, increasing to $5.0

million in 2001-2002. This is targeted at long wait

hip/knee replacement, cataract procedures and

paediatric ENT patients. A further $1 million was

allocated to country regions to reduce surgical waiting

times, also in selected procedures.

In addition, ongoing audits are maintained of patient

cancellations and overdue patients. The funding

targets patients who have been waiting for longer

than 6 months to reduce waiting times. An additional

509 procedures have been performed since the initial

funding was released in October 2000.

$2 million was allocated to metropolitan hospitals in

July 2000 to manage the winter peak in bed demand.

On the most recent figures (three months ending

June 2001), admission times were:

Category 1 (urgent):

87% within the nominated period of 30 days

Category 2 (semi-urgent):

85.8% within the nominated period of 90 days

Category 3 (non-urgent):

93.5% within 12 months.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 17

Strategic Direction 1: Improving Services for Better Outcomes

SA Dental Service

South Australian children now have the best oral

health in the OECD - achieved through the

combination of water fluoridation and an effective

School Dental Service.

The adult situation is less satisfactory and SA Dental

Service has implemented a number of programs to

address the issue. These include the General Dental

Scheme which allows concession card holders to

receive treatment from a participating private dentist.

This has reduced the waiting list from 110 000 in

June 2000 to 88 000 in June 2001. Use of technology

has also extended the accessibility of dental care and

reduced clerical costs.

Local evidence of an emerging national dental

workforce shortage is becoming apparent in the rural

areas of SA. An innovative response has commenced

through a partnership with Adelaide University and

the Australian Dental Association to form the

 Limestone Coast Partnership  in the South East

of the State.

Integrated Community Planning

Integrated Community Planning establishes a

framework for integrated service delivery across the

three portfolio areas of health, housing and

community services. Agreed priorities are identified

and partnerships strengthened at the local level to

ensure that human service needs of country

communities are met in a flexible, creative and

meaningful manner.

Moving Ahead

The Strategic Plan for Older Persons is in its third year

of implementation. A performance-reporting

framework for the plan has been enhanced to include

key performance indicators. Further work is

underway to collate data on new initiatives that have

been prompted by the plan. The performance

information indicates that there has been increased

investment in prevention and early intervention

strategies and a reduction in  nursing home type 

acute services activity (i.e. stay of greater than 35

days) in SA metropolitan hospitals. There is evidence

that there are more step-down and transition

services available to older people since the inception

of the plan.

1



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 18

Strategic Direction 1: Improving Services for Better Outcomes1 Men s health and wellbeing
Over 40 consultations (20 in rural and remote areas)

were held with key organisations, service providers

and the community to inform and direct a

comprehensive policy and planning framework. Work

on the development of men s health and wellbeing

policy and planning framework will continue in 2001-

2002 with an allocation of $100 000.

On average, men living in country areas have poorer

health, lower life expectancy and use general

practitioners (GPs) less than men living in capital cities.

The rates of mortality/morbidity are also higher for

injury, suicide, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Successful programs in Laura and Kimba have

demonstrated that a major impact can be achieved

with moderate funding in educating and changing

men s behaviour in seeking health support. Extending

and sustaining this type of program throughout

country South Australia will achieve significant

improvements in health and wellbeing outcomes for

men.

Women s health and wellbeing

A review of roles and structures to best achieve the

desired outcomes in relation to women s health and

wellbeing has been undertaken through the Strategic

Planning and Policy (SPP) Division. An organisational

review of Women s Health Statewide is underway to

examine the most effective ways of responding to

women s needs. A re-orientation of the committees

and centrally funded positions of the National

Women s Health Program and policy directions in

women s health have been occurring.

The portfolio continues in its commitment to the DHS

Women s Health and Wellbeing Policy and Planning

Framework. The framework will provide strategic

directions and promote comprehensive responses to:

  improving health and wellbeing of women -

focusing on those most in need

  ensuring responsive, accessible, comprehensive

human services are provided.

As part of the process, a Women s Health and

Wellbeing Consultation Paper was developed and

distributed to constituents across the State. This Paper

identifies major health and wellbeing issues for

women and highlights key population groups of

women. Statewide consultation was conducted in

metropolitan and country regions with key service

providers, peak agencies and women s service sector

representatives.

Public housing

The waiting list for SAHT housing has decreased from

43 520 in 1991 to 24 700 at the end of June 2001

and applicants in greatest need were housed in less

than six months.

During the year, 70% of SAHT housing (1971

households) was allocated to the two highest

categories of need.

Social rental housing stock numbers, including

properties within the community and Aboriginal

housing sectors, fell from 64 151 in 1993-94 to a

projected 56 382 in 2000-2001. While public housing

stock has declined by 16% over the past ten years,

Aboriginal housing stock has increased by 15%.

Community housing stock has increased by 85%.

Since 1996-97, 889 properties have been transferred

to the community housing sector.

The SAHT was again declared the lowest cost public

housing provider in Australia and also housed the

highest proportion of households with special needs.

For the third consecutive year SAHT had the highest

customer satisfaction rating of all states.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 19

Profile of SA Housing Trust Customer
Need Groups

Private Rental
Allocations  Assistance

Need Waiting List  of houses provided

Groups as at 30.6.01 during 00-01 in 00-01

%%%%% %%%%% %%%%%

Low Income 93.54 97.33 94.54

Youth 26.33 25.47 35.96

People with a Disability 12.63 25.72 8.60

CLDB* 14.94 10.82 14.16

Aged 5.49 9.43 1.95

Mental Health 4.89 11.64 3.86

Aboriginal 3.03 7.01 4.27

Homeless 4.85 7.81 7.13

Domestic Violence 3.32 5.91 6.31

Large Families** 1.32 3.09 1.96

Totals (no. of customers) 24 700  4050 37 000

*People from Cultural &amp; Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds

** Customers with four or more dependent children

Note: The majority of Trust customers have complex needs and therefore may

appear in more than one need category

Aboriginal Housing Authority (AHA)

The Aboriginal Housing Authority (AHA) has a

budget of $7.8 million that provides for rural and

remote housing and the Aboriginal Housing Rental

Program. In 2000-2001, 22 new rental and rural and

remote houses will be built, 18 rental properties will

be purchased and 154 properties will be improved

and upgraded.

Aboriginal people have some of the lowest rates of

home ownership in Australia. A pilot program

developed in conjunction with HomeStart Finance

will offer home ownership to 50 Aboriginal families in

Adelaide and rural centres enabling them to buy the

home they are currently renting.

The AHA has entered into a commercial arrangement

with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Commission (ATSIC), matching National Aboriginal

Health Strategy (NAHS) housing funds and delivering

NAHS project management services for ATSIC, thus

ensuring that AHA delivers all Aboriginal community

housing in South Australia.

43 houses will be replaced in the first four projects, 21

funded by NAHS and 22 by the AHA. The new

houses will each have three bedrooms, replacing one-

and two-bedroom homes. Planning is underway for

similar projects.

The AHA implemented an Aboriginal Home

Ownership Pilot Program in July 1999 and since its

inception nine tenants have purchased their

properties, six in the metropolitan area and three in

the country. This level of enquiries is encouraging and

indicates there is a strong desire within the Aboriginal

community to participate in home ownership -

though increased market value remains a barrier.

The pilot period and Memorandum of Understanding

for the Gladys Elphick Hostel have been extended

until 31 May 2002, during which time the Aboriginal

Hostels Limited (AHL) and AHA will develop formal

referral, monitoring, evaluation and review processes,

as well as service models to ensure inter-agency

collaboration and linkages to support clients at the

hostel in determining short and long term housing

needs, and upon entering public housing with AHA.

Information Management Services organised a

program at Tandanya to raise awareness of managing

traditional knowledge within Aboriginal communities,

both past and present.

HomeStart

HomeStart Finance s Business and Strategic Plan

2000-2001 set goals to enable the organisation to

increase home ownership among low-income

households across South Australia. One of the

strategies employed to meet this objective has been to

maximise the uptake of the First Home Owner Grant.

A continued focus on households which would

otherwise be unable to secure home finance, on

communities with special needs and reducing pressure

on the private rental market have also contributed to

the overall management of the year s business

activities.

HomeStart has continued to provide government

with significant dividends of $1.6 million throughout

the year, whilst injecting $2.3 billion into the state s

property industry.

Strategic Direction 1: Improving Services for Better Outcomes1



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 20

Strategic Direction 1: Improving Services for Better Outcomes1 Homelessness
The five-year homeless strategic plan,  A Place to Live ,

is based on ten Key Directions that set out DHS s

response to homelessness. These are:

  Prevention and Early Intervention

  Affordable and appropriate housing options

  Access to integrated services linked to individual

needs

  Flexible care and support services

  Responses to the range of needs for specific

population groups

  Appropriate and timely responses for children

and young people accompanying adults who are

homeless

  Stronger communities through capacity building

  Integrated working relationships

  Improved planning and funding arrangements

  Improved performance, knowledge and skills in

addressing homelessness.

 A Place to Live  builds on the work outlined in the

Supported Accommodation Assistance Program

(SAAP IV) agreement, placing homelessness in a

broader context and setting in place some new

thinking about partnerships and collaboration that

can deliver improved outcomes for homeless people.

Vulnerable adults

 Towards a Service Coordination Framework for

Vulnerable Adults in the Inner City  is a ten-point

strategy to improve coordination and service

response to homeless adults. Strategies include:

  $3.1 million refurbishment of the St Vincent De

Paul Night Shelter for homeless men

  Establishing a Stabilisation Facility for adults with

chronic alcohol/drug dependencies

  Expanding the City Homeless Assessment Team

(CHAST)

  Developing an Aged Care residential facility for

older homeless people.

The department has established a Homeless Task

Force to initiate a collaborative inter-agency response

to families and individuals sleeping rough and has

been successful in finding accommodation for a

number of homeless people.

Gambling

The last year has seen a major emphasis on gambling

policy by the Commonwealth and State Governments.

A Ministerial Council on Gambling (MCG) has been

established, chaired by the Commonwealth Minister

for Family and Community Services. The Prime

Minister referred gambling to the November meeting

of the Council of Australian Governments. DHS has

played a major role in these developments as SA

chairs the Gambling Working Party established by the

Community Services Ministers Conference. Research

is underway to overcome the lack of knowledge of

effective strategies for the treatment and prevention

of problem gambling. The Community Services

Ministers Advisory Council was represented on the

MCG Research Working Party.

Community Health

A comprehensive review of Metropolitan Community

Health Services was completed in May 2001. The

recommendations of the Review have been endorsed

by DHS and implementation has commenced. The

principal findings of the review were that, although

Community Health Services provide a comprehensive

range of services, a collaborative approach between

the services and other community based health,

housing and community welfare agencies would

improve the impact of services.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 21

Increasing the State s Capacity to

Promote Quality of Life
2 Strategic Direction

The Human Services portfolio promotes and
creates a healthy, caring, safe and tolerant

community consistent with the Government s

objective of enhancing the quality of life for
South Australians.

Focus on communications

During the year the department undertook a number

of communications initiatives to address public health

issues and promote healthy living.

The highlights of the year were a Life Journeys Expo

and a Conference in April/May. Around 6500

members of the community attended the Expo which

focused on healthy living and positive life choices for

the four major life stages: babies and children, youth,

adults and older people. About 200 volunteers and

150 human services agencies supported the event

which encouraged participation in a range of

activities, entertainments and health screening

opportunities.

The Expo weekend wound up with a major

reconciliation event, a public concert sponsored by the

department. Named Taikurringga-Yerta, the concert

brought together a large number of Aboriginal

performers including special guests Jimmy Little, Vika &amp;

Linda and Christine Anu. The alcohol-free, smoke-free

concert was attended by an estimated crowd of 20 000

people including what was said to be the largest ever

gathering of Aboriginal people in Adelaide.

The Life Journeys theme continued into a conference

hosted by the department to address the theme of

 What type of society do we want in the 21st

Century?  Over 350 delegates participated in

discussions and activities over three days. Keynote

speakers included Sir Paul Reeves, Professor Lowitja

O Donoghue, Senator Amanda Vanstone, Dr Barry

Jones and Dr Peter Ellyard.

The Life Journeys theme continued with visits of

 mini-Expos  to two suburban shopping centres to

promote healthy life-styles and give shoppers

opportunities to see plans for the redevelopment of

local hospital facilities.

The year also saw significant development of the

department s information services including

HealthySA and the first stages of the development of

 Human Services Online  which will provide

consumers with interactive information on services

across the human services sector in South Australia.

Services to the Aboriginal community

DHS and service agencies are working towards

improving service outcomes for Aboriginal people

with disabilities. This includes a requirement through

Funding and Service Agreements for agencies to have

an Aboriginal inclusion policy.

In Coober Pedy, the Umoona community is involved

in the establishment of the local Regional Health

Service to improve access to hospital and health

services. A similar service is being established in

Ceduna.

DHS is a partner with the Attorney General s

Department in implementing the Coober Pedy

alcohol misuse strategy with a focus on Aboriginal

people; and a youth drug diversion initiative has a

focus on petrol sniffing in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara

(AP) lands.

A workshop was held in conjunction with an

Aboriginal Disability Advisory group to raise

awareness of recreational opportunities which

promote the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal

people with disabilities. DSO is working with the

Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged

Care to assist younger Aboriginal people with

disabilities who are living in aged care facilities to

secure more appropriate accommodation.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 22



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 23

Immunisation

The levels of immunisation for children has increased

by 3% to 92% for one-year-olds and by 10% to 88%

for two-year-olds in the last 12 months.

Flu vaccine coverage for people aged 65 years and

over increased by 3.4% to 80.5% for the 2000 flu

season and SA had the second highest flu vaccination

level in Australia. The SA Vaccine Distribution Centre

distributed 1.2 million doses of vaccine to children,

adolescents and the elderly through 950 surgeries

and clinics, hospitals, Aboriginal health services,

community health and councils during 2000-2001.

