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h uman   s e r v i c e s

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES   ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

South Australian Health Commission
11 Hindmarsh Square, Adelaide
South Australia 5000

Telephone 8226 7014
Facsimile 8226 6778

This Annual Report is also available 
on the Department of Human Services 
website http://www.dhs.sa.gov.au

h uman   s e r v i c e s

COMMUNITY
INCLUSION  
PARTICIPATION 
COORDINATION 
INTEGRATION
ACCESS
EQUITY
PREVENTION
EARLY 
INTERVENTION
QUALITY
SAFETY
DIVERSITY
WORKING TOGETHER 
REDISTRIBUTING 
RESOURCES
RESPECT
WELLBEING
COMMUNICATION 
QUALITY OF LIFE 
SERVICE 
EXCELLENCE
SOUND MANAGEMENT
IMPROVING 
SERVICES
BETTER OUTCOMES

COMMUNITY
INCLUSION  
PARTICIPATION 
COORDINATION 
INTEGRATION
ACCESS
EQUITY
PREVENTION
EARLY 
INTERVENTION
QUALITY
SAFETY
DIVERSITY
WORKING TOGETHER 
REDISTRIBUTING 
RESOURCES
RESPECT
WELLBEING
COMMUNICATION 
QUALITY OF LIFE 
SERVICE 
EXCELLENCE
SOUND MANAGEMENT
IMPROVING 
SERVICES
BETTER OUTCOMES

DHS / 00032 / PLU / Corporate Profi le / Hyde Park Press / March 2003

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h uman   s e r v i c e s

ISSN 1446 4403

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

South Australian Health Commission
11 Hindmarsh Square, Adelaide
South Australia 5000

Telephone 8226 7014
Facsimile 8226 6778

This Annual Report is also available on the 
Department of Human Services website 
http://www.dhs.sa.gov.au

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ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

HUMAN
SERVICES
AT A GLANCE

Each week in South Australia in 2001 02:

  8 993 people were treated in accident and emergency in public hospitals

  28 240 services were provided at public outpatient clinics

  6 495 people were admitted to public hospitals

  3 049 same-day admissions occurred in public hospitals

  1 309 women were screened for breast cancer

  12 739 doses of vaccines were distributed

  182 customers applied for public housing and 85 properties were allocated to new tenants

  46 loans were settled to enable low income South Australians to access and maintain affordable home ownership

  9 South Australian Community Housing Authority properties were completed

  3 low income and special needs customers (indigenous and non-indigenous) were provided with financial assistance to access
or maintain private rental accommodation under the Aboriginal Housing Authority s Private Rental Accommodation Scheme

  8 054 people were visited by a Royal District Service Nurse

  500 families or individuals received financial counselling and support

  78 Alternative Care placements were made (not including respite placements)

  1 737 people donated blood

  590 calls were received by the Child Abuse Report Line

  1000 calls were received by Crisis Care

  331 babies were born



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

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CONTENTS

Letter of Transmittal 3

Chief Executive s Report 4

Portfolio Responsibilities and Structure 7
  Organisational Chart: Human Service Portfolio Services prior to 6 March 2002 9
  Organisational Chart: Human Service Portfolio Services at 30 June 2002 10

Ministerial Portfolio Responsibilities (Acts administered) 11

Boards and Committees 13

Strategic Direction 1: Improving services for better outcomes 16

Strategic Direction 2: Increasing the State s capacity to promote quality of life 26

Strategic Direction 3: Redistributing resources in a changing environment 37

Strategic Direction 4: Strengthening a culture of working together 44

Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management 47

Promoting Independence: Disability Action Plans for SA 52

South Australian Health Commission Annual Report 55

Departmental Ethics and Privacy Committee 56

Appendix 1: Hospital Activity Statements 57

Appendix 2: Human Resource Summary 58
  Employment Numbers 58
  Human Resource, Leadership and Management Development 60
  Leave Management 61
  Workforce Diversity 62
  Equal Opportunity Employment Programs 63
  Fraud 64
  Occupational Health, Safety and Injury Management 64
  Overseas Travel Report 2001 02 for Public Sector Management Act employees 65
  Energy Efficiency Action Plan Report 65

Appendix 3: Financial Performance 67
  Account Payment Performance 67
  Contractual Arrangements 67
  External Consultancies 68

Appendix 4: Statement of Reconciliation 69

Appendix 5: Acronyms and Abbreviations; Glossary of Terms 70

Appendix 6: Freedom of Information 72

Appendix 7: Departmental Reports and Publications 73

Financial Statements 77



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

3

LETTER OF
TRANSMITTAL

Hon. Lea Stevens MP
Minister for Health
Minister Assisting the Premier in Social Inclusion
Parliament House
North Terrace
Adelaide SA 5000

Hon. Stephanie Key MP
Minister for Social Justice (responsible for Community and Disability Services and the Ageing)
Minister for Housing
Minister for Youth
Minister for the Status of Women
Parliament House
North Terrace
Adelaide SA 5000

Dear Ministers

I am pleased to present to you the Annual Report for the South Australian Department of Human Services for the year ended
30 June 2002.

This Annual Report summarises the activities and achievements over the past 12 months.

It provides a glimpse of just some of the hundreds of activities carried out throughout South Australia in the field of health,
housing and community services. These are highlighted in the Chief Executive s Report.

The mission of the department is to work on your behalf in providing  access to services that enhance and protect the health,
social wellbeing and quality of life of South Australians and to best allocate available resources .

On behalf of all the staff of the department I commend this report to you as a fair and accurate representation of the efforts and
achievements of the past year.

This report complies with the requirements of the Public Sector Management Act 1995, the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987,
and the South Australian Health Commission Act 1976.

JIM BIRCH
Chief Executive

Adelaide, September 2002



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

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For approximately five years, DHS has operated as an integrated portfolio with
responsibility for the funding and delivery of a range of services across the spectrum
of health, disability, aged care, housing, welfare and community development.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE S
REPORT

During much of this period I worked
within the Justice system. Having
returned to human services I plan to
work towards developing better
systems of communication and
collaboration to achieve comprehensive
responses and tangible outcomes for
the community.

Ms Christine Charles was the Chief
Executive of the Department of Human
Services (DHS) and the Hon Dean
Brown MP was the Minister for Human
Services until the change of
government on 6 March 2002. I became
the Chief Executive on 18 March 2002.

Under the new government, DHS
accepted new reporting lines, reporting
to separate Ministers for  health , and
 social justice  and  housing . The new
arrangements provided a prominence
to health as a single issue under a
single Minister. In addition, the
creation of a Housing, and Social
Justice Minister, incorporating Family
and Youth Services, disability services
and the ageing allows detailed
attention to be given to these very
important issues.

Challenges

During 2001 02 the department has
faced a number of challenges including
nurse, pharmacist and anaesthetist
shortages, medical indemnity insurance
and the increased demand for hospital
beds during winter. Challenges with
regard to housing include working with
local housing organisations, services
and the Social Inclusion Unit to reduce
homelessness and to ensure South
Australians have access to appropriate

housing facilities. Challenges in the
social justice area have increased
dramatically with the commitment to
provide services associated with the
Woomera Immigration Reception and
Processing Centre operated by the
Commonwealth. All of these
challenges and the ways in which
they are being met are detailed within
this report.

The shortage of nurses is being
addressed through the development
of a strategic plan and $2.7 million is
being used to establish an
appropriate recruitment strategy.

With regard to medical indemnity, a
new contract was negotiated for
rural practitioners  medical
indemnity from 1 July 2002 and a
medical indemnity round table was
organised to review national reform
proposals and ensure that they
suited the South Australia context.

Each winter a significantly higher
number of patients per day are
treated in our hospitals, mostly
suffering from pneumonia, asthma, flu
and flu complications such as heart
and respiratory disease. This places
the metropolitan public hospitals
under increased pressure.

To manage the activity pressure
on metropolitan hospitals due to
winter demand, DHS has
implemented a Winter Bed Strategy
which incorporates a range of
initiatives including:

  A review of admission and
discharge options by health units,
to enhance options available
through increasing same day

services especially in the medical
admission area

  A request for hospitals to
concentrate on day only elective
procedures and reduce overnight
elective inpatient admissions during
the peak demand periods in winter

  The establishment of Extended
Emergency Care units and / or the
provision of flexible transition
beds (where services cannot be
located near the Emergency
department), in line with the
recommendations of the
Emergency and Trauma Services
Implementation Plan 2000 2011

  Close monitoring and incident
review of twelve hour waits in
Emergency departments and
ambulance diversions

  Continuation of staff flu
vaccination program, with a higher
uptake in 2001 02 than the
previous year.

Homelessness is another challenge
faced by the department during
2001 02. Homelessness is growing in
incidence and complexity in
international, national and local
settings. For some people
homelessness is a one-off crisis event
whilst for an increasing number of
people it is a recurring chronic
problem. Experience of providers of
homelessness services indicates that
more of their client population is
presenting with a complex interplay
of problems such as poverty, drug and
alcohol abuse, psychiatric and other
health problems, unemployment,
family breakdown, family violence,



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

5

and inaccessibility of public and
private housing. To meet the
challenge of homelessness, DHS is
employing a partnership approach
involving service providers, all levels
of government, and organisations and
institutions best placed to identify
individuals at risk. DHS has referred
the five year homelessness plan  A
Place to Live   A Strategic Response
to Homelessness in South Australia 
to the Social Inclusion Unit. DHS and
the Social Inclusion Unit will work
together to establish priorities and
determine the resource implications
for government. DHS is also
addressing the issue of affordable
housing by:

  Ensuring access to public and
community housing for people
with acute housing needs

  Establishing a range of pilot
programs to ensure that public and
community housing tenants with
vulnerable tenancies can be
supported to avoid eviction.

The detention of people within the
Woomera Immigration Reception and
Processing Centre, and the release of
people to South Australia with
temporary visas, has resulted in
increased demands on State services.
A range of activities have been
necessary in order to coordinate and
manage these impacts.

The coordination of an interagency
group with non-government agencies,
community organisations and
government representatives, has
enabled the planning for, and
provision of, basic settlement services
to people released to South Australia
holding temporary visas. In addition,
two agreements have been developed
to ensure that both the State, via the
DHS and the Commonwealth via the
Department of Immigration and
Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs
can monitor, review, and provide care
arrangements for children in
detention situations, as well as
following their release from
detention, within the legal and care
obligations required of both the State
and the Commonwealth.

New Initiatives

DHS is a vast enterprise and
communication is often difficult
because of the breadth, diversity
and complexity of its responsibilities.
The change of government resulted
in a refocusing of the department s
objectives and an emphasis on
streamlining management,
organisational structures and
improving lines of communication.
A number of reviews have commenced
to examine service arrangements.

Management Structures
Review

An intensive review of DHS
management structures was
established in May 2002 with
research being conducted both within
DHS and externally. Lizard Drinking
consultancy conducted the review.
Changes to the departmental
structure following this review are
listed on page 7.

Generational Health
Review

The incoming government recognised
that meaningful improvements to the
provision and delivery of services
across DHS could only be made after
a thorough review   the first such
detailed examination of total services
since the Bright Report of 1973.

Accordingly, the  Generational Health
Review  Committee was launched on
10 May 2002 with John Menadue, AO
as chair. The review will deliver a
plan that provides effective strategies
for health system reform and ensure
that all South Australians enjoy the
best possible health and have access
to high standards of health care. The
committee will report on whole-of-
government planning, service
integration and social inclusion; how
best to develop non-government and
private sector initiatives; workforce
requirements to meet future needs;
and rebuilding connections and
capacity within South Australian
communities to create the climate
and culture that will deliver a
sustainable long-term reform agenda.

This review will make specific
recommendations on:

  Strategies to meet future demands
and to determine the broad
investments required to deliver
health and well being for all
South Australians

  Mechanisms to ensure co-
ordination and integration across
the health system towards
prevention and primary health care,
between community services,
general practice and acute services
and between public health services,
private hospitals and private day
surgeries

  Potential funding and service
delivery models that will enhance
a focus towards prevention and
primary health care delivery,
regional funding mechanisms,
improvements in efficiency and
effectiveness of health care,
including value for money and the
better management of costs.