Vaccine wastage has been reduced to 2.4% of all doses

distributed compared with the national target of

10%. Most wastage was due to cold-chain failure

(usually inadvertent freezing) while stored at GP

surgeries.

HIV infection

Since 1985, 771 individuals had been diagnosed with

HIV infection in SA up to 31st March 2001, 704

(91%) males and 67 (9%) females. Of the males, 536

(76%) reported male-to-male sexual contact, 56 (8%)

reported injecting drug use and 30 (4%) reported

both risk factors. Injecting drug use was reported by

23 (34%) females diagnosed with HIV infection and

38 (57%) reported heterosexual transmission. During

the first quarter of 2001, 13 433 HIV screening tests

were performed; 5771 (43%) on males, 7577 (56%)

on females, and 85 tests on individuals whose sex was

not reported.

Taikurringga Yerta (In Common Land) Reconciliation Event 2001

The crowd enjoying the sun, music and atmosphere of the

Department of Human Services  Reconciliation Event. The sea of

hands represents a symbol of unification for Australians.

(clockwise from right)

Karl Telfer, Kaurna traditional owner, passing down knowledge to the

next generation.

DHS staff lending a hand at the Family &amp; Youth Services information

stall at the Taikurringga Yerta Reconciliation Event April 2001

DHS Life Journeys National Conference 2001

Christine Charles  opening address at the DHS Life Journeys National

Conference. The conference theme was  What type of society do we

want in the 21st Century? .

The Closing Ceremony featured CASM (Centre for Aboriginal Studies in

Music) and Holdfast Bay Choirs.

A Paiyta Dance Group member performing  Welcome to Country  in the

Opening Ceremony for the Conference.

Hepatitis C notifications

In the first quarter of 2001, medical notifications of

hepatitis C infection were received for 283

individuals, 197 (70%) males and 86 (30%) females.

Medical notification data show 256 (90%) individuals

were newly diagnosed with hepatitis C infection

during this period, while 27 individuals had earlier

positive tests. 39 individuals reported a previous

negative test - more than 12 months earlier in 24

cases and within the last year in 15 cases. In 109 cases

the testing history was unknown. Past or present

injecting drug use was reported as a likely

transmission route for hepatitis C virus in 188 (73%)

cases. At the time of diagnosis, males covered a broad

age range (89%, 20-49 years), while most females

(63%) were in the 20 to 39 age groups. Eight females

and four males were aged less than 20 years at

diagnosis; all had a history of injecting drug use.

Related projects and strategies

The HIV, Hepatitis C and Related Programs Unit

funded projects to the value of $2 382 500 at eight

community based organisations and agencies

incorporated under the South Australian Health

Commission Act.

The Fourth South Australian HIV Strategy and the

First South Australian Hepatitis C Strategy are being

developed.

Diabetes management

A Strategic Plan for Diabetes in South Australia and a

framework for management are being implemented

by a Diabetes Advisory Committee. A diabetes

management plan based on the successful Hills/Mallee

model is being established in the southern

metropolitan region following consultation with local

GPs, hospitals, community groups and professional

networks.

Achievements reported so far in country SA include:

  Better health outcomes for people with, or at risk

of developing, diabetes

  Improved self-management for clients with

diabetes

  Better access for clients to diabetes nurse

educators, dietitians and podiatrists

Strategic Direction 2: Increasing the State s Capacity to Promote of Quality of Life2



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 24

Strategic Direction 2: Increasing the State s Capacity to Promote of Quality of Life2   Better programs to target at-risk groups
  Increased opportunities for education/updates

for clients, GPs, nursing and allied health

  Improved continuity of care.

Aboriginal health workers have been trained to

implement vision impairment prevention programs

associated with diabetes. There has also been

improved consumer input in planning and improved

access to information for consumers.

Renal services

Additional funding has been provided to respond to

key priorities identified in the Review of Country

Renal services. Funding is made up of $200 000 to

the Port Augusta Hospital to enable 5-7 additional

patients to access renal dialysis and $150 000 to Mt

Gambier and Pt Lincoln to establish support facilities

for patients choosing to self manage their own renal

dialysis.

Early childhood intervention for rural
and regional areas

Funding in 2000-2001 was $330 500 and increased

to $450 000 for 2001-2002. The program is designed

to increase access to a range of allied health services

for children with development delays and their

families living in regional SA. Benefits will include

increased provision of speech pathology, occupational

therapy, physiotherapy, developmental assessment

and behaviour therapy.

Mental Health

An active Mental Health Promotion program has

been undertaken in 2000-2001, including

contributing to the National Action Plan for

Promotion, Prevention and Early Intervention for

Mental Health, 2000 and developing the Mental

Health Promotion Workforce Development Project in

the Mid North Region of country SA. Major priorities

include suicide prevention, early childhood issues,

depression and services to young people. Regional

Mental Health funding has increased from a little

over $1.5 million in 1998-99 to almost $4 million in

2000-2001.

Rural GPs

Recruiting and retaining medical staff in country areas

remains a significant issue and an important priority.

The State provided $948 100 to the SA Rural &amp;

Remote Medical Support Agency (SARRMSA) to

coordinate activities and strategies to assist in the

recruitment and retention of doctors in rural SA in

2000-2001.

The State and Commonwealth Governments have an

ongoing commitment to increasing the numbers of

doctors practising in country areas. There are

currently 26 vacancies for GPs in rural South

Australia.

Strategies are in place within medical schools and in

rural areas to address the issue, including providing

Rural Education Scholarships. These require

successful applicants to live and work in a rural area

of South Australia for a period equivalent to the

scholarship funding. Health is one of a number of

disciplines in which these scholarships are now

offered.

A further incentive is provided through the Rural

Health Enhancement Package, which provides

significant financial reward to resident country

practitioners at a current annual cost of $7 million.

RHEP offers doctors enhanced hospital Fee-For-

Service payments in return for their commitment to a

series of  best practice  initiatives. 300 individual GPs,

over 30 individual resident Specialists, and more than

60 hospitals are involved in one or more components

of the package.

The State Government has funded a project to recruit

overseas-trained doctors (OTDs), providing $130 000

this year and the same amount next year. 32

overseas-trained doctors have been recruited into

South Australia during this financial year. This is well

in excess of the target of 12-15 set at the beginning of

the year. 63 doctors have been recruited from

overseas through this scheme, which remains a short-

term recruitment strategy as many OTDs move

elsewhere or return to their home country. In April

2001 there were 24 OTDs working in rural SA with

another 21 OTDs in various stages of the recruitment

process.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 25

DHS and the Commonwealth Department of Health

and Aged Care (DHAC) are working together

regarding the Medical Outreach Specialist Program

which includes a visiting psychiatrist program for

country areas as a first priority. An initial review has

identified other possible specialties which include (but

are not limited to) paediatrics, palliative care and

dermatology.

Domestic violence

DHS has a responsibility for providing services to

people affected by violence, including child abuse,

domestic violence, rape and sexual assault. A policy is

being developed to promote violence prevention.

Training courses, which will meet pending national

standards, have already commenced in metropolitan

and country areas. Training for working with men will

reflect the five-year plan to stop violent behaviours

endorsed by the Ministerial Forum for the Prevention

of Domestic Violence.

The Metropolitan Division of DHS funds the four

metropolitan community health services to provide a

primary service delivery role to the community. It

works in partnership with other DHS divisions and

key partner agencies to develop innovative responses

to addressing violence with emphasis on early

intervention.

The Violence Intervention Programs based at

Elizabeth and central Adelaide have been favourably

reviewed during the year and, as a result, have

received funding for a further four years.

Bramwell House Motel Alternative Service was

opened in March 2001, providing supported crisis

accommodation for women and children escaping

domestic violence.

The 1800 domestic violence telephone
response service

A model for this service was developed following

collaboration between Adelaide Central Mission   DV

Helpline; Domestic Violence Crisis Service Inc

(DVCS); and Crisis Response And Child Abuse Service

(CRACAS). It is anticipated that it will be fully

operational by November 2001.

Key features will include:

  One call, to one number 24 hours/day and

7 days/week

  Streamlined entry point

  Coordination of telephone responses across all

3 services

  Improved collaboration between services

  Increased provision of a 24 hour/day risk

assessment response

  Improved access for country callers

  Development of a procedure and information

manual specific to country callers

  Improved access for persons using a teleprinter

for people with a deafness disability

  Improved monitoring and recording of quantity

and quality of demand

  Improved promotional opportunities

  Linking of the roles of professional and volunteer

workers in the sector.

Urban regeneration

The urban regeneration program recognises the need

for projects to be tailored for different communities.

Three key areas were addressed during 2000: inter-

agency collaboration, projects focused on public

housing and community capacity building.

An Interagency Projects Team was formally

established in July 2000, comprising representatives

of DHS; the Department of Education, Training and

Employment; and the Department of Transport, and

Urban Planning and the Arts. The team has identified

seven key strategic directions and work is proceeding

on a number of potential demonstration projects.

Urban regeneration projects with a specific focus on

public housing are underway at The Parks and

Salisbury North while other urban renewal projects

are occurring at Windsor Green, Lincoln Gardens,

Risdon Grove and Mitchell Park.

Strategic Direction 2: Increasing the State s Capacity to Promote of Quality of Life2



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 26

Strategic Direction 2: Increasing the State s Capacity to Promote of Quality of Life2 Two examples of community capacity building projects
are the Playford Partnership, formally established late

in 1999; and the Blair Athol/Kilburn project that

commenced in January 2001. These projects

recognise that housing and physical redevelopment

are just part of the fabric of community and therefore

include education, employment, health, welfare,

safety, and recreation as equally relevant elements of

social capital.

Health promotion

DHS has undertaken extensive and targeted

sponsorship and marketing throughout the year.

Programs have included nutrition and Smart Choice in

partnership with the SANFL, SA BMX Association and

the State Library of SA; SunSmart with the Jacobs Creek

Tour Down Under, WOMAD and Tennis SA; and Smart

Choice with Carols by Candlelight, SAJC and SACA.

Health Promoting Schools grants were awarded to 14

schools to promote better health around issues such as

physical activity, self esteem, conflict resolution and

nutrition and the Minister for Human Services

launched a resource kit for schools entitled  Health

Promoting Schools - Supportive Environments for

Learning and Health .

A training course in  physical activity and health  for

researchers and practitioners was attended by

representatives from SA, interstate and overseas.

Funding was provided for the  Health In Prisons 

project, aimed at increasing levels of physical activity

amongst inmates. A project officer has been appointed

and planning is underway to provide greater

opportunities to improve health and wellbeing for

prisoners at Yatala.

DHS worked collaboratively with the Metropolitan

Domiciliary Care Services in the development of an

early intervention falls prevention service and 380

service providers attended a one day forum

presenting research on preventing falls and falls injury

in older people.

A collaborative initiative between DHS and the

Flinders University Coordinated Care Training Unit

funded a Mental Health Promotion project working

with people with depression, a project for people with

chronic respiratory conditions and an Aboriginal

Health project working with rural and remote

communities in the Eyre Region.

Human services to prisoners and
offenders

The department has developed a coordinated

response to the human service needs of prisoners and

offenders and is planning initiatives/activities within

correctional facilities. Work is continuing with the

Department of Correctional Services to establish a

Memorandum of Understanding for delivery of

health care services in correctional settings.

Palliative care strategy

The Strategic Plan for Palliative Care Services 1998 

2006 guides the planning and development of

palliative care services in SA. This plan has driven

palliative care development and continues to set the

direction for improving our palliative care services.

Priorities to 2001 have largely been met and work is

being undertaken on the directions needed to achieve

the priorities for 2001 2006. Last financial year

palliative care services were provided to 2966

patients during the end stages of life and supported

their families through this bereavement period.

The Executive Services Unit of DHS provided advice

and information to service providers and the

community on the Consent to Medical Treatment and

Palliative Care Act 1995 (the Consent Act). This

included advice on issues relating to the advance health

care directives options available in SA (e.g. medical

power of attorney and enduring power of

guardianship). Trained staff delivered education

sessions and dealt with approximately 500 enquiries

(around 42 calls per month) from callers requesting

forms and specific information about advance health

care directives and related consent issues.

About 54% of calls were from the general community

and 46% were service providers   approximately 10%

of calls were from country areas. DHS has developed

an effective working relationship with the Office of the

Public Advocate and Palliative Care Council to ensure

that the delivery of community education about

advance health care directives is consistent and of a

high standard.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 27

Strategic Direction 2: Increasing the State s Capacity to Promote of Quality of Life2



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 28

Strategic Direction 2: Increasing the State s Capacity to Promote of Quality of Life2 Tobacco
In recent years, since peaking in 1996 at 28.4%, age

standardized smoking prevalence rates have been

trending down to the current low of 25% (for the

year 2000).

Under the auspices of the Tobacco Products Regulation

Act, officers undertook 55 investigations into the

alleged illegal sale of tobacco products to minors, 152

investigations regarding complaints of smoking where

meals were being served, 341 inspections and

assessment for exemption under the provisions of

Section 47 (smoking in enclosed public dining and

caf  areas) and 337 inspections for compliance with

the provisions of Section 47.

The Smoke-free Homes and Cars Project featured a

strong media campaign run from October - December

2000 and again from May - July 2001. The project

aims to reduce the damage to children s health from

passive smoking; reduce smoking in homes and cars,

particularly where there are children aged under five

present and encourage public support for non-

smoking areas in general. Interim results have been

encouraging and a final report on the project s

achievements is expected in January 2002.

The BREATHE Easy! Campaign, in collaboration with

Quit SA and Chemplus, included radio and print

advertising and aimed to increase the number of

smoke-free workplaces, particularly those with less

than 50 employees. Run from August - September

2000, this project was highly

successful in engaging many

more workplaces than expected

and, as a result, follow up

support to large and small

workplaces has extended well

into 2001.

BreastScreen SA

A record number of women is being

screened for breast cancer in South

Australia and the free BreastScreen

SA service is acknowledged as the

 gold standard  in Australia.

In the 2000-2001 financial year,

BreastScreen SA performed

67 737 screening mammograms.

From January 1989 to

December 2000 the program detected 2826 breast

cancers, a significant proportion of which were early

stage cancers, with a good prognosis for simpler

treatment and cure.

To December 2000, 64.7% of women in the target

group (50 to 69 years) participated in the program

over a 24-month period (the recommended screening

interval). The national target is 70%.

Figures from the South Australian Cancer Registry

Report (2000) showed that in 1997-99 there was a

20% reduction in deaths from breast cancer in South

Australian women in the target group (50 to 69 years

of age) compared to the preceding 10-year period.

Education, early detection through breast cancer

screening and improvements in treatment of breast

cancer contributed to this achievement.

SA Cervix Screening Program

The SA Cervix Screening program has significantly

reduced the incidence and deaths from cervical

cancer in SA women.

The Program is working towards a 70% participation

in regular 2-year screening by all women in the target

population of women aged 18-70. Particular efforts

have been made to increase participation in under-

screened groups including older women. This has

resulted in an increase in screening rates over the

1999-2000 period.

Screening among younger age

groups has fallen slightly,

indicating a need to maintain

recruitment efforts for women

of all ages.

Organ donation

South Australia has a higher

proportion of organ donors

than any other state and this has

resulted in higher rates of

kidney transplantation.

National Organ Donor

Awareness Week in February

2001 focused on the need for

members of the community to

register their donor intention

on the Australian Organ

Donation Register. The  Gift of



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 29

Life  garden was officially opened by the Governor

and the Minister for Human Services during that

Week. The garden was established as an expression of

gratitude and to pay tribute to the many organ

donors and their families for making a new life

possible.

Environmental Health Service

DHS has employed an Indigenous environmental

health officer to advance community-based

Indigenous environmental health worker

employment, education and training opportunities

throughout the State. Extensive support has been

given to the Yalata Aboriginal community in bringing

about a safer and healthier living environment with

regard to drinking water quality, housing and waste

management. Six remote Indigenous communities

have been assisted to monitor the microbiological

quality of their drinking water.

Quality use of medicines

The Quality Use of Medicine (QUM) Program

conducted an implementation study in the Southern

Fleurieu Peninsula region of the State to increase the

use of non-drug options in the management of

insomnia while reducing the prescribing of the

benzodiazepine class of drugs for this condition. A

reduction in prescribing of 20.5% was achieved,

without inappropriate substitution of other drugs

such as antidepressants.

Food Bill and safety standards

A Food Bill has been passed by Parliament, based on a

national model which aims to promote uniformity of

food laws throughout Australia and New Zealand.

New national Food Safety Standards will be adopted

under the legislation. These Standards are expected

to be phased in during 2002. DHS will administer a

special $1.8 million budget allocation over the next

two years to support an implementation plan

including strategies for consultation and

communication with industry and local government.

Regulation of Genetically Modified
Organisms (GMOs)

Three significant national initiatives - the

Commonwealth Gene Technology Act 2000; the

national Gene Technology Regulator and the co-

operative national regulatory scheme for GMOs,

all commenced on 21 June 2001. The new

national scheme is designed to protect public

health and the environment. The SA Government

responsibility for regulation of GMOs transferred

to the Minister for Human Services in May 2001.

Water for human consumption

DHS has played a key role in developing the

Framework for Drinking Water Quality

Management for inclusion in the National Health

and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)

Australian Drinking Water Guidelines and was a

focus of discussions with World Health

Organisation (WHO) representatives at a meeting

in Adelaide in May 2001.

Waste control systems and waste
water

Approval was granted to the Mt Barker Septic Tank

Effluent Drainage Scheme reclaimed water reuse

system for irrigation of a golf course and crops. A

five-year approval has been issued for the supply

of reclaimed water through the Virginia Pipeline

Scheme, following satisfactory performance during

the Bolivar tertiary treatment plant s first year of

operation.

Radiation protection legislation

DHS made a significant contribution to the

ongoing review of national radiation protection

legislation. The SA Ionizing Radiation Regulations,

under the Radiation Protection and Control Act,

came into force in September 2000. The new

regulations adopted the current NHMRC

recommendations for limiting exposures to

ionizing radiation for both radiation workers and

members of the public. The new dose limits are

more restrictive than those they replace.

Strategic Direction 2: Increasing the State s Capacity to Promote of Quality of Life2



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 30

Strategic Direction 2: Increasing the State s Capacity to Promote of Quality of Life2 Disability Action Plans
Promoting Independence   Disability Action Plans for

SA was launched by the Minister for Disability Services

in November 2000. It provides a framework for

developing Disability Action Plans to assist all

portfolios and agencies to meet the requirements of

the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992

(DDA) and the SA Equal Opportunity Act 1984.

DHS has established an Implementation Reference

Group to co-ordinate its implementation across

portfolios. Progress will be reported to the Minister

for Disability Services by each portfolio each year and

included in their Annual Reports.

DHS s report is as follows:

Outcome 1:

Portfolios and their agencies ensure accessibility to their

services to people with disabilities.

The key strategy to achieve this outcome within DHS is

the development of the draft Disability Action Plan.

This sets directions for human service providers to

redesign policies, programs and facilities to ensure that

mainstream services are accessible for people with

disabilities; eliminate practices that are discrimin-atory;

and increase employment opportunities for people

with disabilities. There is a strong emphasis on

addressing physical, communication and attitudinal

barriers in these key areas.

Outcome 2:

Portfolios and their agencies ensure information about

their services and programs is inclusive of people with

disabilities.

DHS s Country and Disability Services Division is

collaborating with the Information Economy Policy

Office (IEPO) to research the need to provide on-line

and technology-based services for people with

disabilities in regional South Australia. The project

aims to identify:

  existing on-line services available to people with

disabilities

  services available to the wider disabled community but

not available to people with disabilities living in

regional, rural and remote areas

  opportunities for service delivery to people with

disabilities using technology - particularly the

Internet - and the benefits that may be realised

  barriers or impediments to using on-line services

or technology for people living with disabilities

  training and technical support issues

  potential partner programs/services/agencies in

on-line service delivery to people with disabilities

in regional South Australia.

On completing this research, a business case will be

developed for the project.

Outcome 3:

Portfolios and their agencies deliver advice or services to

people with disabilities with awareness and

understanding of issues affecting people with disabilities

One of the priorities of the Plan is to ensure that

there is awareness and understanding by staff and

volunteers of their obligations under the DDA as well

as the needs of people with disabilities. One of the key

strategies to achieve this outcome will be developing a

training and resource framework for staff and

volunteers in targeted areas of responsibility.

Outcome 4:

Portfolios and their agencies provide opportunities for

consultation with people with disabilities in decision

making processes regarding service delivery and in the

implementation of complaints and grievance

mechanisms

Appropriate access for people with disabilities to

complaint handling procedures within services as well

as access to independent complaint authorities is

provided for within the Plan.

Development of the Equity of Access to Health

Services for People with Disabilities: Policy Statement

and Strategic Directions policy involved extensive

community consultation. This involved preparing a

discussion paper inviting written responses;

metropolitan and country consultations; and finally,

wide distribution of a draft policy statement and

strategic directions document for final comment.

Outcome 5:

Each portfolio Chief Executive will ensure that their

portfolio has met the requirements of the Disability

Discrimination Act 1992 and the Equal Opportunity

Act 1984.

The Plan requires service providers to develop their

own action plans through service agreements with

formal procedures for reporting and implementation.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 31

Redistributing Resources
       in a Changing Environment

3 Strategic Direction
DHS ensures that people in greatest need receive

priority support and access to services in

health, housing and community service.

An evidence based Collaborative Networked Services

framework will guide the implementation of Clinical

Services Reviews and will result in coordinated

networks of clinical services provided across

metropolitan and country regions. There is a strong

emphasis on providing effective, integrated linkages

of clinical services across a range of sites and settings

to ensure a comprehensive and appropriate response

to health needs of individuals and communities. The

framework will provide an overall planned approach

linking outcomes to decisions about evidence-based

clinical planning, capital and infrastructure

development, clinical workforce planning, teaching

and research. Reference Groups have been

established for Healthy Start, Renal and Urology

Services and Emergency and Trauma Services.

An internal review of Domiciliary Care Services in

metropolitan and country areas has been completed.

It looked at:

  current demand/need pressures;

  eligibility criteria, assessment models and

governance;

  management and accountability processes; and

  links between domiciliary care services and other

agencies.

A review of Rehabilitation Services was undertaken to

determine the rehabilitation needs of the state,

whether existing services are adequate, how they

should be structured and the range of services that

should be provided. Consultation has occurred with

rehabilitation services provided by public and private

service providers and with aged care and disability

services as well as Commonwealth and State planners.

A review of Disability Services has led to the

development of the Disability Services Planning

Framework 2000-2003. It sets directions for the

provision of disability services in SA until December

2003 and will provide the basis for detailed business

planning, while ensuring planning and funding of

disability services are aligned with corporate priorities.

An accommodation services sub committee considered

how the movement from large institutions to

community based living can be further progressed.

Operational reviews of country hospitals have been

completed at Mount Gambier, Pt Pirie, Whyalla and

Pt Augusta. The outcomes are better use of resources

and improved services, with a better understanding of

the cost drivers and operational and structural

inefficiencies in the hospitals.

The Healthy Start framework moves the approach

from  having a baby  to  creating a family . Healthy

Start includes the Implementation Plan for Obstetric,

Neonatal and Gynaecology Services in SA, which

recognises that between 2001-06 SA s birth rate will

fall by around 10%.

A Youth Services framework is being developed to

ensure better coordination and delivery of services.

The focus is on strengthening local, regional and

statewide relationships and links between government

and non-government service providers.

FAYS is reviewing the way its accommodation and

residential services are delivered. The juvenile justice

services offered by FAYS are also under review. FAYS is

identifying the strengths and weaknesses in the

current system and ways to improve service delivery.

Exceptional Needs program

People considered to be in an exceptional need

category usually have three or more debilitating

conditions spanning mental illness, intellectual and/or

sensory/physical disability, homelessness, drug and

alcohol abuse and acquired brain injury. They

experience exceptional circumstances manifesting in

them being of high risk to self and/or others. They

repeatedly fall through service gaps or their needs

cannot be met within the existing structures. Some may

come to the notice of DHS from interstate, through

Ministers or the Ombudsman, or via emergency

services or other Departments such as Justice.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 32

Strategic Direction 3: Redistributing Resources in a Changing Environment

The exceptional needs mechanism addresses equity

and access for these individuals or families, adopts a

crisis prevention focus, provides better service

outcomes for those most in need and facilitates

systemic and policy change towards improved service

integration to reduce gaps.

The annual cost of $2 million will enable appropriate

brokerage funding (e.g. for specialist/supported

accommodation; key worker; and specific

interventions not available within the public sector)

for 50 people. It is anticipated that cost efficiency will

be facilitated within two years through operational

and evaluation processes geared toward service sector

self-reliance in dealing with people in exceptional

need. The mechanism is crucial to ensuring that

government services are able to cope now and in the

future with escalating numbers of exceptional need,

at risk clients.

Improved outcomes for young people

DHS s mandate to create a continuum of

development opportunities for young people across

the service system was realised in northern

metropolitan Adelaide through establishing and

coordinating a range of lifestyle support services for

young people living in that region. With strong

community support, new partnerships have been

established and funding obtained for services available

from the Salisbury High School s alternative

education site at Paralowie House to be expanded.

Public tenders have been called. The overall goal is to

acknowledge and build on the strengths, spirit and

resilience of young people living in the northern

metropolitan area of Adelaide through providing an

extended range of alternative education, enterprise,

employment, accommodation and lifestyle support

opportunities.

North West Children and Families
Integration Project

The north western children and families integration

project has brought together three programs (the

Parenting Network, Kids n You and Tier 3) into a

framework with an emphasis on a coordinated and

sustainable response to strengthening families. The

focus has been upon developing aspects of integration

that will lead to service enhancement. This is Stage

One of a broader approach to developing integrated

regional services. Stage Two will involve linking with a

number of broader system developments. Based in the

north, the purpose is to develop approaches and

processes for integrated services that can be applied to

other regions.

DHS has allocated additional funding to this initiative

and will develop future directions with a steering

group composed of the key service providers for

children and families. The anticipated outcomes of

the work are:

  Families can move between the services with

minimum disruption

  Assessment processes provide information for

accurate and appropriate early intervention for

families with high needs

  Increased capacity to look at innovative

approaches to fund holding

  Increased ability to apply for further funding and

have the infrastructure to manage it

  Simplified, more accessible information systems

for users and staff

  Development of regional integrated planning for

children and families.

Mental Health initiatives

  An Emergency Mental Health Services team was

established at Noarlunga

  Preliminary work commenced on the development

of a Resource Allocation Model for Mental Health

  An additional $4.5 million was allocated by DHS

in the past three years for Mental Health reforms

  Additional funding was allocated, and new

models are being developed, for providing

Mental Health services for country people.

3



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 33

Strengthening a Culture
      of Working Together

4 Strategic Direction
DHS is committed to the creation of a tolerant,

fair and safe staff environment that supports

diversity and respects others  views, skills,
experience, knowledge, encourages debate and

values difference of opinion.

Services to the Aboriginal Community

A Marketing Campaign to promote DHS as a
potential employer to the Aboriginal community was

launched in January 2001. Six Aboriginal Graduates
have been recruited throughout DHS Central Office,

six Aboriginal trainees were recruited to DHS and the
Indigenous Medical Scholarship Program has been

expanded to include Nursing &amp; Allied Health
professionals.