The review will provide projections
over the next twenty years (2003 23)
with shorter range planning horizons
also being developed.

The review is expected to make its
report to the government on
31 March 2003.

Hospital Infection Review

An independent hospital infection
review is in progress with Dr Peter
Brennan, Director of MA International,
appointed as coordinator. The review
will identify mechanisms to enhance
infection control, reduce cross infection
and improve hygiene standards in public
hospitals.

Stage one of the review is complete.
Stage two will commence in July 2002.
The terms of reference have been set
and include the review of effectiveness
of hospital control of infection units,
infection control policies and the
surveillance of surgical wound rates
including monitoring, feedback
and performance.



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Child Protection Review

In April 2002 a review was established
into Child Protection in South
Australia. Ms Robyn Layton QC is
chairing the review. Its goals include:

1. To deliver a plan to the Minister
for Social Justice that provides
effective strategies to improve the
provision of child protection
services in this State and ensure
better outcomes for children,
young people and their families.
This will be achieved through a
review of DHS policies, practices
and procedures with regard to the
effectiveness of the legislation,
practices and services in
protecting children and young
people. It will also provide advice
on early intervention and
prevention strategies that prevent
abuse of children, ensure
particular attention is given to the
needs of indigenous children and
their families, and will consider
whether current Acts (Children s
Protection Act 1993 and Family
and Community Services Act 1973)
adequately provide for the care
and protection of children and
young people, as well as providing
advice on any legislative reform

2. To examine the adequacy of the
SA criminal law and police
procedures in dealing with
child abuse

3. To provide advice to government
on the strategies and systems
required to achieve a whole of
government coordinated and
integrated response to the
protection of children

4. To provide advice to government
and consider legislation to ensure
organisations protect children
from sexual and physical violence
whilst in their care. Particular
attention will be given to
screening mechanisms for
checking suitability of employees/
volunteers, and on policies,
procedures and training.

Ms Layton will report to the Minister
by the end of 2002.

State Housing Plan

DHS are formulating a State Housing
Plan in consultation with communities,
industry and organisations in both the
private and public arena. The terms of
reference place emphasis on linkages
with other housing and related
initiatives across government and will
facilitate improved planning,
coordinated decision making and
integrated policy making.

The newly formed Housing
Management Council, comprising the
Chairs and General Managers of the
four housing agencies (South
Australian Housing Trust, South
Australian Community Housing
Authority, Aboriginal Housing
Authority and HomeStart Finance) will
auspice the plans development.

The plan will support homeless
initiatives, older persons housing
strategy, mental health projects and
reviews of supported residential
facilities, the Residential Tenancies
Act 1995 and retirement villages, and
funding negotiations with
Commonwealth when the
Commonwealth State Housing
Agreement expires in June 2003.

Involvement of community
organisations is crucial to the plan
development. An extensive
consultation process will include
Round Tables as its central feature
and will link with established
networks, including the Housing
Council (Community Sector). It will
also establish some general forums
and seminars to discuss key issues
and solutions.

Learning Organisation

Creating a learning organisation is a
long-term process. A learning
organisation promotes learning
among its employees and cycles of
learning within its operations so that
functions are dynamic and
progressive. The structure is flexible,
communication is open and decision
making transparent.

To deliver a reliable, relevant and
equitable health system a web of

interests must be heard, interpreted
and balanced in developing a way
forward. Informed decisions require
sufficient time and resources to
consult, argue, discuss and
recommend from amongst the range
of competing demands.

DHS employees are encouraged to
participate in review and
improvement initiatives. A supportive
environment is central, as is a
workforce committed to the
department s goals. This sharing
of learning, information and
knowledge provides a sound
foundation and supports
collaborative working behaviour.

Creating an open environment,
improving communication within, and
across, all sectors, and breaking down
the silo mentality are elementary
steps in transforming the organisation
and improving service provision.

Conclusion

The department s commitment to
developing the information and
technological infrastructure, to
community and consumer participation
and to valuing learning and the
knowledge of stakeholders and its
staff, is being developed to enable a
more consultative and collaborative
approach to decision making.

JIM BIRCH
Chief Executive

Adelaide, September 2002



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

7

PORTFOLIO
RESPONSIBILITIES AND
STRUCTURE
Introduction

For the first seven months of the financial year the Hon Dean Brown MP was the
Minister for Human Services. Following the change of government on 6 March 2002
the Hon Lea Stevens MP became the Minister for Health and Minister Assisting
the Premier in Social Inclusion and the Hon Stephanie Key MP became the
Minister for Housing, Minister for Social Justice, Minister for Youth and
Minister for the Status of Women.

The Hon Lea Stevens MP is
responsible for  health  within DHS.
The Hon Stephanie Key MP is
responsible for  social justice  and
 housing  within DHS.

Following the change of government in
March 2002, Minister Key became
responsible for the Office for the
Status of Women (OSW) and the Office
for Youth. The activities of the OSW
are being reported in the Department
of Transport, Urban Planning and the
Arts Annual Report and the Office for
Youth activities are being reported in
the Department of Education and
Children s Services Annual Report.
Future DHS Annual Reports will
incorporate the business of the OSW
and Office for Youth, those agencies
having been transferred into the DHS
on 1 July 2002.

Statutory Authorities within the Human
Services Portfolio are also required to
produce annual reports. Copies of
these reports are available by
contacting each respective authority.

Functions and objectives

DHS was formed in 1997 integrating
health, housing and community
services to continually improve
service delivery for South Australians.

The department is committed to
working for families and children,
youth, older people, the mentally ill,
those with disabilities, and people
from culturally and linguistically
diverse backgrounds. DHS has a
particular commitment to making a
difference for Aboriginal people and
communities.

DHS delivered services within the
framework of its 1999 02 Strategic
Plan, which includes the following
mission, vision and values statements:

Mission statement

The role of DHS is to support the
Minister for Human Services and the
Minister for Disability Services and
Minister for the Ageing, in providing
access to services that enhance and
protect the health, social well being
and quality of life of South
Australians and to best allocate
available resources.

Vision statement

To significantly enhance the quality of
life and safeguard the health and
wellbeing of South Australians by
leading the development of high
performing integrated health, housing
and community services for

individuals, families and communities.
To achieve this vision DHS will:

  Provide a coordinated response to
human service needs with a focus
on well being, illness prevention,
safety, housing, early intervention
and the provision of quality care

  Foster strong partnerships with
the community and service
providers to promote resilient,
caring and productive communities

  Encourage individuals, families
and communities to take
responsibility for their own health
and wellbeing

  Ensure it takes a holistic
approach based on principles of
justice and equity.

Values statement

DHS had the following values:

Leadership

  To strive for leadership of the
highest quality

  To set clear direction, achieve
results and manage performance.

Excellent service

  To work in partnership with others
to achieve the best possible



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outcomes for individuals, families
and communities

  To be responsive and tolerant

  To show good judgment

Respect

  To treat staff and clients with
courtesy, dignity and respect at all
times

  To value diversity in all its forms
and act in accordance with the
principles of access and equity.

All portfolio plans were aligned to the
DHS Strategic Plan 1999 02.
Initiatives to achieve this included:

  Development of the DHS Portfolio
Planning Framework

  Workshops were conducted,
providing advice and editorial
support, by the Strategic
Development Unit, DHS

  Development of the DHS
Communication Strategy

  Development of the DHS Service
Excellence Framework to
articulate the expectations of the
department in the context of the
DHS Strategic Plan 1999 2002.

Five strategic directions are listed in
the 1999 02 Strategic Plan and were
the foundations for successfully
achieving the key outcomes of the
Human Services Portfolio:

1. Improving services for
better outcomes

2. Increasing the State s capacity to
promote quality of life

3. Redistributing resources in a
changing environment

4. Strengthening a culture of
working together

5. Providing sound management

The initiatives and achievements of
DHS and the South Australian Health
Commission (SAHC) are reported
against these strategic directions.

Development of the 2002 05
Strategic Plan is proceeding and will
take into account feedback from
extensive consultation, the results of
an environmental scan and outcomes
of the Life Journeys Conference.
 Priorities for Action  will be identified
for each financial year. Developing
strategic directions that have direct
practical application will also assist in
building the department s identity and
skills, and create a learning and
collaborative organisation.

Structure

DHS underwent a number of structural
changes during the 2001 02 financial
year. As a result of the change of
government and the appointment of a
new Chief Executive, a management
structure review was undertaken into
the organisational structure of DHS by
Lizard Drinking Consulting Pty. Ltd. Key
reasons for this review were to:

  design a management structure
based upon modern principles of
public administration;

  design natural and supportive
points of reference and contact for
the Ministers;

  ensure balanced workloads for
directors and divisions;

  model more democratic,
collaborative and delegated
management styles; and

  develop a more population-
oriented approach.

This review was completed in June
2002. Following consideration of the
review s recommendations,
departmental divisions were altered
as follows:

  A Metropolitan Health Division
was established comprising the
previous Metropolitan Division
and some initiatives from the
previous Statewide Division;

  Professor Brendon Kearney was
appointed, as Chief Medical
Officer, an Executive Medical
position to the Chief Executive
and Minister;

  A Corporate Resource Division
was established;

  A Housing Management Council
was established;

  The former Country and Disability
Services Division was renamed
Social Justice and Country
Division;

  The Aboriginal Services Division,
and the Strategic Planning and
Policy Division were maintained.

The department s structure provides
an effective administrative means
for the provision of health, housing
and community services. It provides
a comprehensive approach to
service delivery ensuring all inter-
related aspects of healthcare are
working together.



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

9

ORGANISATIONAL CHART
Human Services Portfolio Services prior to 6 March 2002

MINISTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES

MINISTER FOR THE AGEING

MINISTER FOR DISABILITY SERVICES

Hon Dean Brown MP

CHIEF EXECUTIVE

Christine Charles

Service
Providers

HEALTH

HOUSING

COMMUNITY
SERVICES

Executive Director

PLANNING,
POLICY

&amp; CORPORATE

Jim Davidson

Executive Director

COUNTRY &amp;
DISABILITY
SERVICES

Roxanne Ramsey

Executive Director

STATEWIDE

Professor
Brendon Kearney

Executive Director

ABORIGINAL
SERVICES

Brian Dixon

Executive Director

METROPOLITAN

Dr Tom Stubbs

Director

STRATEGIC
PLANNING
&amp; POLICY

Philip Fagan-
Schmidt

A/Chief
Information

Officer

INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT

SERVICES

Ian Halkett

Director

CORPORATE
SERVICES

Rod Bishop

Director

FINANCIAL
SERVICES

Frank Turner

Director

ASSET
SERVICES

Peter Jackson

General
Manager

ABORIGINAL
HOUSING

AUTHORITY

Chris Larkin

General
Manager

SOUTH
AUSTRALIAN

HOUSING
TRUST

Greg Black

General
Manager

SOUTH
AUSTRALIAN
COMMUNITY

HOUSING
AUTHORITY

Brendan Moran

General
Manager

HOMESTART
FINANCE

Gary Storkey



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MINISTER FOR HEALTH

MINISTER ASSISTING
THE PREMIER

IN SOCIAL INCLUSION

Hon Lea Stevens MP

Chief Executive

Jim Birch

ORGANISATIONAL CHART
Human Services Portfolio Services at 30 June 2002

MINISTER FOR
SOCIAL JUSTICE

MINISTER FOR HOUSING

MINISTER FOR YOUTH

MINISTER FOR THE
STATUS OF WOMEN

Hon Stephanie Key MP

Executive Director

OFFICE FOR THE
STATUS OF WOMEN

Carmel O Loughlin

Director

OFFICE FOR YOUTH

Stephen Blight

Service
Providers

HEALTH

HOUSING

COMMUNITY
SERVICES

Executive Director

SOCIAL JUSTICE
&amp; COUNTRY

Roxanne Ramsey

A/Executive
Director

CORPORATE
RESOURCES

Peter Jackson

A/Executive
Director

STRATEGIC
PLANNING &amp;