The seven Aboriginal Health Advisory Committees
(AHACs) in the country regions of SA provide

support and advice to the one Ministerial-appointed
Aboriginal representative on the Regional Board.

Each of the AHACs is at different stages of

development and is creating a partnership approach
at a local and regional level. They are composed of a

majority of Aboriginal community members to
encourage the involvement of Aboriginal people in

addressing their health needs and issues. The SA
Aboriginal Health Partnership is supporting the work

of AHACs by producing its own newspaper,
highlighting the involvement of Aboriginal

communities in the planning and delivery of relevant
health and wellbeing services.

In Ceduna, the Aboriginal Services Division (ASD)
has facilitated consultations about relocating Anangu

residents in Kuhlmann Street to the newly acquired
 town camp , which has been renamed  Elders Camp 

to respect the status of the elders in the community.
Managers have been employed to develop programs

with current residents and assist with transition to the
new site. Management issues relating to the provision

of  wet  and  dry  areas are being worked through
and a planning officer has been employed by local

government for three months to facilitate this
process in consultation with the ASD community

development officer.

At Coober Pedy, a Community Strategy has been

developed to address alcohol/substance misuse and
associated problems. This has included funding a

Mobile Assistance Patrol to move drinkers to a place
of safety. Food and nutrition programs have been

funded at the Coober Pedy Hospital (breakfast) and
at the Iwara Kutju Community Development

Employment Program (CDEP) (lunch).

Integrated services for older people

Implementation of Moving Ahead - The Next Step

2000-2001 Action Plan, which is strongly linked with

the Primary Care &amp; Community Support

Framework, provided the key framework for

continued development of a more integrated service

system for older people. In northern metropolitan

Adelaide a broad coalition of interests continued

active support of collaborative processes, particularly

through Northern Venture, Supportlink and the

Northern Collaborative Project.

CommunityLink Centres

DHS is developing CommunityLink Centres, bringing

together health, housing and community services. The

Centres will provide the opportunity to link

Neighbourhood Houses and Centres, hospitals, local

businesses and services provided by GPs and the non-

government sector. Four proposed regional hubs are

under consideration at Noarlunga, Elizabeth and

Marion, with CommunityLink Centre developments

at the Parks Community Centre complex already well

under way, demonstrating a linking approach using IT

networks.

Northern Children and Families Forum

Creation of this Forum followed discussion with

service providers about the needs of the northern

area and a workshop organised by DHS in March

2001. The Forum is an interagency group focused on

collaborative action. The initial work of the forum is

looking at a regional approach to services and

programs that support parenting.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 34

4 Integration of services in the southernmetropolitan region
Managers from 15 DHS agencies in the Southern

metropolitan area met throughout the year to

coordinate service delivery and plan to integrate

services across health, housing and community

support sectors. Projects have been identified in

relation to mental health, protocols to improve multi

agency linkages in the region and the development of

integrated human services as part of the proposed

redevelopment of the Noarlunga Centre by the

private sector.

Suicide

The Suicide Prevention Task Force has carried out an

internal review of its role and function as the

Ministerial advisory body on Suicide. Following this

Review it has been agreed that the Task Force is to

continue and that it will be enhanced to take on a

more whole-of-government approach to suicide

prevention.

Financial Services

Wirreanda High School students worked with staff

from the Financial Services Division to depict the

Financial Services Business Plan 2000-2001 in a

multimedia format. The Wirreanda students,

supported by Hamilton Secondary College students

who filmed video sequences, used the latest

technology to combine text, still and moving pictures,

sound and voice-overs, animation and live action

video on to a small custom-shaped CD-ROM.

Contracting   partnerships with NGOs

DHS provides in excess of $145 million per annum to

Non-Government Organisations - most of which work

in areas of families, youth, ageing and disability. A

joint project between the SA Council of Social Service

(SACOSS) and DHS has been initiated to review the

experience of contracting and to develop an agenda

for continued improvement.

 Working Together  is a document that developed

from the joint DHS/SACOSS project. It provides a

framework for building relationships between DHS

and non-government community service providers. A

joint DHS/SACOSS group will oversee the

implementation of changes supported by the Working

Together report, these include proposed changes to

current practice in areas such as contracting and

performance management.

Improving access and equity  
cultural &amp; linguistic diversity

Statewide consultations conducted with ethnic

communities, key leaders and service providers

identified six key Strategic Directions:

  Promote wellbeing and health

  Develop and build culturally appropriate human

services

  Improve equity of resource allocation

  Provide equitable access to information

  Promote partnerships and build the capacity of

ethnic communities

  Improve management for quality performance.

A multicultural website is currently under

development and is expected to be on-line by the end

of 2001. This website will improve client access to a

range of information in English and in community

languages.

DHS has provided funding to the University of South

Australia s School of Social Work and Social Policy

over three years to undertake a project to improve

knowledge, skills and practice on cultural diversity in

the human services and related industries and higher

education sector. The department is also funding an

initiative to develop and establish benchmarks for

cultural competencies in service delivery in order to

promote service excellence for people from culturally

and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Strategic Direction 4: Strengthening a Culture of Working Together



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 35

Strengthening a Culture of Working Together4



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 36

Providing Sound Management5 Strategic Direction
DHS recognises that sound management of

resources is fundamental to supporting the

delivery of quality services.

Managing demand for services

DHS is committed to improved management of

demand for services. Actions taken in 2000-2001 in

support of this commitment include:

  The development and implementation of a

winter bed strategy involving a continued

coordinated and collaborative approach to bed

management across the metropolitan system

  Planning for the establishment of Emergency

Extended Care Unit beds in major metropolitan

hospitals

  Funding an additional 85 beds in the 2000-2001

period including 20 at The Queen Elizabeth

Hospital (TQEH) for nursing home type patients

awaiting placement in aged care facilities

  Development and implementation of an

Ambulance Diversion Policy

  Expansion of Hospital in the Home programs

providing acute, sub-acute and post acute care

which would otherwise be provided as inpatient

service

  Support and enhancement of hospital avoidance

programs, short-term, health crisis intervention

programs aimed at avoiding unnecessary

admission to hospital of older people

  Improved relationships with other service

providers

  Flexibility in service response

  Staff flu vaccination program.

Professional services   nursing

DHS provides leadership to the nursing profession

through developing policies and project/research

initiatives that improve nursing services. Advice on

professional, management and industrial issues is

provided to government and industry.

Implementation of Phase 2 of the Nurse Practitioner

role continues. Nurse Practitioners have much to

offer to the community - in particular adding value or

developing areas where no health care services exist.

The department continues to work closely with key

constituents, including the Nurses Board of South

Australia, who are carefully considering the

regulatory issues associated with introducing Nurse

Practitioner practice. Consultation continues to

develop guidelines for individual nurses to apply for

an exemption to the Ionising Radiation Regulations in

order for them to be able to initiate diagnostic

imaging tests within their scope of practice.

To maintain a viable nursing workforce in

metropolitan and rural and remote areas recruitment

and retention strategies are being implemented:

  The nurse marketing campaign to promote

nursing as a professional career option to

teenagers has been launched and consists of

metrolites, radio commercials, a website,

advertising in street press, newspapers, Parent

Say magazine and the SATAC Guide, as well as a

video, brochures and showbags which were sent

to all secondary schools in the State.

  Support was provided to the Royal College of

Nursing Australia s inaugural Nursing Career,

Employment and Education Expo.

  Fully funded clinical refresher and re-entry

programs for registered nurses have commenced.

  Resources have been provided for further

recruitment and retention strategies which will

include but not be limited to, additional refresher

and re-entry programs including those for

Enrolled Nurses, extension of the marketing

campaign and support for continuing education.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 37

  200 additional nurses have been provided for

acute care metropolitan and rural and remote

health units.

  Support was provided for the inaugural SA

Nursing Excellence Awards 2001 program. The

Awards are to recognise nurses for their

professional commitment and encourage

excellence in nursing. Awards were presented for

Nursing Leadership, Clinical Practice (four

categories: - including Community, Metropolitan

Acute Care, Rural and Remote Care, and

Residential and Extended Care), Education and

Research with awards to recognise specifically

both an Enrolled Nurse and an Aboriginal Nurse..

Information and Communications

There have been significant improvements in

information management and communications

facilities across the Human Services Portfolio.

Hospitals now have improved data networks and

common software to support business activities. Work

commenced on projects to replace the hospitals 

ageing patient management and financial systems.

Country and metropolitan non-acute health services

have progressively been provided with access to CME

(Client Management Engine), the department s client

information system. At the end of the year CME had

been deployed in 34 agencies across 64 locations.

The Department of Human Services has been the first

agency to establish a formal Knowledge Management

function with resources dedicated to providing

services to enable better decision making through the

creation, sharing and leveraging of the value of

knowledge and facilitating best practice across the

organisation. During the year the department

adopted a Knowledge Management Framework and

commenced the development of a web-enabled

knowledge base to be available to clients through

Government web sites, CD-ROM and hard copy. The

department s knowledge management initiatives were

recognised with national productivity and innovation

awards.

Performance management

Performance Information Frameworks have been

developed for three high order plans:

  Moving Ahead   Strategic Plan for Older Persons

  Mental Health Implementation Plan

  Aboriginal Services  Journey Paper  and Strategic

Plan (Reconciliation).

Reporting on Moving Ahead and Mental Health has

commenced on a six monthly basis.

The Portfolio Statement is used to report on Output

Classes to the Department of Treasury and Finance.

The current structure of Output Classes has been in

place for three years. Although a review of the

outputs is about to be conducted, it is timely to

examine the trends for selected performance

measures. The period 1999-2000 to 2000-2001 has

been analysed for the indicators below:

  From 1999-2000 to 2000-2001 there has been

an increased participation rate in breast screens

among 50-69 year olds of 3.2%. It is important to

note that Aboriginal women in the 50-69 year

age group have increased their participation rate

by 10.6%.

  Between 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 occupied

bed days for all nursing home type patients rose

by a further 3.8%.

  The number of weighted separations for

metropolitan hospitals increased by 3.4%

between 1999-2000 and 2000-2001. The

number of weighted separations for country

hospitals decreased only 0.1% for the same

period.

  The number of weighted outpatient occasions of

service for metropolitan hospitals dropped by

2.7% between 1998-99 and 1999-2000.

However, between 1999-2000 and 2000-2001

there was an increase of 9.1%.

  Between 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 there was a

decrease in country hospital outpatient services

of 10.0%.

Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management5



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 38

1 Includes SAHT, SA Community Housing Authority

(SACHA) and the AHA.

Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management5   Between 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 the
emergency weighted occasions of service at

metropolitan hospitals increased by 20.7%.

Country hospital figures increased by 15.1%.

  The number of community care packages for

people over the age of 60 years increased by 712

between 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 thereby

decreasing the demand for alternative

accommodation placement particularly in nursing

homes and acute care beds.

  Between 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 there was a

significant increase of 38.7% in the number of

complaints of substandard private rental housing.

  The number of accommodation places provided

for homeless people or those at risk of

homelessness through the Supported Tenancies

Scheme rose between 1999-2000 and 2000-

2001 by 9.5%.

  In public and community housing1 , 1300 homes

were upgraded at a cost of $37.225 million.

The department is committed to the ongoing

development and enhancement of the performance

information and management reporting systems that

will provide senior portfolio managers with sound,

timely and comprehensive information to enable

them to make informed decisions.

Family and Youth Services (FAYS)

South Australia will have a Social Welfare Services

Planning Framework by the end of the year. The

framework will centre on the services provided for

youth and families through the department, as well as

services and funding provided across the non-

government sector that services this client group. It

will establish key directions for DHS in supporting the

needs of children, young people and their families

over the next three years.

It will incorporate the work of the anti-poverty

program, along with services for young people and

children under the Guardianship of the Minister for

Human Services, adolescents at risk and juvenile

justice, child protection, alternative care and adoption

services.

A Review of Alternative Care is underway, which

will provide specific recommendations on the

alternative care system for the future and describe

how the department, in partnership with the

services sector, may enhance the provision of

services to meet the needs of children, young

people and their families.

Country health aged care and capital
works

In 2001-2002, $18.842 million is budgeted for a

major program of capital works in 15 country

hospitals. Three projects were for hospital

developments; one was for an upgrade of a

hospital building with the other 11 projects for

improved aged care accommodation. In 2000-

2001 the value of the program was $6.287 million.

Country facilities will be upgraded through a

capital investment program to improve services to

rural residents. Over three years this totals

$14.799 million for major health projects. In

addition, $2.494 million has been committed for

capital projects for Aboriginal specific services.

Performance Indicators for
Community Health

The Performance Indicators for Community

Health Project is a collaboration between

community health and DHS to develop meaningful

performance indicators (PIs) for the community

health sector. Indicators being developed will be

robust enough to measure performance yet

sensitive to the complexity of the wide range of

 community health .

General Practitioner/Emergency
Department (GP/ED) after-hours
co-location trials

The department has initiated winter trials of after-

hours co-location of GPs with metropolitan

hospital emergency departments. The first 12-week

trial, located at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital,

began in July 2001 following careful planning in

2000-2001. Trials are proposed for the Women s

and Children s Hospital and the Blackwood private

hospital. Initial feedback from the patients, GPs

and ED staff at TQEH has been extremely positive.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 39

The trials have been planned to test ways of improving

access to primary care after-hours care for patients

with  GP type  medical complaints. Early results show

waiting times for these patients has been reduced.

Trust Fund for young people under
the Guardianship of the Minister for
Human Services

There is unequivocal evidence that children and

young people under the Guardianship of the Minister

(GoM) are highly disadvantaged, with a high need for

specialist services. $1.5 million has been allocated for

the establishment of a fund for children under the

Minister s Guardianship to foster their talents and

assist them with educational and employment

opportunities. The Dame Roma Mitchell Trust Fund

for Children and Young People is currently being

established.

Office for the Ageing

The following activities associated with the Home and

Community Care Program (HACC) Program

occurred during 2000-2001:

  Successfully managed allocation of a record $81.5

million in HACC funding for services across SA

  Negotiated a Deed of Agreement with the

Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) regarding

the Veterans Home Care Program, which will

provide an additional $660 000 per year for

HACC services in SA

  Conducted the inaugural State HACC

Indigenous Worker s Forum

  Selected ten HACC funded agencies for appraisal

in 2001, which are in the process of completing

their self-appraisal against the HACC Standards.

The following activities are associated with policy

portfolios and other areas of responsibility:

  A Seniors Register was established in January

2001.

  An Acute Transition Alliance was established to

provide care, rehabilitation and case planning in

an appropriate setting for older people exiting

hospitals.

  A diverse range of innovative projects was

funded through the Grants for Seniors

Program to extend the opportunities for older

people to gain access to a range of

recreational, educational and developmental

activities (approx. $340 000).

  The Aboriginal Aged Care Resource

Committee was established by the Council of

Aboriginal Elders of South Australia to provide

expert advice around ageing issues.

  Remissions on Emergency Services Levy and

concessions on council rates were introduced

for self funded-retirees and Seniors Card

holders.

  A new Ministerial Advisory Board was

appointed in September 2000, with the Hon

Jennifer Cashmore AM appointed as chair.

  The Tjilipi Pampa Ngura (Aged Care Facility)

located at Pukatja, previously known as

Ernabella, was opened ($2 757 750).

Mental Health

A new Director of Mental Health Services for SA,

Dr Margaret Tobin, was appointed on 31 July

2000.

During the past 12 months the Mental Health

Action Plan for Reform was completed and widely

disseminated. The Mental Health Unit has been

restructured and expanded to reflect strategic

directions and priorities and provide leadership

and support for the reform process. Mental Health

has been adopted as a key priority right across the

portfolio.

The Mental Health Communication Strategy is in

place and an Information Development Plan for

Mental Health in SA has been approved.

$1.7 million funding has been invested in IT

infrastructure for community based Mental Health

services in addition to $2.9 million provided over

three years by the Commonwealth to implement

the Commonwealth-State agreement for Mental

Health Information Development.

Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management5



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 40

Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management5 Asset Services
Asset Services ensures that adequate land, buildings

and equipment are available to service delivery

requirements.

Capital expenditure for 2000-2001 was $190.067

million including expenditure of $109.249 million on

Health and FAYS. The expenditure on housing

programs was $80.818 million excluding GST.

Major capital expenditure included:

  The $74 million Stages 2/3A of the RAH

redevelopment commenced with expenditure of

$4.168 million on early works and

documentation. Baulderstone Hornibrook was

appointed as construction manager for these

stages, which will upgrade critical care,

emergency, imaging, theatres and associated

clinical facilities over 4 years.

  The $37.4 million Stage 1 of the redevelopment

of The Queen Elizabeth Hospital commenced

with expenditure of $3.683 million. A further

$0.934 million was spent on building demolition.

This stage will provide 200 new inpatient beds to

replace existing wards.

  Stage A of the $87.4 million redevelopment of

Lyell McEwin Health Service commenced with

expenditure of $5.280 million on enabling works

and documentation. This stage will provide new

emergency, imaging, theatre, Intensive Care Unit

and High Dependency Unit wards, Women s

Health Centre and administration facilities.

  Upgrade and replacement of air conditioning at

Glenside Hospital was undertaken at a cost of

$1.552 million. Fire safety was also upgraded at

an additional cost of $217 000.

  There was ongoing construction of the $6.427

million Critical Care Unit at Flinders Medical

Centre with expenditure of $1.245 million in

2000-2001. This project replaces 15 old and 9

temporary beds with a new 24-bed facility.

  The $1.857 million Brain Injury Unit at

Hampstead Centre was completed with

expenditure of $1.604 million in 2000-2001.

This service was transferred from Julia Farr

Services.

  The $7.933 million Research building for the

IMVS was completed with expenditure of

$952 000 in 2000-2001.

  Stages 1 to 3 of the $8.6 million Modbury Public

Hospital redevelopment were completed with

expenditure of $3.255 million in 2000-2001.

Documentation of Stage 4 was completed and

went out to tender late in the year. A package of

associated works totalling $1.6 million was also

approved.

  The $6.550 million redevelopment of Noarlunga

Health Service including expansion of the

emergency services was progressed with

expenditure of $4.184 million in 2000-2001.

  The $1.4 million redevelopment of the 24-bed

psychiatric facility at RGH was completed with

expenditure of $1.179 million in 2000-2001.

  The construction of the new $14.7 million

rehabilitation facility at RGH was completed with

expenditure in 2000-2001 of $1.754 million.

A total of $2.850 million was spent on capital projects

for Family and Youth Services. Features of this

program included:

  Investment of $364 000 on Cavan Training

Centre

  $235 000 for the purchase of a property in

Ceduna for redevelopment as the District Office

  $954 000 to complete the fit-out of new District

Offices in Coober Pedy and Gawler

  $390 000 on maintenance works at Magill

Training Centre.

Projects for disability services included:

  equipment totalling $800 000 purchased

through the Independent Living Equipment

Program for people with intellectual disability

  $190 000 of a $250 000 program of urgent

maintenance at Strathmont Centre

  expenditure of $179 000 on the $4.850 million

Aged Care project at Northfield.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 41

The following country hospital projects were undertaken:

  Work was completed on the $2.665 million

redevelopment of day surgery, dental and

radiology at Mount Barker.

  The Port Broughton Health Centre was

upgraded at a cost of $378 000.

  The $1.017 redevelopment of aged care beds at

Jamestown was completed with expenditure of

$110 000.

  Engineering services at Whyalla Hospital were

upgraded at a cost of $697,000 with a further

$2.800 million to be spent over the next two years.

  The $2.146 million redevelopment of aged care

beds in Wakefield Region at Maitland, Riverton,

Snowtown and Eudunda was completed with

expenditure of $1.453 million in 2000-2001.

Over $14 million was spent on medical equipment:

  The major equipment included a cardiology

angiography unit for Royal Adelaide Hospital,

CAT scanners for Lyell McEwin Health Service

(LMHS), The Queen Elizabeth Hospital (TQEH)

and the Women s and Children s Hospital (WCH)

and fluoroscopy rooms for TQEH and LMHS. A

DNA sequencer and haematology analyser were

acquired by IMVS at a cost of $1.042 million.

Volunteering policy

South Australia, and particularly human services

agencies in both the government and non-

government sector, is at the forefront of delivering

and managing quality volunteer programs. DHS

supports volunteering by funding non-government

health, housing and community services organisations

to provide services which may include the support of

volunteers. In addition, many consumers of the

department s services are involved in advisory groups

and panels to assist DHS in planning its services.

International Year of the Volunteer

DHS has contributed to the international, national

and state objectives for the International Year of the

Volunteer (IYV 2001) to recognise the valuable

contribution volunteers make to the community and

to their sponsoring agencies.

Mapping of volunteer programs, services and number

of volunteers has revealed 11 000 volunteers, nine

areas of core business and 117 activities/services used

within the portfolio, including hospitals and family

and youth services. DHS has maximized the potential

for agencies to celebrate through fostering regional

partnerships and the allocation of DHS IYV

Celebration Small Grants to volunteer programs with

20 or less volunteers. Site Specific celebrations are

underway across the state with 53 events registered

on the DHS IYV Calendar of Events.

A video is being produced to acknowledge the

volunteer effort across the portfolio; to depict the

diverse range of volunteer services provided; and as a

promotional and recruitment tool by Volunteer

Coordinators.

Financial Services

Financial Services managed the operational

requirements resulting from changes made to the SA

Health Commission Act. Additional management

highlights included establishing a Taxation Services

Team to centralise tax advisory and compliance

services.

Legislative changes

During 2000-2001 significant changes were made to

the South Australian Health Commission Act 1976

(SAHC Act). Powers, functions, assets, rights and

liabilities were transferred from the Health

Commission to the Minister for Human Services.

Many powers were in turn delegated to DHS.

The Health Complaints Bill, which has been tabled in

Parliament, seeks to establish a Commission to process

complaints about the provision of health services

simply and confidentially. The system will cover the

full range of services including public, private and

non-government providers. The Bill enables the

Health Complaints Commissioner to make

recommendations to improve the health system to

reduce the likelihood of similar complaints arising.

Complaints will be dealt with fairly with an emphasis

on conciliation rather than resorting to legal

procedures.

Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management5



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 42

International Year of Volunteers (IYV)

(clockwise from top)

Daniel Badger, Winner of the 2000 Young Australian of the Year for

Community Service. Daniel was nominated for this award by the

Department of Human Services for his volunteer work at The Queen

Elizabeth Hospital.

Child and Youth Health Helpline volunteer, Sacha Palmer, in action.

IYV  National Health &amp; Medical Research Council Awards - Winner of

State Gold Award for Rural: Direct Service Provision and National Silver

Award is Nicola Chapman, Port Pirie Health Service, Volunteer Co-

ordinator. The Award was presented by Dean Brown, Minister for

Human Services.

Margaret Richards (left), president of  The Friends of The Queen

Elizabeth Hospital , and Annie Mandalovic, Volunteer Coordinator at

The QEH, were presented with a National Health &amp; Medical Research

Council IYV Award.

Staff and Volunteers at the Oakden Volunteer Service (North Western

Mental Health Service - Older People) at an IYV morning tea and

Information Day.

Whyalla Hospital &amp; Community Health Volunteers including members of

the  Silver Sirens , Whyalla s Health Promotion Theatre Group. They

sang up a storm in the Whyalla community, reminding all to make

healthy life choices by remembering their health check ups.

(below)

Helen Sykorra heads a volunteer group called RGH Golden Link, which

works to support the Repatriation General Hospital and patient care.

She rallies helpers able to make craft, sell raffle tickets and undertake

various activities within the hospital.

Helen is involved in Foundation Daw Park, which, since her  push 

started, raised $1.7million.

Don t wait until you give up work to volunteer

....volunteering is for everyone. It is a pleasure

that leaves time for leisure!

Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management5 Details on the Food Bill are contained on page 29.
The Minister for Human Services and the Inter

Church Housing Unit (on behalf of the South

Australian Council of Churches) entered a

partnership agreement on 31 August 2000 to

introduce new incentives to make land available for

community housing purposes.

The South Australian Co-operative and Community

Housing (Associated Land Owners) Amendment Bill

2001 was approved by Parliament to enable the

transfer of ownership of joint venture developments,

including all improvements, to a Church or other

joint venture partner (Associated Land Owner)

meeting the criteria following an agreed period of time.

  The amendments provide an incentive to

Churches or other organisations to release land

for housing low income households;

  Ownership of joint venture developments,

including all improvements, will be transferred to

a Church or other joint venture partner

(Associated Land Owner) meeting the criteria

following an agreed period of time (30 years);

  Property management, including tenant selection,

will be the responsibility of community housing

organisations under lease agreement from the

Church or Associated Land Owner;

  Government will retain control over broad

allocation and pricing (rents) policy;

  Churches or Associated Land Owners will be

responsible for the provision of appropriate

support to the tenant households.

Reconciliation (See also Appendix 4 -
Statement of Reconciliation)

The Aboriginal Services Division Strategic Plan 2001-

2004 has been designated the status of a Service

Improvement Plan. The Reconciliation Reference

Committee has been conducting a series of  Landmark

Workshops  to develop a twelve month Reconciliation

Business Plan to ensure progress on the full

implementation of the Aboriginal Services

signposts and the nine action statements

contained in the DHS Statement

of Reconciliation.



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2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 44

Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management5 Quality and National HealthDevelopment Fund Strategic Plan
These strategic plans:

  Are required under Australian Health Care

Agreements (AHCA) to advance quality

improvement and enhance public hospital

services

  Provide an agreed basis for application of

National Health Development Funds (NHDF).

Ongoing funding is conditional on strategic plans

being agreed between SA and the Commonwealth.

The SA Safety and Quality Council oversees quality

initiatives in the State s hospitals and ongoing

development and monitoring of the quality strategic

plan. The NHDF strategic plan includes $15 million

for the implementation of the Open Architecture

Clinical Information System (OACIS) in Adelaide s

eight major metropolitan public hospitals, a project

that includes substantial contribution from the SA

Government. The remaining $6 million will be spent

on projects aimed at primary and community care

services and improving links between these services

and acute system.

Service excellence

The department is conducting a mapping exercise to

ascertain the range of service improvement initiatives

and quality models currently being implemented

across the portfolio. The information will assist the

development of a DHS Service Excellence Framework

and the formation of a DHS Service Excellence

Council. Funding and Service Agreements will

incorporate the requirement for DHS funded service

agencies to demonstrate implementation of the

framework.

Service impacts of asylum seekers

DHS has played an important role in service provision

in this area. The department has been instrumental in

coordinating strategic responses to settlement

processes for Temporary Protection Visa (TPV)

holders and has established an interagency group to

respond to this population group in an integrated

manner.

The main area of involvement has been through the

arrival in urban areas of asylum seekers released from

Commonwealth Detention Centres on TPVs. The

Commonwealth introduced 3 year TPVs in October

1999 as part of its effort to stem the flow of asylum

seekers into the country. Adelaide receives a high

number of TPV holders, primarily from the Woomera

detention centre. Since 30 March 2000, 1185 TPV

holders have been released to Adelaide, which

represents 25% of all releases across Australia.