POLICY

Philip Fagan-
Schmidt

Executive Director

ABORIGINAL
SERVICES

Brian Dixon

Executive Director

CLINICAL
SYSTEMS

Prof. Brendon
Kearney

HOUSING
MANAGEMENT

COUNCIL

General
Manager

ABORIGINAL
HOUSING

AUTHORITY

Chris Larkin

General
Manager

SOUTH
AUSTRALIAN

HOUSING
TRUST

Helen Fulcher
(acting)

General
Manager

SOUTH
AUSTRALIAN
COMMUNITY

HOUSING
AUTHORITY

Brendan Moran

General
Manager

HOMESTART
FINANCE

Gary Storkey

Executive Director

METROPOLITAN
HEALTH

Dr Tom Stubbs



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

11

Acts administered:

HON LEA STEVENS MP
Minister for Health

Blood Contaminants Act 1985

Chiropodists Act 1950

Chiropractors Act 1991

Consent to Medical Treatment and Palliative Care Act 1995

Controlled Substances Act 1984

Dentists Act 1984

Drugs Act 1908

Food Act 1985

Gene Technology Act 2001

Health Professionals (Special Events Exemption) Act 2000

Hospitals Act 1934

Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science Act 1982

Medical Practitioners Act 1983

Mental Health Act 1993

Nurses Act 1999

Occupational Therapists Act 1974

Optometrists Act 1920

Pharmacists Act 1991

Physiotherapists Act 1991

Psychological Practices Act 1973

Public and Environmental Health Act 1987

Public Charities Funds Act 1935

Public Intoxication Act 1984

Reproductive Technology Act 1988

Sexual Re-assignment Act 1988, Part 2 1

South Australian Health Commission Act 1976

Supported Residential Facilities Act 1992

Tobacco Products Regulation Act 1997 (note that on 5/6/97 the Treasurer delegated powers and functions in Part 5
(ss 63 and 65) and Part 7 (s 76 and sub-s 85(1)(a) to the then Minister for Human Services pursuant to s72 of the
Tobacco Products Regulation Act, 1997)

Transplantation and Anatomy Act 1983

MINISTERIAL PORTFOLIO
RESPONSIBILITIES
at 30 June 2002

1. These powers and functions were conferred on the then Minister for Human Services on 17 August 2000 pursuant to the Administrative
Arrangements Act 1994.



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

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HON STEPHANIE KEY MP
Minister for Social Justice
Minister for Housing

Adoption Act 1988

Aged Citizens Clubs (Subsidies) Act 1963

Children s Protection Act 1993

Commonwealth and State Housing Agreement Act 1945

Commonwealth and State Housing Supplemental Agreement Act 1954

Disability Services Act 1993

Family and Community Services Act 1972

Guardianship and Administration Act 1993

Housing Agreement Act 1991

Housing and Urban Development (Administrative Arrangements) Act 1995

Housing Improvement Act 1940

Office for the Ageing Act 1995

Retirement Villages Act 1987

South Australian Co-operative and Community Housing Act 1991

South Australian Housing Trust Act 1995

Other items

Other items that are under the responsibility of the Minister for Social Justice and Housing include the following payments:

  SA Water Corporation for the administration of pensioner remission schemes

  SA Water Corporation for water and wastewater rate concessions for charities, churches and public schools.

Ministerial Portfolio Responsibilities at 30 June 2002 (continued)



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

13

BOARDS AND COMMITTEES
Boards and Committees reporting to the Minister for Health and Minister
for Social Justice, Minister for Housing, Minister for the Status of Women,
Minister for Youth at 30 June 2002:

Minister for Health

  Adelaide Central Community Health Service   Board of Directors

  Anti-Tobacco Ministerial Advisory Taskforce

  Ceduna District Health Services Inc

  Child and Youth Health   Board of Directors

  Chiropody Board of South Australia

  Chiropractors Board of South Australia

  Clinical Dental Technicians Registration Committee

  Commissioners of Charitable Funds

  Controlled Substances Advisory Council

  Dental Board of South Australia

  Dental Professional Conduct Tribunal

  Drug and Alcohol Services Council

  Drug Assessment and Aid Panel

  Eastern Eyre Health and Aged Care Inc

  Eyre Aboriginal Health Advisory Committee

  Eyre Regional Health Service Board

  Flinders Medical Centre   Board of Directors

  Gawler Health Service Inc   Board of Directors

  Hills, Mallee &amp; Southern Regional Health Service Inc Board

  Independent Living Centre of SA Inc

  Intellectual Disability Services Council

  Julia Farr Services Board of Directors

  Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science Council

  Leigh Creek Hospital Board of Directors

  Medical Board

  Medical Practitioners Professional Conduct Tribunal

  Mid North Regional Health Service Inc Board

  Modbury Hospital Board of Directors

  Mount Gambier and Districts Health Service Inc

  Murray Bridge Soldiers  Memorial Hospital Board of Directors

  Noarlunga Health Services Board of Directors

  North Western Adelaide Health Service

  Northern and Far Western Regional Health Service Inc Board

  Northern Metropolitan Community Health Service   Board of Directors



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  Northern Yorke Peninsula Health Service Inc Board

  Nurses Board of South Australia

  Occupational Therapists Registration Board of South Australia

  Optical Dispensers Registration Committee

  Optometrist Board

  Pharmacy Board of South Australia

  Physiotherapists Board of South Australia

  Pika Wiya Health Service

  Port Augusta Hospital &amp; Regional Health Services   Board of Directors

  Port Lincoln Health Services Inc

  Port Pirie Lead Implementation Program

  Port Pirie Regional Health Service Inc Board

  Public and Environmental Health Council

  Repatriation General Hospital Inc   Board of Directors

  Riverland Health Authority Inc Board

  Riverland Regional Health Service Inc Board

  Royal Adelaide Hospital   Board of Directors

  South Australian Council of Reproductive Technology

  South Australian Dental Service Board of Directors

  South Australian Health Commission

  South Australian Psychological Board

  South East Regional Health Service Inc Board

  Southern Domiciliary Care &amp; Rehabilitation Service   Board of Directors

  St Margaret s Hospital Incorporated Board of Directors

  Supported Residential Facilities Advisory Committee

  Wakefield Regional Health Service Inc Board

  Whyalla Hospital and Health Service

  Women s &amp; Children s Hospital Board of Directors

Minister for Housing

  Aboriginal Housing Authority Board of Management

  HomeStart Finance   Asset &amp; Liability Committee

  HomeStart Finance   Audit Committee

  HomeStart Finance   Risk Transfer Committee

  HomeStart Finance Board of Management

  Housing Advisory Council Community Committee

  Public Housing Appeal Panel

  South Australian Community Housing Authority

  South Australian Housing Trust Board of Management

  Urban and Regional Development Advisory Committee

  Westwood Urban Renewal Project Committee

Boards and Committees (continued)



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

15

Minister for Social Justice

  Administrative and Disciplinary Division of the District Court

  Advisory Board on Ageing   Ministerial

  Charitable and Social Welfare Fund Board (Community Benefit SA)

  Child Health Advisory Committee

  Children s Interest Bureau Advisory Committee

  Children s Protection Advisory Panel

  Coordinating Committee for Advisory Bodies for Children

  Disability Advisory Council of South Australia

  Duke of Edinburgh Award State Award Committee

  Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund Committee

  Grants for Seniors Advisory Committee

  Guardianship Board

  Home and Community Care Ministerial Advisory Committee

  Retirement Villages Advisory Committee

Minister for the Status of Women

  Women s Advisory Council   Women in Rural &amp; Regional Areas Standing Committee

  Women s Advisory Council   Women, Work &amp; the Economy Standing Committee

  Women s Advisory Council   Young Women s Standing Committee

Minister for Youth

  Youth Plus



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DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

16

DHS reports against five
Strategic Directions as outlined
in the DHS Strategic Plan
1999 2002.

The following examples
demonstrate achievements
against these directions during
the 2001 02 financial year.

STRATEGIC DIRECTION NUMBER 1

A primary focus of Human Services is the planning and delivery of services that
are driven by the needs of families and individuals. The integrated portfolio, which
incorporates health, housing and community services, offers opportunities to plan
and respond more effectively to complex and diverse community needs.

IMPROVING
SERVICES
FOR
BETTER
OUTCOMES

Service Improvement Plans

The portfolio regularly reported
progress in Service Improvement
Plans for four key areas: ageing
(Moving Ahead   A Strategic Plan for
Older People, p19), disability
(Disability Services Planning and
Funding Framework, p33),
Reconciliation (Reconciliation
business plan, p69) and mental health
(Mental Health Framework p22).
These plans relate to populations or
to specific services that require
responses from health, housing and
community services to improve
services for better outcomes.
They are intended to address
increasing demand or changes in
community needs and expectations.

The department compiles summary
progress reports for each plan at
regular intervals, for consideration by
DHS Executive.

Communications and
Infrastructure

One of the key projects undertaken by
DHS was the implementation of a
discrete data and communications
network called HSNet. This network
will eventually link every DHS service
site. Progress to date includes the
establishment of a core network across
three sites which provides connections
and alternative routing for the eight
major metropolitan hospitals.

 Thin client  network computers (using
networked software) have been

successfully implemented at the Parks
Community Centre.

Facilities Development

Asset Services ensures that adequate
land, buildings and equipment are
available to meet service delivery
requirements. Capital expenditure for
2001 02 was $208.184 million
including expenditure of $122.442
million on Health and FAYS. The
expenditure on housing programs was
$85.742 million.

In 2001 02 the following hospital
upgrades were completed:

  The Flinders Medical Centre 24-bed
Critical Care Medical Unit project
replacing the old 15 bed unit



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  The Noarlunga Health Service
Emergency Department
redevelopment and expansion of
emergency service, medical
records, day surgery and
development of a satellite
dialysis unit

  The obstetric facility at the
Modbury Public Hospital.
Redevelopment upgrade of
theatres, central surgical
sterilisation department and
emergency departments, obstetric
facilities and engineering services
infrastructure is in its final stage.

The following projects were
commenced, or are continuing:

  Stage A Redevelopment of the
Lyell McEwin Health Service has
commenced its major construction
phase and is proceeding well.
The redevelopment provides new
emergency, imaging, Intensive
Care Unit, High Dependency Unit,
Operating Theatres, Central
Surgical Sterilisation Department,
Wards, Women s Health Centre,

administration and education
accommodation to meet growing
needs of the northern
metropolitan area.

  The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
Stage 1 Redevelopment has
commenced major construction to
provide 200 new inpatient beds to
replace current poor facilities

  Stage 2/3A Royal Adelaide
Hospital Redevelopment has
continued into its first major
construction phase to upgrade of
critical care, emergency, imaging,
theatres, and associated clinical
facilities.

Family and Youth Services projects
during 2001 02 included relocation of
the Adoptions Unit, maintenance at
Magill Training Centre and minor
works to district offices.

The department is planning to
upgrade mental health facilities to:

  Provide 40 adult acute mental
health beds at Flinders Medical

Centre. The concept is being
developed

  Provide 30 adult aged mental health
beds at Repatriation General
Hospital. The concept is being
developed.

During 2001 02 a number of country
hospital projects were undertaken:

  Stage 1 redevelopment of acute and
diagnostic facilities of the Murray
Bridge Hospital design commenced,
for the extension of day surgery,
construction of new acute inpatient
accommodation and the extension
of the community health facility

  The Clare Hospital redevelopment is
being designed to provide a new 12
bed acute ward, minor upgrade to
the existing operating theatre and
relocating the existing casualty
department

  The redevelopment of the
operating theatre and birthing unit
at the Renmark Hospital has been
designed.