The initial cost pressures relate to housing, emergency

financial assistance, settlement and health services,

which are provided through Migrant Health. Other

costs being covered by the State Government include

English language classes, access to Job Network

Services, household formation support and providing

culturally appropriate supported accommodation

placements for all 12-15 year olds released from the

detention centre. DHS has contributed to developing

national approaches to the protection of children

who are unaccompanied humanitarian entrants held

in immigration detention centres and to the

arrangements for guardianship once released into the

community. As the Commonwealth does not cover

settlement services, cost pressures fall onto the State

Government. These costs are considerable, especially

as TPV holders arrive in Adelaide at rate of 20-30

people per week.

Code of fair information handling
practices for DHS

DHS s desire to improve service delivery and public

sector efficiency through on-line services makes it

important to address the community s concern for

privacy and its balance with the storage capacity of

technology. As a result, the department is in the

process of developing a Code of Fair Information

Handling Practices.

This important initiative, in line with national and

international standards, will set out standards for the

collection, use, disclosure, and security of client

information.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 45

Human Resource Management System

The Human Resource Management System (HRMS)

Project covers all 30 000 major metropolitan

employees in the DHS portfolio. Working

collaboratively, DHS and the seven Health Units have,

over the past year, determined the user requirements,

proceeded to open tender call, evaluated and selected

a preferred vendor. In April 2001, Cabinet approved

the signing of a contract with Frontier Software Pty

Ltd., which will provide a Bureau Service using their

product, the Complete Human Resource Information

System (CHRIS). CHRIS will provide an integrated

Human Resource and Payroll system, supporting

Human Resources, Payroll, Leave and Absence

Management, Training &amp; Development and

Reporting functions.

The new service will:

  Provide improved workforce planning,

management and development of each Health

Unit site and across the whole DHS portfolio

  Enable the Human Resource focus to move from

administrative support to expert consultation and

advice, providing line managers with tools to

effectively manage HR issues

  Improve HR services through processing

efficiencies, reducing duplication and reducing

manual processes.

Risk management

Following the formation of a single Risk Management

Unit during 2000, a framework for strategic and

systematic risk management is being implemented

across the portfolio.

Clinical Risk Management has been identified as a

priority area and a joint project to strengthen this,

particularly in metropolitan hospitals, has been

established as a partnership between Risk

Management Services, Statewide Division and South

Australian Captive Insurance Corporation

(SAICORP).

Close networks have also been forged with clinical risk

managers both nationally and internationally through

establishing the Australasian Society for Healthcare

Risk Management for which DHS has been a major

sponsor.

State Government Youth Recruitment
Initiative

DHS employs young South Australians through work

experience, ongoing employment or returning to

tertiary study. Commitment to the Graduate

Employment program has continued to grow across a

broad range of disciplines:

2000-2001 Graduate Program Graduates

Generalist 6

Environmentalist 1

Building 2

Journalism 1

Project 6

Human Resources 4

Social Planning 2

Accounting 8

Pharmacy 1

Podiatry 1

Speech Pathology 1

Physiotherapy 1

Research 5

Scientific 1

Dietician 1

Politics 1

Marketing 1

Policy 6

Total 49

Non Graduate (Recruit) Program Trainees

Clerical 53

Finance 2

Information Technology 7

Horticultural 6

Dental Assistants 35

Youth Worker 1

Total 104

Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management5



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 46

Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management5 Workforce development
DHS Senior Executive has led the development of a

Leadership Advantage program during 2000-2001

aimed at senior staff of DHS. The program has been

developed to assist in the ongoing assessment and

development of leadership competencies, which will

ensure that our people contribute to achieving the

strategic objectives of the department. A first group of

16 senior staff from across the portfolio completed

the program at the end of May 2001. Further groups

are scheduled for 2001-2002.

Workforce planning

Aspects of nursing and medical workforce planning

have been consolidated within the Corporate Services

area and a senior officer has been appointed to

provide a range of workforce planning activities.

The workforce planning strategy will provide the

workforce related information required to manage

risk, develop strategies for recruitment,

redeployment, retraining and retirement and the

capacity to achieve current and future objectives. The

next steps in this project are to:

  Develop a workforce planning policy and

framework which will guide and drive workforce

profiling, demand and supply modelling

  Analyse issues which will impact on workforce

availability

  Develop a workforce planning model to achieve

portfolio strategic goals

  Ensure the practice of workforce planning is

sustainable and effective

  Provide an annual portfolio workforce plan

report.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services 47

South Australian Health Commission

Annual Report

Roles and Responsibilities
During 2000-2001 significant changes were

made to the South Australian Health Commission

Act, 1976 (SAHC Act). Powers, functions, assets,
rights and liabilities of the SAHC were

transferred from the Health Commission to the

Minister for Human Services. Many powers were
in turn delegated to the Department of Human

Services. Financial Services successfully

identified and implemented changes to financial
reporting structures and systems to reflect these

changes.

The SA Health Commission (SAHC) has the powers,

rights, duties and functions set out in the SAHC Act.

Its functions under the SAHC Act, which are advisory,

are set out in Section 16 (1). Those functions are:

(a) to the extent determined by the Minister, to

provide advice to the Minister on the

performance of functions conferred on the

Minister under this Act or any other Act;

(b) at the request of the Minister, to provide

information to the Minister on the requirements

of the public, or any section of the public, in the

field of health or health services, or to assist in the

planning of health services;

(c) to develop, foster or promote proper standards

of public and environmental health in the State;

(d) to the extent determined by the Minister, to plan,

initiate, carry out, support or promote programs

or activities designed to improve or promote

public and environmental health;

(e) to increase public awareness of such matters

relating to health as appear to be appropriate to

the Commission or as are designated by the

Minister;

(f) to assist the Minister in the dissemination of

knowledge in the field of public health to the

advancement of the public interest;

(g) at the request of the Minister, to investigate and

report on any matter relevant to public or

environmental health or to health services within

the State;

(h) at the request of the Minister, to conduct

inquiries into any aspect of public or

environmental health, the provision of health

services or the care of the public (or of any

section of the public);

(i) to provide advice to the Minister on action to be

taken to prevent or avert the spread of diseases

that are a danger to the public or on other

matters relevant to the protection or promotion

of public health;

(j) at the request of the Minister, to provide advice

to the Minister on the administration of any

provision of this Act, or of any designated Act, or

on the exercise or performance of powers under

this Act or any designated Act;

(k) at the request of the Minister, to provide advice

on any other matter in relation to which the

Minister considers that the advice of the

Commission should be available;

(l) to carry out other functions assigned to the

Commission by this or under this or any other

Act, or by the Minister;

(m) to carry out other functions as may be necessary,

expedient or incidental to the foregoing.

The Commission has the powers necessary or

expedient for, or incidental to, the performance of its

functions.

The Commission may delegate its powers and

functions pursuant to Section 19 of the SAHC Act.

In the exercise of its functions, the SAHC is:

  subject to the control and direction of the Minister

  required to seek to coordinate its activities with

DHS - the activities of which are outlined in this

Annual Report.

The Commission also has certain specific powers and

functions in the area of public health pursuant to:

  The Food Act, 1985

  The Public and Environmental Health Act, 1982

  The Radiation Protection and Control Act, 1982.



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tSouth Australian Health Commission 48

  Ms Christine Charles, Chairman

(appointed 16 April 1998)

  Professor Brendon Kearney

(appointed 1 December 1998)

  Mr James Davidson

(appointed 25 July 1999)

  Ms Roxanne Ramsey

(appointed 25 July 1999)

  Mr Brian Dixon

(appointed 12 April 2001)

Members of the Commission

DHS/00001/AnnualReport/PRCUnit/Icarus/Finsbury/January2002



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1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-2001

Average daily available beds2 5 060 4 946 4 874 4 725 4 696 4 626 4 566 4 600

Occupancy rate3 75% 70% 71% 73% 73% 72% 72% 73.3%

Admissions:

Overnight stay patients 191 104 191 811 191 007 186 820 190 626 189 545 184 970 179 874

Same day patients 93 471 108 243 115 725 124 852 135 976 146 028 154 407 156 029

Total admissions 284 575 300 054 306 732 311 672 326 602 335 573 339 377 335 903

Admissions /1000 population 194 203 208 210 220 226 227 224

%same day admissions4 33% 36% 38% 40% 42% 44% 45% 46.5%

Average length of stay5 4.9 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.1 4.0 4.0 4.1

Occupied bed days 1 384 989 1 327 567 1 334 187 1 336 473 1 342 230 1 356 240 1 347 819 1 387 032

Non-inpatients6 :

Casualty 377 433 414 369 435 378 438 103 455 659 461 256 463 044 472 067

Outpatients7 1 323 714 1 356 247 1 384 580 1 389 401 1 453 209 1 418 887 1 483 803 1 471 176

Source: Data sourced from the Monthly Management Summary System.

Hospital Activity Statistics1

1 This table contains data for all public recognised hospitals, including

the Pregnancy Advisory Centre and Torrens House.

2 The average number of beds available for use by patients in the course

of the year.

3 The ratio of occupied beds divided by annual available beds. This

excludes day only patients treated in designated day only facilities.

4 Population figures represent the mean resident population of South

Australia as estimated by the Australian Bureau of Statistics for that

financial year.

5 The average number of days all admitted patients spent in hospital,

including day only patients.

6 The increases in non-admitted patient activity reflect, in part, trends in

the use of these services and, in part, the results by the DHS to

improve the quality of data reported. It should be noted that the series

has changed from reporting attendances at outpatient and casualty

clinics (for the years 1990-91 to 1992-93) to occasion of service at

each clinic (from 1993-94).

7 Excludes private outpatients.

1 Appendix



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50

HR Summary

Non-Executive Employment, 30 June 2001

Head Count FTE s

Classification Male Female Total Ongoing Contract Casual Total

Trainees 12 30 42 42 42

ASO1 23 167 190 121.9 37.5 8.3 167.7

ASO2 75 299 374 281.0 70.8 351.8

ASO3 53 190 243 193.4 37.4 230.8

ASO4 176 206 382 336.0 40.4 376.4

ASO5 140 174 314 240.5 59.1 299.6

ASO6 100 111 211 169.9 35.6 205.5

ASO7 39 39 78 65.8 10.8 76.6

ASO8 37 29 66 55.6 9.8 65.4

MAS1 2 2 4 4.0 4.0

MAS2 26 32 58 48.8 9.0 57.8

MAS3 4 1 5 5.0 5.0

Public Advocate 1 1 1.0 1.0

President GBoard 1 1 1.0 1.0

Total 677 1 250 1 927 1 523.9 310.4 8.3 1842.6

PSO1 72 227 299 207.3 71.2 0.6 279.1

PSO2 30 92 122 86.5 27.6 114.1

PSO3 34 47 81 67.4 12.0 79.4

PSO4 7 2 9 8.0 1.0 9.0

PSO5 5 5 4.0 1.0 5.0

MPS1 1 1 1.0 1.0

MPS3 1 1 1.0 1.0

Total 150 368 518 374.2 113.8 0.6 488.6

OPS1 11 5 16 2 9.4 3 14.4

OPS1A 30 29 59 3 39.4 42.4

OPS2 54 37 91 32.6 25.7 23.3 81.6

OPS2A 42 105 147 62.2 42.8 10.4 115.4

OPS3 79 31 110 99.4 8 2 109.4

OPS3A 28 42 70 44.2 18.1 0.7 63

OPS4 21 12 33 29.6 3 32.6

OPS4A 25 23 48 37.2 7.3 1 45.5

OPS5 11 7 18 17 1 18

OPS5A 3 1 4 3 1 4

Total 304 292 596 327.2 119.3 79.8 526.3

2 Appendix
Employment numbers



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Non-Executive Employment, 30 June 2001

Head CountHead CountHead CountHead CountHead Count FTE sFTE sFTE sFTE sFTE s

Classification Male Female Total Ongoing Contract Casual Total

TGO0 1 1 1.0 1

TGO2 5 3 8 8.0 8

TGO3 6 6 5.0 1.0 6

TGO4 2 2 2.0 2

Total 14 3 17 16.0 1.0 0 17.0

RN1 2 2 1.0 1.0

RN2 8 8 5.7 1.5 7.2

RN3 1 1 1.0 1.0

RN3A 1 6 7 6.0 1.0 7.0

RN3B 1 1 1.0 1.0

RN4 1 1 1.0 1.0

MD1 1 1 0.7 0.7

MD2 5 2 7 5.8 1.0 6.8

MD3A 1 1 1.0 1.0

MD3C 1 1 1.0 1.0

MDP3 2 2 1.8 1.8

MDP4 3 3 2.1 2.1

Total 8 27 35 24.6 7.0 0 31.6

HAE1 2 2 0.8 0.5 1.3

HAE2 1 5 6 1.6 2.6 0.1 4.3

HAE3 2 8 10 2.0 3.1 1.8 6.9

HAE4 2 1 3 2.0 1.0 3.0

HAE5 1 1 1.0 1.0

GSE1 7 7 3.5 3.5

GSE3 1 1 2 2.0 2.0

GSE4 1 1 1.0 1.0

GSE5 1 1 1.0 1.0

GSE6 1 1 1.0 1.0

MET11 1 1 1.0 1.0

Total 11 24 35 16.9 7.2 1.9 26.0

Grand Total 1 176 1 994 3 170 2 282.8 600.7 90.6 2 974.1

Notes:

Figures only include PSM Act employees.

The figures do not include employees on Leave without pay in June 2001

The figures exclude HomeStart Finance.

Appendix 2: HR Summary2



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services and
South Australian Health Commission

52

LeadershipSA

Leave management

DHS staff participated in a range of LeadershipSA

activities during 2000-2001, including the Senior

Management Program, the Public Sector

Management course and the First Line Management

Program. In addition the DHS Workforce

Development Centre provides a corporate,

professional and human resource service to DHS

employees and its service delivery units, careers

consulting, strategic workforce planning, liaison

between DHS and the University and vocational

education sectors and workforce development

(training and development).

DHS values and strives for leadership of the highest

quality. Programs provided by DHS to support this

include the Influential Leadership Program, the Self

Study Management Program and a range of short

course programs.

1998-99 1999-2000 2000-2001

Average number of sick leave days per FTE 7.0 7.0 6.5

Average number of family carer leave days taken per FTE - - 0.15

Executive Employment,  30 June 2001

Head Count FTE s

Approved
Classification Executive Positions Male Female Untenured Tenured

CE 1 1

EXD 4 3 1 3 1

EXC (EL3) 7 8 1 3 6

EXB (EL2) 15 6 9 3 12

EXA (EL1) 17 16 5 3 18

Total 44 33 17 12 38

Notes: The figures exclude HomeStart Finance.

Appendix 2: HR Summary2



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services and
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53

The DHS has maintained its commitment to

employing and promoting on merit regardless of race,

gender, sexuality, marital status, pregnancy, physical

or intellectual impairment. However, DHS has also

explored appropriate strategies, including positive

discrimination, to provide opportunities to increase

the number of targeted population groups, e.g.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, employed

within the portfolio. The Workforce Management

Branch is committed to working with the Aboriginal

Services Division in achieving our commitments in the

DHS Statement of Reconciliation to actively work

towards increasing the number of Aboriginal people

employed within the Portfolio and the number in

decision making positions.

Fraud detection

There were no instances of fraud detected within the

DHS during the 2000-2001 financial year. The DHS

has an expectation of sound corporate governance

and strong controls throughout its areas of

responsibility and has established risk management

initiatives and controls to achieve this.

A number of key initiatives have been developed and

implemented to ensure DHS is using a continuous

improvement model for OHS&amp;IM. They include:

  The formation of an over-arching committee to

manage these areas, while still maintaining

individual committees to address areas unique to

health, housing and FAYS

  The calling of a statewide tender to address the

training needs of the organisation

  The development of risk management and

actions plans

  Continuation of the provision of Internal Audit

Training programs to ensure sufficient competent

people are available to undertake internal audits

of systems across DHS

  The development and distribution of a CD-ROM

 Manual Handling Guidelines for Health and

Aged Care Industries . This is considered as a

major step in efforts to reduce manual handling

injuries, and covers all areas of an organisation s

manual handling needs.

The major focus of the Workforce Health and Safety

Unit has been developing and implementing a systems

approach to OHS&amp;IM that is consistent with the

WorkCover Performance Standards for Exempt

Employers. Policies and procedures have been

reviewed targeting the major risk areas. A major

review was undertaken in relation to dealing with

violence in the workplace particularly in service

delivery areas.

Appendix 2: HR Summary2
Equal opportunity programs Occupational Health, Safety

and Injury Management
(OHS&amp;IM)



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South Australian Health Commission

5461

FAYS 2000-2001

New claims 138 Cost $480 998.28

Total outstanding claims 203 Cost $2 361 615.63

Housing 2000-2001

New claims 35 Cost $302 494.64

Total outstanding claims 51 Cost $575 968.55

DHS Divisional 2000-2001

New claims 36 Cost $307 964.13

Total outstanding claims 45 Cost $795 970.41

DHS Central 2000-2001

New claims 209 Cost $1 091 457.05

Total outstanding claims 299 Cost $3 733 554.59

WorkCover liabilities

Appendix 2: HR Summary2



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services and
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55

Destination No. of Paid by Paid by SLWP Days Total Cost Reason for Travel
employees DHS ($) Travelled

China 1 World Health $0 $0 14 $0 Temporary technical adviser to Chinese Govt.
Organisation in order to implement immunisation course in
(WHO) China.

Japan 1 World Health $0 $2 874 7 $2 874 Attendance at three meetings on
Organisation poliomyelitis eradication in Kyoto, Japan.
(WHO)

USA 1 $7 000 $0 11 $7 000 Attendance at American Society of
Healthcare Risk Managers and presentation
to Patient Care Assessment Council in USA.

China 1 $6 336 $0 13 $6 336 Participation in a Child &amp; Family delegation to
China.

USA 1 SIGNAL $205 $1 200 8 $1 405 Attendance at 2nd Biennial 5 A Day
International Symposium in USA.

USA/UK 1 Medical Board $1 050 $1 657 18 $2 707 Attendance at Federation of State Medical
of SA/Self-funded Boards USA Conference and American

College of Physician Executives Conference in USA.

USA/Canada 1 $10 725 $1 810 9 $12 535 Attendance at OACIS Healthcare Users Group
and Quality Council Meeting in Florida, USA.

USA 1 National $0 $1 700 8 $1 700 Convening of an international group of
Institute of Investigators researching urinary
Health (USA) incontinence in Washington DC, USA.

Philippines 1 World Health $0 $2 053 5 $2 053 Attendance at an Informal Consultation -
Organisation Regional Strategy on Surveillance and
(WHO) Outbreak Response for the Western Pacific

Region of WHO in Manila, Philippines.

Philippines 1 World Health $0 $2 093 5 $2 093 Temporary adviser to Western Pacific Region
Organisation WHO at a meeting on national capacity in
(WHO) environmental health in Manila, Philippines.

USA 1 American $0 $1 318 8 $1 318 Presentation of paper at Annual Conference
Water Works of the American Water Works Association in
Association Washington DC, USA.

Total $25 316 $14 705 $40 021

Appendix 2: HR Summary2
Department of Human Services
Overseas Travel 2000-2001



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56

Financial Performance

Contractual Arrangements

There was only one contract greater than $4 million.

Modbury Public Hospital Torrens Valley Private

Hospital Amending Agreement 19 August 1997.

The key objective was to amend agreements,

executed 3 February 1995, that provided for the

management and operation by Healthscope of the

Modbury Public Hospital, the Head Lease of the site

of Modbury Public Hospital from the SAHC to the

Modbury Public Hospital Board (Board), an

Underlease of a portion of the site of Modbury Public

Hospital from the Board to Healthscope and for the

design, construction and commissioning of a 65 bed

acute medical, surgical and obstetrics hospital adjacent

to Modbury Private Hospital.

Private sector participant

Healthscope Limited

Duration

The term of the amending agreement is the term of

the agreement it amends: expires on 5 February 2010

Assets transferred

None

Contingent and other liabilities

None

Number and value of accounts paid for 2000 - 2001

Number Value

Paid by due date 73 090 $2 235 139 406

Paid late and paid 30 days or less from due date 23 758 $57 714 208

Paid late &amp; paid more than 30 days from due date 11 812 $52 253 479

3 Appendix
Account Payment Performance



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57

Consultancies below $10 000  $

Total Consultants below $10 000 12         65 092

Consultancies $10 000 to $50 000 Consultant  $

Probity Advisory on Whole of Government Pharmaceuticals PSI Consulting

Review of Health Agencies for FBT Arthur Andersen

Aboriginal Health Worker Review SA Centre for Rural &amp; Remote Health

Dental Financing Options Paper Strategic Partners

Best Practice Management of Motor Vehicles Marion SmartBiz

Review of Aboriginal Family Support Service Margaret Hunter

Evaluation of Parenting SA Health Outcomes International

Out of Sight   Not Out of Mind Project Health Outcomes International

Communications Strategy Socom Public Relations

Adelaide Metropolitan Bed Planning Project John Bissett &amp; Associates

Review of Public Health Education, Training &amp; Research MA International

Development of In Situ Remediation Regimes to reduce exposure of lead to children at Pt PirieCSIRO Land &amp; Water

Design Better Health Care in south Flinders University

Performance Specification for Wide Area Network Gibson Quai

Managing Challenging Behaviours COPE

Youth Court Review Prodirections

Review of Metro Aboriginal Youth Team Arthur Andersen

Medical Operating Plan for SOCOG Dr Bruce Mugford

New Food Bill / Regulations Austin Williams Public Relations

Review of Mental Health Act &amp; Detention Orders in SA MA International

Review of Alternative Care Des Semple &amp; Associates

2000 Annual Nursing Survey Data Rawinski Management

Total Consultancies $10 000 to $50 000 22    605 959

External Consultancies

Department of Human Services

The DHS engaged the following consultants in 2000-2001:

South Australian Health Commission

The SAHC did not engage any consultants in 2000-2001.

Appendix 3: Financial Performance3



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58

Consultancies &gt; $50 000 Consultant $

Design &amp; Implement Executive Leadership

Development Program Wintercraig Consulting

Review of Rehabilitation Services P Milne &amp; Associates

GST Project Ernst &amp; Young

ICU Review MA International

Human Resource Management Replacement Project Cap Gemini Ernst Young

Total Consultancies &gt; $50 000 5    1 205 907

Appendix 3: Financial Performance3



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services and
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59

The Department of Human Services affirms that

we will work towards:

A united Australia, which respects this land of

ours, values the Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander heritage and provides justice and equity

for all.

(Vision of the Council of Aboriginal Reconciliation)

The Department of Human Services recognises

Aboriginal people as the first Australians, with a

unique culture and spiritual relationship to the land

and seas. The Department of Human Services is

strongly committed to improving the cultural,

spiritual, health, emotional and economic wellbeing of

Indigenous people in this State.

The Department of Human Services is committed to

informing Aboriginal people of their right to

accessible and equitable services and to avenues to

redress any grievances experienced.

Statement of Reconciliation

We commit the Department of Human Services to

achieving reconciliation by:

  actively working to increase the number of

Aboriginal people employed within the portfolio;

  actively working to increase the number of

Aboriginal people in decision-making positions;

  addressing the disproportionate number of

Aboriginal people in institutions; especially within

the juvenile justice, child protection and

alternative care systems;

  actively working to eliminate systemic racism in

the workplace;

  incorporating Aboriginal needs, issues and

positive outcomes in all our planning, including

consultation with key constituents and Aboriginal

communities;

  actively supporting and implementing

recommendations from the Royal Commission

into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody and the

national Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander Children from their

Families;

  increasing the understanding of Aboriginal

identity and experience in the portfolio and in

the broader community;

  actively promoting the needs of Aboriginal

people across government and in the general

community; and

  providing leadership in the reconciliation process

between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal South

Australians.

4 Appendix



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60

ACIS Assessment and Crisis Intervention Services

AHA Aboriginal Housing Authority

CABS Condition of Asset Based System

CAMHS Child Adolescent Mental Health Service

CCU Careers Consulting Unit

DETE Department of Employment, Training and
Education

DHS Department of Human Services

FAYS Family and Youth Services

FMC Flinders Medical Centre

GRF Gamblers  Rehabilitation Fund

HACC Home and Community Care

ILEP Independent Living Equipment Program

IMVS Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science

LIS Library Information System

NGO Non-Government Organisation

NWHP National Women s Health Program

Acronyms and Abbreviations,
   Glossary of Terms

OACIS Open Architecture Clinical Information
System

PATS Patient Assistance Transport Scheme

RAH Royal Adelaide Hospital

RGH Repatriation General Hospital

SAAP Supported Accommodation Assistance Program

SACHA South Australian Community Housing
Authority

SAHC South Australian Health Commission

SAHT South Australian Housing Trust

SAICORP South Australian Captive Insurance
Corporation

SERCIS Social and Economic Risk Context
Information System

TQEH The Queen Elizabeth Hospital

TVSP Targeted Voluntary Separation Package

WRAPT Women s Rural Access Project and Training

Acronyms and Abbreviations

5 Appendix



2 0 0 0 - 2 0 0 1  A n n u a l  R e p o r tDepartment of Human Services and
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61

Appendix 5: Acronyms and Abbreviations, Glossary of Terms5
Glossary of Terms

Acute care hospital services

A hospital that provides at least minimum medical,

surgical or obstetric services for inpatient treatment

and/or care, and around-the-clock, comprehensive,

qualified nursing services, as well as other necessary

professional services.

Alternative care for children and young
people

The care of children and young people away from

homes where the parents or guardians are unable or

unwilling to provide adequate care. Case

Management of these children is provided by FAYS.

Anti-poverty

Provision of a range of financial support and

counselling services by FAYS; for example, community

education, financial counselling, concessions, funeral

assistance, direct financial assistance to families in

crisis, and assisting sections of the community to

develop services to assist them to become self

sufficient.

Business strategies

A subset of the strategies contained in the Strategic

Directions section to be developed and linked to

Business Plans of respective divisions and business

units.

Child protection

The investigation and assessment of safety, risk, and

the needs of children and families where children

have been or are at risk of abuse and neglect. It also

involves the coordination of services to strengthen

and preserve families, reunification and family

contact, and the placement of children and young

people in alternative care where appropriate.

Children under guardianship

Children under the age of 18 years whose legal

guardian is the Minister for Human Services.

Community health services

Services including health services for individuals,

groups and communities delivered in a community

setting, rather than via hospitals or private facilities.

Continuum of care

A pattern of seamless service delivery of care ranging

from the prevention and promotion of health and

wellbeing, to community based care for population

groups, individuals and families to the critical, acute

hospital based services (for example, hospitals)

provided by the portfolio.

Governance

The act and rules by which an organisation is

managed and directed.

Greatest need

This term refers to targeting of population groups

which demonstrate high levels of need to fulfil the

basic wellbeing of the individual and community.

Integrated community planning

A strategic planning process which assesses the extent

of Human Services resources available in an area, such

as a country region, and develops a response to the

priority needs of the community. The underlying

principle is that to be effective at the level where

services are delivered, planning must take a holistic

view of service provision in each region, so that

resources are integrated to meet the needs of

individuals, families and communities.

Juvenile justice

Young people (10-18 years) enter the Juvenile Justice

System when they have committed an offence.



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Portfolio

The portfolio of Human Service includes the

Department of Human Services and funded agencies

responsible to the Minister for Human Services, and

the Minister for Disability Services and Minister for

the Ageing. The funded agencies include SA Health

Commission and its health units, SA Housing Trust,

Aboriginal Housing Authority, SA Community

Housing Authority, HomeStart Finance, Family and

Youth Services.