The following country aged care
projects were completed in 2001 02:

  The upgrade of Kingston Hospital
providing five aged care beds to
meet current Commonwealth Aged
Care standards and related
upgrade works

  The upgrade of Penola Hospital
providing three aged care beds to
meet current Commonwealth Aged
Care standards and related
upgrade works.

Additional aged care beds are being
made available to meet Commonwealth
Aged Care standards. The following
country aged care projects were
undertaken:

  Upgrade of Tumby Bay Hospital to
provide for twelve long stay aged
care beds, and an upgrade of
electrical services, the nurse call
system, and fire safety systems

  The redevelopment of Cummins
Hospital to provide for eight long
stay aged care beds, and upgrade of
electrical services, the nurse call
system, and fire safety systems



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

18

  The redevelopment of Laura
Hospital providing thirteen long
stay aged care beds, and an
upgrade of electrical services, the
nurse call system, and fire safety
systems

  The upgrade of Crystal Brook
Hospital providing sixteen long stay
aged care beds, and an upgrade of
electrical services, the nurse call
system, and fire safety systems

  The redevelopment of Quorn
Hospital providing nine long stay
aged care beds and, an upgrade of
electrical services, the nurse call
system, and fire safety systems

  The redevelopment of thirty two
beds in Hammill House, Port Pirie
Hospital. Planning was being
completed prior to the
appointment of an architect

  The upgrade of Bordertown
Hospital providing nine aged care
beds and related upgrade works

  The upgrade of Naracoorte
Hospital providing four aged care
beds and related upgrade works.

Government Technology
Awards

DHS  Information Management
Services was awarded two national
Government Information Technology
awards in 2002 for provision of
excellent solutions to the department.
A Gold Award commemorated the
collaboration and integration aspects
of the Parks Community Centre project.
A Silver Award recognised the creation
and delivery of the Immunisation
Calculator, aimed at providing
clinicians and parents with a means to
accurately determine the remaining
immunisation schedule for individual
children based on vaccination doses
already administered.

Risk Management

Risk management is a departmental
priority. DHS is focussing on
embedding risk management
awareness and practices into existing
organisational structures.

Achievements of Risk Management
Services in 2001 02 included:

  Conducting a 2001 Risk
Management Seminar to launch
Better Practice Guides

  Producing and distributing a booklet
throughout the Portfolio entitled  Risk
Management System
Implementation Strategies  to
provide practical advice on how to
implement the standards contained
in the DHS Risk Management Better
Practice Guide

  Formalising divisional risk reporting
to the DHS Risk Management
Committee, and compiling a DHS
Risk Profile

  Integrating Risk Management with
the Service Excellence Framework

  developing a long-term workers
compensation claims strategy to
provide advice to organisations on
how to manage claims that have the
potential to resolve slowly and on
how to return workers injured
employees to the workplace.

Clinical Service Planning
Studies Overview

Comprehensive integrated planning
studies have been developed to meet
the challenges of increasing technology,
ageing population, increased demand
on services and higher costs.

Implementation plans have been
launched and strategies are being
implemented for Healthy Start
(obstetrics gynaecology and neo-natal),
renal and urology services, and
emergency and trauma services.
Implementation plans have been
developed for cancer, cardiac, burns
and intensive care services.
A rehabilitation service review has
 also been completed.

Human Services Research
and Innovation Program

The Human Services Research and
Innovation Program was implemented
in 2001 02 to promote quality priority
driven research and innovative projects
with an emphasis on evaluation.
18 projects were approved that
address issues such as homelessness,
young people, chronic disease, and
Aboriginal health and wellbeing

Men s Health Program

During 2001 02 the Men s Health
Program has been extremely active in
developing links with Aboriginal
Regional Men s Groups across the
State. Key achievements include:

  Development of an Aboriginal
Men s Health Newsletter to
promote the work being done by
Aboriginal men s groups within
South Australia

  Developing a holistic State
Aboriginal Men s Issues Strategy,
a priority action within the Men s
Health Program

  Finalising the report from  Korni
Yunnan  (A State-wide Aboriginal
Men s Health Issues Gathering
held in October 2001).

Mothercarer Program

The Mothercarer program supports
women who have given birth at the
Lyell McEwin Health Service and their
families by providing home duties and
support for a six-day period following
early discharge from hospital, under
the supervision of a midwife.

The program employs young women
from the local community who have
successfully undergone a six month
mothercarer course in collaboration
with the University of South Australia.

Right: Doug Gerrie, DHS,
presenting a set of
prints to Port Pirie
Regional Health
Service, Manager,
Risk Management
Services,
Dean Ryder in
recognition of
workplace safety
initiatives that
reduced workers
compensation
claims by more
than 60%

Far right: Young women are
Melissa Foord and
Many Mashado

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19

The service is proving popular with
young mothers. Two Aboriginal
mothercarers are providing a valuable
service to Aboriginal mothers and
their families.

An independent evaluation of the
program is being conducted by the
Flinders University of South Australia.

Enfield Early Learning
Service

DHS and the Department of
Education, Training and Employment
received Stronger Families and
Communities funds from the
Commonwealth Department of Family
and Community Services to employ a
full time coordinator worker for the
development of a facility at the
Enfield Primary School site for a range
of community based parenting
activities. Other partners include the
Child and Youth Health Service and
other local primary schools.

Alternative Care

DHS works with funded agencies,
foster carers, peak advocacy bodies
and other government organisations
to provide alternative care for children
and young people whose parents or
guardians cannot maintain their
safety and wellbeing.

Significant progress has been made
towards the development of a more
diverse range of care options.
Achievements in 2001 02 included:

  Linkages between government,
non-government organisations and
peak agencies were strengthened
and improved to promote
collaboration in providing better
outcomes for children, young
people and their families

  The  Review of Alternative Care in
South Australia  was completed
after extensive consultation and
calls for submissions. The final
Report and Recommendations
were endorsed by the Minister for
Social Justice in May 2002

  The Alternative Care Unit was
formed (July 2001) to improve
administration, management and

delivery of the DHS Alternative
Care Program.

Young Children at The
Parks Community Centre

In response to a growing number of
very young, unsupervised children
wandering around the Parks
Community Centre, DHS is supporting
a number of initiatives to address
these children s needs. Initiatives
include school holiday activity
programs, breakfast club, connecting
to the parents of the children,
increasing security on the premises
and employing some specific
Aboriginal child and youth workers.
As a result behaviour has improved
and community development activity
with the families is progressing.

Children and Families
Precinct at Gilles Plains

DHS negotiated with the Department
of Education, Training and
Employment to access a building on
the Gilles Plains Primary School site
to accommodate an Aboriginal Family
Centre as part of developing a joint
community school precinct.

Agenda for Children in the
Northern Metropolitan Area

Agenda for Children in the Northern
Metropolitan Area is a 3-5 year plan
aimed at improving service delivery,
integration and coordination to
achieve better health and wellbeing
outcomes. The main thrust of the
Agenda for Children has been the
development of a Children s Services
Planning Framework that identifies
the following five major goals to
improve children s health in the north:

  Improving the mental health and
well being of children

  Improving the environment in
which children live

  Improving the health and well
being of Aboriginal children

  Providing more accessible and
appropriate services for children

  Ensuring effective partnerships
exist within the human services

system and with other public and
community-based agencies that
impact on the health and well
being of children.

The agenda is supported by a range
of key service provider agencies in
the north.

A major evaluation of the agenda s
impact with respect to outcomes for
children is being undertaken.

YouthWeb

During 2001 02 YouthWeb, a
collaborative entry and case
management process for young
people at risk in the community, was
expanded. In the outer Southern
Metropolitan Area, YouthWeb was
trialed among twenty youth agencies
across government, local councils and
non-government sectors.

In 2001 02 participating young
people were provided with
coordinated and integrated service
responses which:

  Encouraged and assisted them to
remain connected in the education
system, including participating in
tertiary education programs

  Increased their labour
participation rates and income
security as a result of meaningful
educational and employment
opportunities

  Improved their personal health and
well being

  Assisted them in having a clearer
understanding of the consequences
of their at risk behaviour and
actions, including the impact of
substance abuse upon their lives.

Moving Ahead

 Moving Ahead   A Strategic Plan for
Human Services for Older People in
South Australia 1999 2004  is in its
fourth year of implementation. It aims
to improve the planning and delivery
of health and community services for
older people, with a particular focus
on indigenous people and people from
culturally and linguistically diverse
backgrounds.



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

20

 Moving Ahead  proposes a better
integration of health, housing and
community services with an emphasis
on prevention, early intervention,
rehabilitation and the coordination of
acute care, residential care and
community services.

The 2001 02 State Budget included
$1 million funding to progressively
implement Moving Ahead.

Moving Ahead has given focus to a
range of initiatives resulting in an
increased investment in prevention
and early intervention and transition
services. Outcomes include:

  A range of initiatives that prevent
illness and improve health and
well being

  Progressing the establishment of a
single Metropolitan Domiciliary
Care Service

  Falls prevention initiatives such
as the commencement of the
Taking Steps program and the
development of a Fall Prevention
Action Plan

  The second round Northern
Venture Coordinated Care Trials

  Commencement of the joint
Commonwealth/State Home
Rehabilitation and Support Program.

Strategic Directions for
Older People from Culturally
and Linguistically Diverse
(CALD) Backgrounds

DHS will be releasing the report
 Strategic Directions for Older People
from Culturally and Linguistically
Diverse Backgrounds  in August 2002.
The report provides direction for the
provision of human services to this
group over the next three years. Its aim
is to improve health and wellbeing
outcomes for CALD older persons by
developing culturally appropriate
human services for their communities.

The report follows an extensive
consultation process with
stakeholders, including service
providers, community groups and key
organisations.

The document commits the
department to ongoing collaboration
with all levels of government engaged
in aged care service provision, the
non-government and private sectors
and the ethnic communities in the
planning and implementation of six
strategic directions:

  Promote wellbeing and health

  Develop and build culturally
appropriate human services

  Improve equity of resource
allocation

  Provide equitable access to
information

  Promote partnerships and build the
capacity of ethnic communities

  Improve management for quality
performance.

Feedback on the report will be sought
from stakeholders on the desired
actions that will need to happen to
ensure effective implementation of
the strategic directions highlighted by
the report.

Integrated Community
Planning in Aboriginal
Communities

Integrated Community Planning
establishes a framework for
integrated service delivery.
Priorities are agreed upon and
partnerships strengthened at the
local level to ensure human service
needs of country communities are
met in a flexible, creative and
meaningful manner.

Listening to the Aboriginal
community, and responding to matters
raised, is fundamental. Integrated
service development initiatives in
Ceduna, Coober Pedy, Whyalla and
Mount Gambier, and work being
undertaken with Aboriginal Health
Advisory Councils, demonstrates the
importance of this approach.

Homemaker/Family Support
and Youth Programs

DHS  Aboriginal Services Division,
through locally based Community
Development Workers, is developing
community based Homemaker

programs in six communities.
Communities being considered for
this program include Ceduna, Coober
Pedy, Mount Gambier, Point Pearce,
Riverland, Whyalla, and Yalata,.
These programs, funded by Parenting
SA, aim to assist parents with
budgeting skills, parenting skills,
house management and hygiene.

The division is also in the process of
locating youth workers in all
Aboriginal communities to address
the very real need for youth activities.
These workers will complement other
community based programs, such as
Homemaker and Child Youth Health.

Aboriginal Health
Advancement in the
Northern Metropolitan Area

During 2001 02 DHS provided
resources to support the establishment
of an Aboriginal Primary Health Care
Advancement Program in the northern
metropolitan area. A project officer
worked in collaboration with
Nunkawarrin Yunti, Muna Paiendi, the
Aboriginal Health Team of Northern
Metropolitan Community Health
Service and the Aboriginal Sobriety
Group, with funding from the
Commonwealth Department of Health
and Ageing, to develop a
comprehensive Aboriginal Primary
Health Care Plan for the north. This
was completed with strong community
participation and the collaboration of a
range of Aboriginal services and
community members.