Primary care

Refers to community based services delivered by a

wide range of providers across the entire spectrum of

human services. The primary care system is seen as the

usual point of contact for people seeking assistance

with health or social problems, support for living and

chronic illness or disability, housing and

accommodation and advice.

Primary health care

It is generally referred to non-institutional health care

services, including medical treatment and advice

provided by GPs. It includes:

  services provided by community pharmacies

  therapy and treatment services such as

counselling, allied health services and community

nursing in non-institutional settings or in the

home; and

  preventive strategies such as health promotion,

early identification, early prevention and

information services

  community health services.

Providers

The organisation which produces or delivers goods

and services (outputs) on behalf of the purchaser.

Key drivers

These are key factors that have significant influence

on the Department of Human Services or Human

Services Portfolio s directions, client services and

resources. Some of the factors include the policies and

frameworks of the Commonwealth and State

governments, the state of the economy, the needs of

the clients or user groups and the high cost in

providing services due to increasing demand and

demographic changes, and priorities of the

department.

Mission

A statement of the business purpose; why does the

organisation exist.

Outcomes

The results the Government seeks in order to meet

community needs and Government priorities. They

are usually achieved over a longer period.

Partnership

A collaborative approach between parties, for

example community groups, state and local

government agencies and so on to achieve an agreed

outcome in the best interest of the community,

individuals and families.

Population groups

These are groups of people who have special needs

and are vulnerable due to social and economic

factors. The groups identified include: Aboriginal

people, children and young people at risk, people

with disability, people with mental health needs, older

people, homeless people, people on low income and

people from diverse cultural backgrounds and

families.

Appendix 5: Acronyms and Abbreviations, Glossary of Terms5



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Quality of life

Refers to the health, wellbeing and level of

contentment of individuals, families and communities.

Strategic management process/framework

A framework which incorporates strategic and

operational planning, budgeting and financial

planning, monitoring, evaluation, reporting of

performance agreements or purchase agreements.

Linkage with strategic resource plans on information

technology, asset management and workforce

planning is gained through the business planning

process. This framework is guided by the Government

objectives through the Government Management

Framework (GMF).

Sustainable community

A cohesive, healthy, resourceful and prosperous

community. It can be characterised as one which is

self-reliant as a result of strong formal and informal

supports and networks. It also has a diverse, vibrant

and growing economic base which provides

opportunities for meaningful employment and a level

of economic self-sufficiency and independence. It

contributes to a sense of inclusion, belonging and self-

worth among its members. It will also offer a safe,

clean and high quality living environment, free from

pollution, risks and hazards and a choice of amenities

and experiences.

Urban regeneration

A collaborative process designed to address relative

disadvantage in a community and to improve and

sustain quality of life for its members, by working with

the community to build on its resources, services, and

networks.

Values

Our preferred way of working; what constitutes a

good working environment, including our

relationship with colleagues. The way we behave is

underpinned by our values.

Vision

A statement about what we want our organisation to

become over the next 3 to 5 years.

Wellbeing

Refers to physical and social wellbeing of people.

Wellbeing is affected by interrelationships with other

people and their environment.

Appendix 5: Acronyms and Abbreviations, Glossary of Terms5



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Freedom of Information

Information Statement

The Freedom of Information Act 1991 gives members

of the public a legally enforceable right to access

information held by the South Australian

Government, subject to certain restrictions.

Structure and functions of DHS

The structure and functions of DHS, including the

various divisions that report to the Chief Executive,

are shown at the front of this report, and provide an

overview of the reporting lines of responsibility. The

direction of DHS is also influenced by the input of

advisory boards and committees.

Functions of DHS affecting the public

DHS s work directly impacts on the public in the areas

of health and community services, welfare services,

housing planning, strategy development, major

projects and library services. FAYS is involved with

child protection (including training of mandated

notifiers), keeping families together, and assisting

disadvantaged members of the community.

Public participation

The public can contribute to policy development

within DHS in a number of ways. DHS uses external

expertise and policy advice through statutory and

non-statutory advisory committees, which are

comprised of both government and non-government

representatives. Advice is taken from peak NGOs and

a consultative process may be undertaken in the

planning, development and implementation of policy.

DHS consults with major consumer groups, circulates

discussion papers, calls for submissions on particular

topics, and convenes public meetings in metropolitan

and country areas.

Types of documents held by DHS

DHS holds various health, community services and

housing publications, including administrative and

client files, books, discussion and background papers,

reports, reviews, serial publications, pamphlets, codes

of practice, surveys, guidelines, policies, programs,

strategies, directories, evaluations, needs assessments

and proposals. Other documents held include

procedure manuals, administrative circulars on

general management, finance, staffing, plant and

equipment, property, motor vehicles and industrial

circulars.

DHS s libraries keep information on where DHS

publications are stored, and whether or not they are

free, for sale, or for inspection. Most documents can

be viewed in the libraries, and may be photocopied at

a moderate cost per page.

6 Appendix



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The addresses of the DHS libraries are as follows:

Community Services and Health

AGC House

Level 2, 162 Grenfell Street

Adelaide South Australia 5000

Telephone: 8226 6071 (Health)

Telephone: 8226 7033 (FAYS)

Facsimile: 8226 6677 (Health and FAYS)

Housing, Environment and Planning

1st floor, Roma Mitchell House

136 North Terrace

Adelaide South Australia 5000

Telephone: 8303 0610

Facsimile: 8303 0611

Health Promotion SA has a small range of free anti-

smoking stickers, leaflets and information sheets

available.

Telephone: 8226 6329.

The constitutions of hospitals and health centres

incorporated under the South Australian Health

Commission Act 1976 may be inspected in the

Parliamentary and Legal Unit, 10th floor, 11-13

Hindmarsh Square, Adelaide.

Telephone: 8226 6178.

Arrangements and Procedures for seeking
access to records

Applications for access to, or amendment of, DHS

health related documents should be addressed to:

FOI Liaison Officer (Health)

Department of Human Services

10th floor, Citi Centre

11 Hindmarsh Square

Adelaide SA 5000

Telephone: 8226 6178

Application for access to or amendment of FAYS

documents should be addressed to:

FOI Liaison Officer (FAYS)

Department of Human Services

1st floor, Citi Centre

11 Hindmarsh Square

Adelaide SA 5000

Telephone: 8226 6707

Application for access to or amendment of SAHT

documents should be addressed to:

FOI Liaison Officer (SAHT)

South Australian Housing Trust

Riverside Centre

North Terrace

Adelaide SA 5000

GPO Box 1669

Adelaide SA 5001

Telephone: 8207 0227

Appendix 6: Freedom of Information6



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Aborigines

Port Augusta Aboriginal Families Project: an initiative of

Family and Youth Services, South Australian Housing

Trust and Port Augusta Hospital / by Sharon McCallum,

report preparation by Kerry Roberts. Port Augusta, S.

Aust. : Dept. of Human Services, 2000

We took the children: a speech made by Andrew Hall at

a public forum for Aboriginal Reconciliation in the

Adelaide Town Hall on Wednesday 10 May 2000 / by

Andrew Hall. Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services,

2000

Aged

Aged Care Assessment Program South Australia

Evaluation Unit report: January - June 1999 / by Greg

Holmes. [et al.]: Adelaide: Information Management

Services, Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Aged Care Assessment Program South Australia

Evaluation Unit report: July - December 1999 / Greg

Holmes and Helen Christopher: Adelaide:

Information Management Services, Dept. of Human

Services, 2000

Ageing and the economy in South Australia: social

capital and productive Ageing / Rob Ranzijn and Gary

Andrews; in association with Jane Harford, Carol

Grbich and Mary Luszcz: Adelaide: Dept. of Human

Services, 2000

Home and community care assessment cocktail: the right

mix or a quick fix?: Two day national assessment

workshop, 29-30 November 1999, workshop

proceedings / Home and Community Care Program

(Australia), South Australia. Adelaide: Dept. of

Human Services, 2000

Older person survey October 2000: prepared for

Strategic Planning and Policy, Department of Human

Services, South Australia / Anne Taylor: Adelaide:

Centre for Population Studies in Epidemiology, Dept.

of Human Services, 2001

Older South Australians: the facts : selected information

and statistics for the general community: Adelaide:

Dept. of Human Services, 1999

Reducing the use of benzodiazepines in insomnia

management: final report: Adelaide: Dept. of Human

Services, 2000

Community Health

Populations, policy &amp; people: understanding the links

between community health services and non-

government organisations in two regions of South

Australia: Adelaide: South Australian Community

Health Research Unit, 2001

Metropolitan community health services review.

Adelaide: Metropolitan Division, Dept. of Human

Services, 2001

Disability Services

Disability services planning and funding framework

2000 - 2003: consultation document. Adelaide:

Country and Disability Services Division, Dept. of

Human Services, 2000

Disability Services planning and funding framework

2000   2003: Adelaide: Country and Disability

Services Division, Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Promoting independence: disability action plans for

South Australia: a policy statement on the adoption of

disability action plans by the government of South

Australia: Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Emergency Services

Emergency and trauma services implementation plan

2000-2011: Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services,

2000

Family and Youth Services

2000 - 2002 strategic directions and business strategies:

Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Departmental Reports &amp; Publications7 Appendix



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Gambling

A chance in the game of life: gambling awareness

workshops for young migrants aged 16 - 25 years old:

Adelaide]: Migrant Health Service, Adelaide

Central Community Health Service, 2000

Health Promotion

Better outcomes for chronic obstructive pulmonary

disease: the ACCORD Project, a summary report:

Adelaide: Health Outcomes Unit, Epidemiology

Branch, Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Healthy horizons: a framework for improving the

health of rural, regional and remote Australians:

Report, South Australia 2000: Adelaide: Country

and Disability Services Division, Department of

Human Services, 2000

Recommendations for tobacco education: a review of

tobacco education for school aged youth / Loris Glass

[for ATMAT]: Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services,

2000

Health Services

Healthy start: implementation plan 2000-2011:

Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services, 2000

The Second Australian Computer Assisted Telephone

Interview (CATI) Population Health Surveys Forum:

proceedings: Adelaide - South Australia February

2000: Adelaide: Centre for Population Studies in

Epidemiology, Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Whyalla health survey, April 2000 / by Eleonora Dal

Grande: Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Wrapt: women s rural access project and training:

project report of the Rural Young Womens  Health and

Well-being Peer Education Project / National

Women s Health Program (Australia). [et al.]:

Adelaide: Rural Regional Health Services, Dept. of

Human Services, 2000

HIV

Towards a fourth South Australian HIV strategy:

Adelaide: Communicable Disease Control Branch,

Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Hospitals

Policy for the management of elective surgical

admissions in metropolitan hospitals: Adelaide: Dept.

of Human Services, 2000

Promoting safety and quality in South Australian

hospitals: Adelaide, S. Aust. : Dept. of Human

Services, Statewide Division, Strategy and Operations

Service, 2000.

Renal and Urology Services implementation plan 2000

  2011: Adelaide: Statewide Division, Strategy and

Operations Service, Dept. of Human Services, 2000

South Australian critical care student intake

requirements, 2000-2004 : report / by Edward

Rawinski. [et al.]: Adelaide : Dept. of Human Services,

2000

Housing

Homelessness is more than house-less-ness: partnerships

in practice : coordinated service responses for homeless

people with complex needs / prepared by Julie

Patterson; on behalf of the Department of Human

Services Linkages and Protocols for Homeless People

Advisory Group: Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services,

2000

SA Housing Trust strategic plan, 1999-2002: Adelaide :

Department of Human Services, 2000

SA Housing Trust Annual Report and Trust in Focus.

1999-2000

Chronological History of the South Australian

Housing Trust 1936 - 1999

Appendix 7: Departmental Reports &amp; Publications7



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Human services

Human services in the South Australian information

economy: Adelaide: Information Management Services,

Dept. of Human Services, 2000

A review of accreditation processes utilised by country

regional health services and metropolitan community

based health services, July 2000: Adelaide: Metropolitan

Division and Country and Disability Services Division,

Dept. of Human Services, 2000

2000 inventory of hospitals, residential aged care facilities,

day therapy centres, community health centres,

community mental health services, domiciliary care

services, supported residential facilities: Adelaide:

Information Management Services, Dept. of Human

Services, 2000

Immunization

SA immunisation resource kit: incorporating model

standing drug orders / written, compiled and edited by

Ann Kempe, Claire Nayda: Adelaide: SA Immunisation

Coordination Unit, Communicable Disease Control

Branch, Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Legislation

Food safety legislation South Australia July 2000:

Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Review of the Public and Environmental Health Act 1987

discussion paper: Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services,

2000

Medical Records

SA community health and special needs services: a user

manual for the retention and destruction of clinical and

client-related records: operational records disposal schedule

no. 2000/0013: Adelaide: Medical Record Advisory

Unit, Dept. of Human Services, 2000

South Australian medical record documentation and data

capture standards: Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services,

2000

South Australian morbidity coding standards and

guidelines (Inpatients): effective 1 July 2000 / South

Australia. Medical Record Advisory Service: Adelaide:

Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Mental Health

A new millennium: a new beginning: mental health in

South Australia implementation plan 2000-2005:

Adelaide: Mental Health Services, Department of

Human Services, 2000

Migrant Health

Working with interpreters: why you should use

interpreters to bridge the communication gap / by John

Apostolakis, South Australia. Migrant Health Service:

Adelaide: Migrant Health Service, 2000

Palliative care

Report to Parliament on palliative care in South

Australia: Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services, 2000

Radiological Services

Advice to the Department of Human Services from the

Radiology Network Reference Group, in relation to the

expansion of teleradiology in rural South Australia:

Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services, 1999

Violence

Interpersonal violence and abuse survey, September

1999: Adelaide: Epidemiology Branch, Dept. of

Human Services, 2001

Appendix 7: Departmental Reports &amp; Publications7


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