Aboriginal Kinship Program

The Aboriginal Kinship Program
commenced implementation in
November 2001 and will take
approximately four years to fully
implement. 12 DHS and non-
government agencies are involved
and have agreed on using an
integrated holistic approach.

The Aboriginal Kinship Program is
working with clients to develop
systematic approaches to services.
The program is unique in the way that
it focuses on the whole family in the
fight against drug abuse. A joint
strategic plan is being developed

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between DHS and non-government
agencies providing services to clients
of this program.

Safety and Quality in
Public Hospitals

The SA Hospitals Safety and Quality
Council (HSQC) is responsible for the
development and monitoring of a
statewide strategy to support
continuous quality improvement in
patient care. In accordance with the
Australian Health Care Agreements,
the Quality Improvement and
Enhancement Plan (Quality Strategic
Plan) was reviewed in December 2001
and reported to the Australian Council
for Safety and Quality in Health Care
in the form of a mid term review in
January 2002. The review provided a
project status report and specifically
highlighted those areas where South
Australia is leading national work:

  Implementation of Open
Architecture and Clinical
Information System (OACIS)

  Metropolitan Clinical Services
Planning Study

  State-wide patient evaluation of
hospital services   pilot study

  Incident monitoring   Australian
Incident Monitoring System and
the evaluation of an Incident
Reporting Intervention to improve
hospital systems.

The SA HSQC has also supported the
establishment of roundtables and
working groups to support consumer
participation, falls prevention and harm
minimisation, and pressure ulcers.

Other key areas of work include:

  Anticoagulation Therapy Project

  Emergency department
collaborative

  Blood Safe   incorporating clinical
appropriateness, haemovigilence
and inventory management

  Development of a DHS safety and
quality website

  Clinical information sessions and
workshops  Human Factors and
Errors in Health 

Extending Information
to Clinicians

The Open Architecture and Clinical
Information Systems (OACIS)
programme provides information to
clinicians about patients and their
treatments at the point of care. This is
provided through the OACIS software.
The project has now been extended
from the original renal units at four
sites to a total of 62 clinical units
across seven metropolitan sites. The
numbers of users able to access the
OACIS Clinical Display has increased
from 250 to approximately 2 700.

The OACIS Clinical Order Management
module, which allows for on-line
ordering of 4   5 000 clinical services,
is in its final stages of planning and
preparation prior to the
commencement of the pilot
implementation. These services are
from areas including laboratory,
imaging, pharmacy, respiratory,
gastroenterology, and cardiology.

Hospital at Home

Hospital at Home (H@H) Programs are
provided by most of the major
metropolitan health services. H@H is
an early discharge program which
assists in reducing pressure on
inpatient beds by facilitating and
maximising community based patient
care options. H@H is a substitute for
acute inpatient care. Administration of
chemotherapy, transfusions of blood
products, wound care and long term
administration of antibiotics,
therapeutic or prophylactic substances
are common types of H@H activity.

H@H separations increased by 64%
from 1998 99 to 2000 01. This
increase has occurred as participating
hospitals have refined their programs,

and as more areas within the hospitals
have become aware of the service.

The Repatriation General Hospital has a
Rehabilitation at Home Program for
patients suffering from strokes, and
following some orthopaedic surgery.
The Women s and Children s Hospital
program supports children suffering
from cystic fibrosis and is extending into
providing support for other children with
longer term needs, such as long term
antibiotics therapy post neurosurgery.

Hospital Avoidance Program

The Hospital Avoidance Program
responds to the growing demand for
services that transcend the traditional
inpatient/residential care options by
providing an alternative to referring
elderly people to an emergency
department of an acute hospital.
It provides a rapid response solution
for many clients who are unable to
manage short term health crises
without the need for admission to
hospital.

DHS funds three services within the
program, two GP Homelink programs
(one in the North and one in the South),
and an Emergency to Home Outreach
Service (ETHOS) managed by Flinders
Medical Centre.

Emergency and Trauma

The Emergency Department Clinical
Reference Group, established in
2000 01, is working to identify
priorities for implementation from the
Emergency and Trauma Services
Implementation Plan 2000 2011.
Considerable work has also been
undertaken to determine standard
performance indicators, which will be
collected by metropolitan hospitals with
emergency departments from July 2002.

South Australian Trauma
Clinical Advisory Committee

An interim South Australian Trauma
Clinical Advisory Committee (SATCAC)
has continued to meet monthly
pending the outcome of the intensive
care and retrieval services review. The
review was undertaken as part of the
Metropolitan Clinical Services

Left: L to R. Zell Dodd,
Principal Project
Officer, AKP,
Mary Shadford,
Aboriginal
Women s Families,
&amp; Youth Advisor,
State Dept of
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DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

22

Planning Review and is being
considered in the context of the
Generational Health Review.

An implementation plan is currently
being developed. It will provide a
framework for achieving optimal
outcomes for South Australians
requiring intensive care and/or
retrieval services and their families.

Shared Services
Partnership

In 2001 02 DHS Financial Services
introduced a pilot shared services
partnership to Northern Metropolitan
Community Health Services (NMCHS).
The project aims to provide better
outcomes for clients of NMCHS
through savings to the agency arising
from Financial Services providing
financial and administrative services.

Mental Health Framework

During 2001 02 there were a
number of achievements against the
Mental Health Framework. Progress
was made against all of the
Departmental strategic directions
and thus achievements have been
included under  mental health 
throughout this document.

Mental Health

Achievements in mental health to
improve services include:

  Mental Health Emergency Demand
Management   an articulated
vision for emergency demand
management as a comprehensive,
mainstream and integrated
component of the health system
has been completed

  Implementation of new Emergency
Mental Health Demand strategies
which combine improved practice,
increased training and skill
development across the whole
health system, and more
consistent policies and procedures

  Completion of the translation of
National Standards for Mental
Health Services into the DHS
Service Excellence Framework.

  Development and delivery of three
programs for the Emergency
Mental Health/ Alcohol and Drug
Training Program (FMC/ Flinders
University of South Australia in
collaboration with the Mental
Health Unit).

Identifying Mental Health
Issues Co-existing with
Physical Illness

A continuing study involving the
Health Outcomes Unit, hospitals and
primary practitioners, and over 1400
patients admitted to Adelaide s public
hospitals, is seeking to better
understand and improve the mental
health of individuals facing physical
illnesses, using cardiac conditions
and depression as an example.

Southern Early Intervention
Services

Recurrent funding of $150 000 was
allocated to establish additional
occupational therapy services at
Noarlunga Community Health
Services, enabling provision of these
early intervention services across the
entire Onkaparinga Council Area.

Drug Strategy and
Programs

DHS established a Drug Strategy &amp;
Programs Branch to provide a central
point of contact for all DHS activities
around drug policy development,
program funding, implementation
and review.

Drug Summit

The SA Drug Summit, held in June
2002, provided important information
on the causes of, and identifying
factors surrounding, drug use. This
information will allow the government
to review current services aimed at
preventing drug use. The role of DHS
included the provision of
representation on the organising
committee, and also the attendance
of delegates with appropriate
expertise in the areas of alcohol and
drug misuse and support services.
Additional departmental assistance
was provided in the form of speakers,

facilitators and support staff for the
duration of the Drug Summit.

Police Drug Diversion
Initiative

This initiative, which commenced in
September 2001, aims to divert high-
risk youth and adults from the criminal
justice system into drug assessment,
counselling and treatment services.
To 30 June 2002, over 1000 individuals
had been diverted.

Drug Court Trial

The Drug Court Trial was established
during 2001 02. It directs offenders
who present with drug-related
problems into treatment and support
programs as an alternative to
imprisonment. The Justice
Department is the lead portfolio for
the trial. DHS has the key
responsibility for the development
and oversight, in co-operation with
both government and non-government
organisations, of the provision of drug
assessment and treatment services.

Public Housing

The South Australian Housing Trust
(SAHT) provides housing and related
services to low income and special
needs households. At 30 June 2002,
47 141 households resided in public
housing. Throughout 2001 02, 9 478
customers applied for public housing
and 4 423 properties were allocated
to new tenants. At 30 June 2002, the
SAHT had a total of 49 543 rental
properties, compared with 51 251
rental properties at 30 June 2001.
Declines in stock holdings have
occurred as a result of:

  An increased transfer of SAHT
properties to capital programs.

Right: Example of a Trust
double unit located
in the Marion
SAHT region

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This enables the renovation of
ageing stock as well as facilitating
high levels of urban regeneration
and the Better Neighbourhoods
stock replacement program

  Transfer of properties to the South
Australian Community Housing
Authority and the Aboriginal
Housing Authority

  Decreased opportunities to
replace assets through purchase
on the open market, given a strong
sales environment

  Provision of home ownership
opportunities to SAHT tenants and
the wider community.

The SAHT also provides information
and financial assistance for low
income and special needs customers
to enter the private rental market. As
at 30 June 2002 SAHT had provided
22 357 financial assistance services
to assist people to access or maintain
private rental accommodation.

The SAHT, for the fourth consecutive
year, achieved the highest customer
satisfaction rating of all states and
territories in the National Social
Housing Survey, although this year
South Australia tied with Queensland.
The Productivity Commission also
highlighted the fact that SAHT has
the lowest net and gross costs of all
public housing providers in Australia.

HomeStart Finance

HomeStart Finance provides support
to low-income households to become
independent and stable through
home ownership.

In 2001 02 HomeStart Finance:

  Settled over 2 650 loans enabling
many low-income South
Australians to access and maintain
affordable home ownership

  Assisted many low income first
homebuyers into home ownership,
with the government s First Home
Owner Grant, established
30 June 2000, being accepted
towards deposit and fees

  Commenced a pilot program with
a Carers Home Maintenance Loan
to assist people to modify their

homes to improve the quality of
life for a carer or dependent

  Established an internal unit for the
management and delivery of
 Seniors and Carers  loans

  Further reviewed regional and
country SA lending deposit
requirements in order to provide
greater access to home
ownership opportunities to
all South Australians.

It is estimated that approximately
95% of HomeStart customers settling
loans in 2001 02 would have been
ineligible for a bank loan at the time
of application.

Aboriginal Housing
Authority

The Aboriginal Housing Authority
(AHA) provides rural and remote
housing for Aboriginal clients, and
administers the Aboriginal Housing
Rental Program.

The AHA has identified several key
needs groups across the State, and
has instigated housing projects to
address their needs.

Key projects being negotiated
included:

  Crisis accommodation for single
parent families within the inner city

  Aboriginal youth housing facility
for housing students from regional
centres for medical, educational
and associated purposes

  Step-down facility to be used for
people travelling from remote
areas for medical assistance.

Key actions during 2001 02 included:

  Commencement of stage 1 of the
construction of 43 houses in remote
areas. Tenders for 28 houses have
been developed and called, and the
assessment process was finalised
in January 2002

  Statewide consultations are being
undertaken with Aboriginal
communities throughout the State
to determine the future role of
Housing Management Committees
in South Australia.

The AHA has established an outreach
service at Westcare in Wright Street,
Adelaide. Approximately 150 people
use Westcare services on a daily
basis, approximately 50% of whom
are Aboriginal. Two AHA Aboriginal
staff members provide housing
information, referral and advocacy to
Aboriginal people one morning a
week. In consultation with Aboriginal
Hostels Ltd, the AHA also provides a
list of hostel beds available on that
day to increase housing options
available to customers.

Aboriginal home ownership continues
to increase through the AHA and
HomeStart Finance pilot project.
During 2001 02 the AHA received
191 enquiries regarding the AHA
Home Ownership Program, with 12
properties having been sold to sitting
tenants   seven in the metropolitan
area and five in the country.

The AHA also provided financial
assistance for low income and special
needs customers to enter the private
rental market. Under its Private Rental
Accommodation Scheme the AHA
assisted 175 customers, both
Indigenous and non-Indigenous, in
accessing or maintaining private
rental accommodation.

South Australian
Community Housing
Authority

In 2001 02 the South Australian
Community Housing Authority (SACHA)
completed 472 properties, eighty more
than the previous record in 2000 01.
This brought the number of properties
under management by community
housing organisations (CHOs) for
2001 02 to 3 877, an increase of
14.9% on the 2000 01 total.

SACHA completed 24 properties as
part of the Group Self Build
program, in which groups of up to
12 households work with an
experienced building supervisor to
construct their own homes.

In addition, 26 properties were built in
joint ventures with other organisations,
including CHOs, local government and
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DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

24

Supported Accommodation

DHS  Supported Housing Unit and
Family and Youth Services (FAYS)
have jointly developed a Supported
Housing Demonstration Project to
provide a continuum of integrated
supported housing, family and youth
services and case management
responses for young people aged
15-18 years who:

  Are under the guardianship of the
Minister or another statutory order

  Are at risk of homelessness

  Demonstrate early evidence of
mental illness and require support
to live independently in the
community.

Planning for the project is complete.

During 2001 02 FAYS and the SAHT
trialed a number of initiatives aimed
at supporting people to avoid eviction
due to a failure to pay SAHT rent and
debt. One example is the Financial
Management Project undertaken at
seven different locations. This project
targets SAHT/FAYS clients where
child protection, poverty and risk of
homelessness are key factors.
A group work approach is used to
address the above issues, including
customer debt and enhancement of
participants social education and
networks, with the aim of stabilising
tenancies. Benefits to the client for
attendance include halting of the
eviction process, the ability to have
part of their SAHT debt written off,
and increased opportunities to
improve life skills and social skills
and develop community links.

Stable Accommodation for
People with Complex
Needs Project

This project aims to improve quality of
life through better community-based
accommodation and support
outcomes for people with complex
needs, including mental illness and
psychiatric disability.

DHS is facilitating the implementation
of nine demonstration projects
allowing people who require support
to live independently in metropolitan

and country SA. These projects are at
various locations around Adelaide, as
well as the South-East, Whyalla,
Victor Harbor, and the Riverland.

An evaluation of the Salisbury project
has indicated its effectiveness in
achieving improved quality of life for
participants, while reducing demand
for acute in-patient services.

Country Health Services

The Social Justice and Country
Division, DHS funds:

  Sixty-three country health services
comprising hospitals and Multi
Purpose Services. At 30 June
2002, five have been
implemented, seven were in the
planning phase and five potential
sites had been identified

  Seven Regional Health Services
and the Gawler Health Service

  A range of other health services
through service agreements.

Safety and Quality in
Country Health Services

The Country Clinical Sub-Committee
of the South Australian Hospitals
Safety &amp; Quality Council has
expanded the scope of its agenda to
include past projects such as falls
prevention in hospitals (a statewide
initiative directed at falls
minimisation and the implementation
of best practice guidelines), pressure
ulcers and reportable events.

The sub-committee has also extended
its commitment to the Blood Safe
project, which is the implementation
into country health units of the
National Health and Medical
Research Council Guidelines for Safe
Practice &amp; Administration of Blood &amp;
Blood Products. The Anticoagulation
Therapy Project has surveyed country
health units regarding current
practices and will use information
collected to develop an appropriate
protocol. A working group has been
formed to develop a model that
ensures consumer and community
participation in both local and state
level services.

The Emergency Department
Collaborative and Open Disclosure
projects are other areas being
supported by the sub-committee.
The sub-committee focussed on the
development of partnerships within
these areas acknowledging the
fundamental right for people to be
included in areas of decision making
that affect them.

Regional Information
Management

Following the successful
implementation of  thin client 
network computers at the Parks
Community Centre, the Department
continued the rollout of network
computers to its other community
health agencies. The aim was to
implement an infrastructure to
support primary care agencies by
providing access to standard
computer based tools and
applications, and a technology for
common and shared client and service
planning applications.

This project, The Regional Health
Client Management System Project,
involved the deployment of a
common client management system,
data standards and associated work
processes for community health,
domiciliary care, aged care,
community mental health, and
palliative care services providers to
fifty-eight sites in the seven country
health regions. This project formed a
key platform in the primary,
preventive and collaborative health
care strategy. Over 800 staff across
seventy sites in the community
health sector were trained and are
now able to access customer service
and desktop productivity tools such
as email.

In June 2002, DHS was in the final
stages of the implementation of the
common Patient Administration and
Financial system within the large
country hospitals, thus standardising
these systems across all
departmental country hospitals.

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Regional Health Services
and Multi Purpose Services
(Commonwealth Rural
Health Services Program)

The Regional Health Services
Program, developed throughout rural
South Australia in partnership with
the Commonwealth Department of
Health and Ageing, aims to build the
capacity of rural and remote areas to
better meet the changing needs of
their population by increasing access
to flexible health, aged care and
community services.

Regional Health Services have been
developed in Eyre, Wakefield, Mid-
North and Hills Mallee Southern
regions. These areas have an
increased primary health care focus
with improved access to community
care, allied health and health
promotion services.

Multi-purpose services have been
developed in Eyre and Hills Mallee
Southern regions. The pooling of State
and Commonwealth funds enables an
incorporated community body to plan
and deliver flexible, innovative
community and residential aged care
services in line with detailed local
health and aged care plans.

Equity Responsiveness
Access Project

The Equity Responsiveness Access
(ERA) Project, initiated by the Social
Justice and Country Division, is a two
year pilot running until October 2003
with funding from Home and
Community Care. The project involves
government and non-government
providers and focusses on
implementing recommendations from
the Review of Country Domiciliary
Care Services, (December 2000).

The ERA Project aims to promote
equity, responsiveness and access in
the Wakefield, Mid North and Gawler
areas. Improved service responses
will be achieved through streamlined
entry, screening and assessment and
service coordination processes for
people requiring community-based
health and home care services.

The project s service provision model
proposes a common entry point into
the system (one option being a toll free
telephone number) and a common
screening process identifying whether
specialist or comprehensive
assessment is required and
establishing whether further
assessment is appropriate and
relevant. New screening arrangements
are being trialed. Community health
services are the first agencies to be
involved in the pilot and are
establishing new arrangements for
coordinating assessment.

Medical Practice
Establishment

A medical practice has been
established to provide a
continuation of emergency services
to the Coober Pedy Hospital and
Health Service to meet the specific
needs of Aboriginal people.

The Regional Health
Services Enhanced Primary
Health Care Programs at
Coober Pedy

A range of primary health care
initiatives have been identified for
development within the Regional
Health Services at Coober Pedy.
These initiatives will build on existing
resources and include:

  Family Health/Wellbeing Program

  Mental Health/Wellbeing Program

  Child Health Program

  Primary Health Care/Health
Promotion Program

  Youth Health Program

  Ngankari Program

  Aboriginal Liaison Health
Worker Program

  Executive Support Program.

The Coober Pedy Regional
Health Service Program

DHS has commenced construction of
an aged care facility which is
expected to be completed by
December 2002. The residential
component has nine high care beds
and seven low care beds. Six high
care beds are for Aboriginal people
and the other three high care beds are
for the wider community. The six high
care beds will be under joint
management of the Coober Pedy
Hospital and Health Service and the
Umoona Aged Care Aboriginal
Corporation. The facility is oriented
towards Aboriginal people but non-
Aboriginal people will also be
welcome. The seven low care beds
are located in an adjacent and
connected facility.

Country Women s Health &amp;
Well Being

The Country Women s Health
Services, funded from the Public
Health Outcomes Funding Agreement
under a State/Commonwealth shared
agreement until June 2004, provide a
range of activities for rural and
remote women from twenty sites
across the seven health regions.
These activities were initiated to
provide a greater access to services,
thereby redressing the health and
wellbeing inequalities experienced by
regional, rural and remote women.

Key result areas are identified in the
Rural Regional Women s Health &amp;
Well Being Plans, 1999 2003 and
include violence against women,
emotional and mental wellbeing, and
sexual and reproductive health.
Population groups in most need
include Aboriginal women, women
from culturally and linguistically
diverse backgrounds, young women,
elderly women and women with high
levels of responsibility.



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STRATEGIC DIRECTION NUMBER 2

The Human Services portfolio promotes and creates a healthy, caring, safe and
tolerant community consistent with the government s objective of enhancing the
quality of life for South Australians.

INCREASING
THE STATE S
CAPACITY
TO PROMOTE
QUALITY OF LIFE

Community Capacity
Building Initiatives

During 2001 02 a number of
community capacity building
initiatives took place including:

  Supporting the establishment of
the Parks IT Access Group Inc. as a
community driven organisation
dedicated to teaching local mature
aged residents how to use
computers and the Internet

  Establishing a Community Asset
Mapping Project at the Parks in
conjunction with the Department
of Education Training and
Employment and Gepps Cross
Girls High School

  Establishing and supporting a
range of community based

initiatives in Kilburn, Blair Athol
including a Young People
Leadership and Community
Initiatives Project called THRIVE
(Training, Health, Recreation,
Information, Voice and Enjoyment)

  Establishing a Young Carers
Accreditation Training and Home
Based Business Training Program,
in conjunction with Regency
Technical and Further Education
College, which provides
recognition and training
qualifications for young people
who are performing these tasks in
their homes.

Healthy Start

A Healthy Start Clinical Reference
Group and three work groups are

initiating work in three priority areas
arising from The Healthy Start
Implementation Plan 2000 2011
for the provision of obstetric,
neo-natal and gynaecology services
in South Australia:

  The  Models of Care  work group
has developed a state wide model
for GP obstetric shared care which
includes uniform protocols for
antenatal visits. The model is
being considered for endorsement.
The work group is also developing
 Guiding Principles for Midwifery-
led Care  that will underpin
midwifery practice in South
Australia regardless of the model
of midwifery care provided

  The  Neonatology/Perinatal  work
group is establishing a Central



27

ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

Perinatal Advisory Service for the
provision of advice to rural and
metropolitan practitioners and for
retrievals and transfers

  The  Perinatal Protocols  work
group is developing standard
perinatal protocols for the State,
including common neo-natal
protocols, based on existing
evidence and using the Women s
and Children s  Perinatal Protocols
and Guidelines for Management 
booklet as the framework.

Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding has been identified as a
priority because of its nutritional and
protective importance and its role in
promoting bonding between mother and
child. Child and Youth Health has been
funded to promote breastfeeding with
an initial focus on general practitioners,
Aboriginal health workers and child and
youth health nurses.

A range of community, public and
private health services will also be
encouraged to become breastfeeding
friendly and the means for collecting
data will be strengthened.

Left: Geraldine Collins of
the Blackwood-
Coromandel Valley
Australian
Breastfeeding
Assoc. Group
feeding baby Claire

Centre Australian
Top: Breastfeeding

Assoc. sticker  
Breastfeeding
Welcome Here

Centre Newborn Infant
Below: Hearing Screening.

Mother of the baby
is Audrey Grantham

Newborn Infant Hearing
Screening

The Child and Youth Health Service is
the lead agency for the implementation
of universal neo-natal hearing testing
across South Australia. A steering
committee has been formed to oversee
this implementation process. It is
expected that universal testing will be
implemented by October 2002.

South Australian Council on
Reproductive Technology

During 2001 02 the SA Council on
Reproductive Technology addressed a
range of matters such as embryo
research, altruistic surrogacy
arrangements, the dissemination of
information on infertility and interests
of children born as a result of
reproductive technology, especially
where donated gametes are used.

The Council maintains open
communication with the reproductive
medicine units, consumer groups, the
media and other individuals and
groups involved in the area.

The Council s Resource Working Party
developed a pamphlet on infertility
which gives basic information and
access to both resources and support.
In 2001 it was translated into six

languages appropriate to South
Australia s cultural mix: Arabic,
Persian, Russian, Serbian, Croatian
and Bosnian. These have been widely
distributed and were welcomed by
agencies including the Migrant
Resource Centre.

In consultation with a group of
interested and committed indigenous
women, a culturally appropriate
pamphlet giving basic information on
fertility issues was produced. 10 000
have been printed and many
distributed to Aboriginal agencies and
communities. The development of
fertility information is of particular
importance for this culture as it is a
topic Aboriginal women find hard to
discuss or seek help for.

A pamphlet on telling children about
donor conception was also produced.
All of these pamphlets were launched
officially in October 2001 and have
been widely distributed

The Memoranda Review Working Party
was established in 2001 to determine
which memoranda, or part of
memoranda, need to be inserted into
the Code of Ethical Research Practice
Regulations 1995 and Code of Ethical
Clinical Practice Regulations 1995 in
order that they acquire the force of
law. Those which are not codified will
remain as instructions or guidelines for
clinical and research practice.

I. The Council accepted the
recommendation that Memorandum
1 be incorporated into the Codes to
the extent that a definition of
 infertility 2 be included in the Code
of Ethical Clinical Practice at
regulation 2 (the interpretation
section of the Code).

2. Where infertility means the inability or significantly reduced capacity of a person to conceive or otherwise bear or father a child, evidenced by:

I. a reasonable period of unprotected intercourse with no resulting pregnancy; or

II. a proven medical condition resulting in reduced fertility; or

III. other evidence presented to the treating medical practitioner.

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Seniors Card

DHS administers the SA Seniors Card.
A Seniors Card entitles a holder to
receive benefits and discounts for a
broad range of goods and services
including concessional travel on
public transport. In some instances
holders are eligible for a remission on
the Emergency Services Levy and
Council rates. At 30 June 2002,
approximately 250 000 older South
Australians were holding a Seniors
Card. Between 300 and 500 new
applications for Seniors Cards are
received each week.

Grants for Seniors

The Grants for Seniors program, for
people over 55 years, aims to:

  recognise the contribution of older
people to the community

  encourage the participation of
older people in their communities

  improve community attitudes
towards ageing and older people

  enhance the citizenship of
older people and help them
develop positive attitudes to
their own ageing.

The program received $406,000 State
funding in 2001 02. $50,000 of this
was allocated to Celebrate Seniors
Week.

The Grants for Seniors program is
divided into two streams:

  Equipment and Assistance provides
one-off grants up to $2000 to
purchase TVs, VCRs, sports
equipment and similar items

  One-off development grants of up to
$20 000 for research and innovative
pilot programs to promote positive
and healthy ageing.

Home Rehabilitation and
Support Service for
Older People

A State funded Transition Care
Project, the forerunner to the Home
Rehabilitation and Support Service
(HRSS), ran successfully from January
to December 2001.

The Commonwealth and State
Governments jointly fund the HRSS
(Pilot) which commenced in December
2001 (approximately $1 million per
annum for two years). The pilot
targets older people who have either
had an unnecessarily long stay, or
who are at risk of an extended stay in
the acute hospital system and who
are also at risk of premature
admission to a residential aged care
facility.

The HRSS provides short term
rehabilitation and support services
including short term residential care,
physiotherapy, occupational therapy,
nursing and personal care and
community based support services.
Ninety-two referrals were made from
21 December 2001 to 31 May 2002.

The Aged Care and Housing Group Inc
(ACH) manages the project. Thirteen
aged care providers form the Acute
Transition Alliance (ATA) which
provides residential places for the
HRSS as well as home and
community based services.

Retirement Villages
Legislation

DHS provides a telephone and
personal advice service to residents
and administering authorities of
retirement villages, which assists in
resolving disputes through mediation
and conciliation. It also investigates
alleged breaches of Retirement
Villages Act 1987.

In the financial year to 30 June 2002,
516 enquiries were received, 75% of
which related to financial and
contractual issues.

The Retirement Villages
(Miscellaneous) Amendment Act 2001
and the Retirement Villages
Regulations 2002 were passed by
Parliament in November 2001, were
proclaimed in January 2002, and will
be implemented on 1 July 2002.
Legislative changes will increase
protection for residents and enhance
the transparency of financial and
management practices amongst
administering authorities.

The Ageing and Community Care
Branch within the department advised
and assisted the industry to prepare for
implementation of legislative
amendments through the provision of
information sessions and resource
material. A review of the Act in its
entirety will be conducted during 2002.

Aboriginal Health
Framework Agreement/
Regional Health Planning

The South Australian Aboriginal
Health Framework Agreement (first
signed in 1996) was re-signed in 2001
by the South Australian Government,
Commonwealth Government
Department of Health and Ageing; the
Aboriginal Health Council of South
Australia and the Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Commission.
The Agreement continues to focus on
addressing health and wellbeing
disparities of Aboriginal peoples in
South Australia.

Key outcomes areas of the Agreement
include:

  The completion of an independent
evaluation of the  partnership
approach  to Aboriginal health in
South Australia

  A number of new priority areas,
in particular the encouragement
of expanded partnerships and
collaboration at local regional
levels; prisoner health and
sexual health

  A much greater emphasis on
accountability in relation to health
outcomes by all Commonwealth
and State Government funded
organisations

  The development of the next set of
Aboriginal Health Regional Plans
in 2001 02 through the Aboriginal
Primary Health Care Access
Program process.

Healthy Ways Project

The Healthy Ways Project, initiated in
November 2001 is funded by DHS and
the Department of Education and
Children s Services. It aims to reduce
tobacco use and promote healthy



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

29

eating amongst Aboriginal families in
South Australia, thereby improving
the health, education and well being
of Aboriginal community members.
It is particularly directed at pregnant
women; young women of child
bearing age; infants and pre-school
aged children; and primary and
secondary school students.

This will be achieved by applying
community capacity building methods,
working with specific communities to
design strategies at the local level to
improve educational and health
outcomes. In the first year (2002 03)
the project will work with two
communities:

  Western Eyre Region (Yalata/
Oak Valley)

  Far North and Western Region
(Coober Pedy/Oodnadatta).

Family and Youth Services to
the Aboriginal Community

FAYS at Coober Pedy and Ceduna
have been mapped as part of a
broader services planning approach.
FAYS continues to provide program
responses such as child protection,
alternative care, youth and justice
and anti-poverty services in an
integrated and coordinated way to
Aboriginal children, young people
and their families.

In the Riverland planning continues to
determine how best to meet the
needs of Aboriginal families, children
and young people.

The Port Augusta Aboriginal Families
Project is continuing.

A Whyalla Wellbeing Centre will be
developed following collaborative
DHS and community planning.

A Murray Bridge Aboriginal Family
Team is being created to respond to
the needs of Aboriginal families,
children and young people.

Marni Wodli (Good House) is a
proposed accommodation and support
service developed by DHS and key
Aboriginal organisations to provide
culturally appropriate accommodation
and support services for Aboriginal

young people fifteen to eighteen who
are unable to live at home.

The North Eastern Aboriginal Family
Service received funding from DHS 
Social Justice and Country Division to
develop, implement and evaluate a
holistic culture based service model
that provides specialised and
innovative services to Aboriginal
families. The service provides a
common entry point for families to
access health, housing and
community services in an integrated
and culturally appropriate way to
strengthen families and prevent
children coming into care. Through
consultation and partnership with
Aboriginal Elders and community
representatives, strategies will be
developed to work with families with
high and complex needs to prevent or
reduce the incidence of abuse or
neglect of Aboriginal children within
the northern metropolitan community.

Life Journeys

The  Life Journeys, making healthy
life choices  expo and conference
showcased many portfolio services
and encouraged people to adopt
healthy lifestyles. It led to events
promoting the  Making Healthy Life
Choices  message at World Stage SA
  Adelaide, the Centenary of
Federation   Family Race Day Picnic,
the Arlex Exhibition and at National
Youth Week.

DHS promoted this message at seven
regional events:

  Whyalla Show

  Yorke Peninsula Field Days

  Port Pirie Health Expo

  Waikerie Field Days

  Karoonda Farm Fair

  South East Field Days

  Port Lincoln   Cleve Field Days

Adelaide Royal Show 2001

The  Life Journeys  theme continued
at the DHS Royal Show display for
2001. DHS presented the public with
information derived from five key
communication themes: Access to
Services, Reconciliation, Food Safety,
Equity and Mental Health. The Royal
Show display also featured three
hospital redevelopment models/plans
and included tributes to the
International Year for Volunteers and
Men s Health.

Healthy SA

DHS  HealthySA web site was
enhanced to incorporate a number of
new features. The site continues to
gain a higher profile amongst the
South Australian community, and
during March 2002 the number of
access requests to the site, reached a
high of 225 000.

Health Promotion

Courses and workshops have been
conducted in building skills in health
promotion including a successful
program on mental health promotion
in country regions and the
establishment of a network in
nutrition. Four seminars have been
held on the social determinants of
health and well being as well as
inequalities in health status. These
have been well attended by an
average of 150 people per seminar.

Food Bill and Safety
Standards

A new Food Bill was passed by the
Parliament in July 2001 and, subject to
public consultation on regulation
designed to deal with administrative
issues under the Act, will be proclaimed
to commence on 1 December 2002.
The new Food Safety Standards will be
called up by the Act to commence on
the same date.



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

30

A Food Safety Reform Section of the
Environmental Health Branch within
DHS has been established to assist
with improving public health by
ensuring the coordinated roll out and
successful implementation and take up
of new food safety reforms within SA.

Water Quality

DHS is participating in the
preparation of the World Health
Organisation Guidelines for Drinking
Water Quality (3rd Edition) and has
taken a lead role in the national risk
assessment of rural and remote
drinking water supplies.

Waste Control Systems

The Environmental Health Branch of
DHS has provided advice and support
for the development and upgrade of
reuse schemes including those
associated with the Glenelg, Port
Lincoln and the new Victor Harbor
Wastewater Treatment Plants. DHS
monitors the operations of over eighty
existing systems including the Virginia
Pipeline Scheme and the Christies
Beach-Willunga pipeline.

Tobacco

The department s targeted campaigns
to reduce the prevalence of smoking,
particularly amongst young people,
were again successful with a
continued decrease in the smoking
rate for 2001.

The current smoking rate in the 15-29
age group reduced from 33.0% for
males and 28.9% for females in 1999
to 30.6% for males and 23.7% for
females in 2001. The smoking rate
across all age groups reduced from
25% in 1999 to 24.

The Tobacco Control Unit has
continued to work in the 3 main areas
of the State Strategy:

  cessation of tobacco use;

  prevention of uptake of smoking;
and

  promotion of a smoke-free culture
and environment.

Rates of smoke-free homes and
cars continued to improve in
South Australia in 2001, with 79%
of homes and 82% of cars being
smoke-free.

Rates of exposure to passive smoking
in the workplace decreased for the
first time since 1998, with 9% of
workers being exposed at work in
2001 (12% in 2000).

97% of the population and 95% of
smokers believe smoking causes
illness and/or damage to the body.

A similar campaign at the 2002
smoke-free Adelaide Cup found that
over 90% of respondents had heard
and understood what the smoke
free campaign meant and almost
90% supported smoke free areas
at the races.

Alcohol. Go Easy

Over 450 of South Australia s
hospitality staff were trained in
Alcohol. Go Easy principles as part of
the smoke-free Adelaide Cup
Carnival. This is an excellent example
of how the Health Through
Sponsorship program extends beyond
the funded projects and into the
broader South Australian community.

Cross collaboration was arranged with
SA Police who conducted voluntary on
course breath testing on both the
Saturday and Monday of the 2002
Oakbank Racing Carnival. The Alcohol.
Go Easy health campaign was
implemented at Oakbank through the
provision of standard drink information
cards and merchandise to volunteers
who were tested. Smart Choice food
options were provided at six food
outlets throughout the race course and
Smart Choice was promoted through
the public address system and on the
Clipsal Supascreen.

Left: Balloons used to
launch the Smoking
Kills Sign Dec 01

Centre Mounting yard
Below:  signage

Right Artwork by Jason
Top: Cooper, Marion

Youth Centre,
produced through
a youth Action
Against Smoking
Grant. Displayed at
various launches
including World
No Tobacco Day
May 02 and
Smoking Kills
sign launch
December 01

Right: Boundary fence,
Centre: Oakbank

Right: Oakbank,
Below: Clipsal event

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ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

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Immunisation

The immunisation coverage for
children for first dose Measles,
Mumps and Rubella Vaccine (due at
12 months) was 94%; for children
aged 12-15 months (fully vaccinated)
was 91%; and for children 24-27
months was 90%. This is 2% higher
than the national immunisation rate
and SA shares the highest coverage
rate with Tasmania.

Flu vaccine coverage for people aged
65 years and over was 80% for the
2001 flu season. The SA Vaccine
Distribution Centre distributed
1.0 million doses of vaccine to
children, adolescents and the elderly
through 910 surgeries and clinics,
hospitals, Aboriginal health services,
community health centres and
councils during 2001 02. Vaccine
wastage has been reduced to 2.1%
of all doses distributed compared
with the national target of 10%.
Most wastage was due to cold-chain
failure (usually inadvertant freezing)
while stored at GP surgeries.

Gambling

A variety of initiatives have been
undertaken to inform the community
about problem gambling including
advertisements, resources,
development of a report on school
based programs, strategies to increase
general practitioner recognition of

problem gambling and a small grants
program to support local activities.

BreastScreen SA

At 31 December 2001, 65.8% of
South Australian women in the target
age group of 50-69 were participating
in the breastscreening program over
24 months. The national target is 70%
and BreastScreen SA had the highest
participation rate nationally. In the
metropolitan area, 64.5% of the
target age group were participating
and 69.4% in the rural/remote areas.

SA Cervix Screening
Program

In the two year period
2000 01, 265 242 women
(66.3%) in the target age
group of 20-69 years were
screened. The SA Cervix
Screening Program is
working towards a 70%
participation in regular two
year screening by all women in the
target population.

Older women have been a particular
focus for campaign activities and
have shown an increase in screening
rates over the 2000 01 two-year
period. There has been an increase in
older women having pap smears, but
a slight decrease in women under 30.

The SA Cervix Screening Program has
had a significant effect on reducing
the incidence of, and deaths from,
cervical cancer in South Australian
women since the Program s inception.
South Australia has the lowest
incidence and death rates from
cervical cancer of all Australian states
and territories.

Aboriginal Women s
Screening Program

The Aboriginal Women s Screening
Program responds to the high
incidence of cervical cancer among
Aboriginal women which is four to six
times more common than for non-
indigenous women.

During 2001 02, the Women s
Screening Program developed
promotional materials addressing the
importance of both cervical and
breast screening for Aboriginal
women. Promotional strategies
included the development of a poster
and a video for dissemination in
community controlled health centres
and to community womens' groups.

Key outcomes during 2001 02
included a 40% increase in screening
rates of Indigenous women at
Tullawon Health Service in the Yalata

Aboriginal community (from 50% in
1999 00 to 90% in 2000 01). This
was due to:

  Permanent staff in the clinic
service

  More coordinated approach to
addressing womens issues

  Ongoing health promotion and
education sessions for women in
the community

  Allocation of grant submission
funding from the Aboriginal
Services Division, DHS.

Above: Breastscreen SA
bus

Left: Breastscreen SA
mammogram.
L to R   unnamed
client and Maria
Gent, Acting Chief
Radiographer



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

32

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Diabetes Management

The Diabetes Strategic Management
Group (DSMG), established in
November 2001, coordinates and
implements the policy direction in
DHS  Strategic Plan for Diabetes in
South Australia. The DSMG has
undertaken a comprehensive audit of
diabetes activity from DHS divisions
and the SA Divisions of General
Practice, and has established a
priority work plan for implementation.

Major diabetes programs and projects
funded by DHS have included the
Southern Diabetes Project, Diabetes
Pathways Project, Diabetes Outreach
Service and the Free Needles and
Syringes Initiative.

Major outcomes from Diabetes
Services include the service planning
and networks model being
implemented in metropolitan SA,
beginning with the Southern Region,
and the establishment of a State
Strategy and Action Plan for
Aboriginal Diabetes.

Renal and Urology

As part of the 2000 2011 Renal and
Urology Clinical Services Plan a
Renal and Urology Services Clinical
Reference Group with two subgroups
(transplant and dialysis) have been
established. The transplant sub-
group has worked to develop a
strategy for the review of the
transplant service, and explore
options for the management
structure of the state s renal services
and surgical staffing needs.

The dialysis sub-group has focussed on
the operational aspects of the
movement of satellite dialysis services
to Noarlunga Health Service and Lyell
McEwin Health Service, and is working
to establish uniform and consistent
approaches to the provision of dialysis.
A dialysis costing study, examining the
costs associated with the various
modalities for dialysis, was completed.

Organ Donation

South Australia has consistently had a
higher proportion of organ donors than
other states. Direct benefits to the SA
community include higher kidney
transplantation rates, and no waiting
lists for corneal transplantation.

There are a number of support
strategies for donor families. These
include the annual  Gift of Life  rose
planting, and the Thanksgiving
service. The donor family support
group  Given in Faith and Trust (GIFT) 
meets monthly, and teleconferencing
support is available for donor families
who are isolated.

The Australian Organ Donor
Awareness Week was held in
February 2002 to encourage family
discussion regarding organ donation
and to encourage individuals to
register on the Australian Organ
Donor Register. Many organ donor
families and transplant recipients
shared their personal stories with the
local media.

Tissue Retention
Hotline Service

A Tissue Retention Hotline Service was
established in June 2001 in response
to publicity concerning organ and
tissue retention following autopsy.

The service has responded to over
1 400 inquiries and offers freely
available counselling to all inquirers.
These inquiries relate to the years
1933   2001 and involve over 35
hospitals or institutions. Every inquiry
has been investigated and followed
up individually:

  340 attended face to face
interviews to receive outcome
findings

  940 received information by
telephone

  All inquirers received written
confirmation of outcome

  200 baby burial sites have been
identified.

The Hotline will be retained
indefinitely and a long-term
management plan for future inquiries
has been established. A report is
being prepared and a memorial
service is planned for 14 July 2002.

Centre: Organ Donation.
Happy Heart and
Billy Kidney

Right: Special feature
at the
Tissue Retention
Memorial Service



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

33

Mental Health

Achievements in mental health which
promote quality of life included:

  The continued expansion of
pilot initiatives in supported
accommodation options providing
alternatives to institutional
care for people with a
psychiatric disability

  Commencing establishment of a
collaborative framework across
the Housing, Disability, and
Health sectors

  Developing Service Specifications
to facilitate non government
organisation sector service
purchasing

  Agreeing upon a service model
and a trial for the DHS Service
Framework for People with
Exceptional Needs.

Country SA
Workforce Initiatives

Recruitment and retention of the rural
workforce remains a significant and
ongoing issue for employers and for
rural communities. The Rural
Development Unit within the
department, in collaboration with
regional human service providers, has
implemented a range of recruitment,
retention and development strategies
within the broader context of
workforce planning including:

  School visits and rural clubs

  A CD-rom, including information
about careers and training options

  Nursing Cadetships

  Pika Wiya Unique Centre of
Learning for Aboriginal people

  Indigenous Traineeships   to
facilitate opportunities for
indigenous youth

  Vocational Education and Training
In Schools Program

  Clinical Placement Grant Scheme
  to support and encourage
students studying human service
professions to undertake rural
placements

  SA Rural Education Scholarship
Scheme   providing scholarships
to full time students studying
human services undergraduate
degree. Five Aboriginal students
received scholarships in 2002.

  Postgraduate scholarship scheme
and mentoring program

  Peer shadowing program

  Midwifery skills enhancement
project

Recruitment of Rural
General Practitioners

The Rural Doctors Workforce Agency
(RDWA) (formerly the South
Australian Rural &amp; Remote Medical
Support Agency) received State and
Commonwealth funds to coordinate
activities and strategies to assist
recruitment and retention of doctors
in rural SA in 2001 02. Consequently
the number of general practitioner
vacancies in rural South Australia
has decreased.

An extension of subsidies for the
provision of locum relief, particularly
for solo and two-doctor practices,
was provided for GP groups during
2001 02. The RDWA has assisted
with GP workforce planning including
support, resourcing and mentorship of
university rural clubs; initiating and
supporting rural clubs to introduce
country high school students to
consider a medical career in the
country; a project which will assist
medical students and graduates to
gain placements with experienced
country doctors; and continuing
medical education for rural general
practitioner s and resident specialists.

The State funded Rural Health
Enhancement Package provides
significant financial reward to
resident country practitioners at an
annual cost of $7 million. The
package was introduced to
complement Fee For Service
arrangements within public hospitals.
Over 300 General Practitioners, 35
resident specialists and 60 hospitals
are involved in one or more
components of the package.

The State provided $1 375 500 to the
RDWA in 2001 02 including some
funds from the Commonwealth
through the Medical Specialists
Outreach Assistance Program to
recruit visiting psychiatrists to rural
areas. At June 2002, seven new
psychiatric services had been
provided. The targeted strategy to
recruit and retain Overseas Trained
Doctors (OTD) has had continued
success with 34 overseas trained
doctors having been recruited into
South Australia during 2001 02.

SA is now participating in the
Commonwealth five year OTD
scheme. $100 000 was provided to
the RDWA to assist individual doctors
to achieve Fellowship of the Royal
Australasian College of General
Practitioners.

Disability Services

The Disability Services Office within
the department is implementing the
Disability Services Planning and
Funding Framework, which was
developed following considerable
community consultation and which
identifies the present distribution of
disability services in South Australia.
There is broad agreement across the
disability sector around the more
important themes including:

  Agencies working together to
solve problems for people with
complex needs

  The creation of community options
for people currently residing in
institutions

  The development of common
assessment tools to ensure
benchmarking of support
services for people in
accommodation day options

  Working closely with the aged
care sector to develop appropriate
service models for people with
disabilities and who are ageing

  Clarifying the roles of DHS as
funder, and the agencies
conducting options coordination
programs as lead agencies
working closely with individuals
around their needs.



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

34

The disability sector is providing
quality services through:

  The implementation and
monitoring of national standards
for disability services through
funding and service agreements
and an external qualified
audit process

  The completion of the first stage
of the funding and purchasing
project establishing Provider Panel
Agreements for all Disability
Service Office funded agencies

  The relocation of the twenty-eight-
bed brain injury unit to Hampstead
Centre

  The construction of the Northgate
Aged Care facility for fifty people
with intellectual disabilities  
nearing completion

  The relocation of fifty-two people
from Julia Farr Services and
Strathmont Centre into community
based accommodation

  The completion of the information
technology infrastructure project
for options coordination

  The completion of the
Administrative Review of
Independent Living and
Equipment Program

  The completion of the first stage
of the establishment of culturally
appropriate disability services on
the Anangu Pitjantjatjara (AP)
lands with the tabling of the John
Tregenza report  Review of the
delivery of services to people with
disabilities on the AP lands .

To assist in establishing an
information-enabled community,
DHS  Disability Services Office and
Information Management Services
have rolled out an information
technology infrastructure across the
disability sector. The aim is to
establish an effective information
network that will provide the
Disability Services Office, Options
Coordination Programs, Service
Delivery Agencies and clients with a
level of information that will enable
the provision of appropriate, cost
efficient services to the community.

The roll-out resulted in 193
superseded computers being
distributed to persons with a
disability through the Physical
Disability Council of South Australia
and Options Coordination.

Urban Regeneration

Throughout 2001 02 the South
Australian Housing Trust (SAHT)
continued its lead role in progressing
urban regeneration and engaging
communities, local government and
the private sector to contribute to
area renewal. Urban renewal
activities in 2001 02 focussed on
 The Parks (Westwood), Salisbury
North, Windsor Gardens, Mitchell
Park, Port Lincoln and Port Pirie.

In all projects, community and
economic development activities
were undertaken in conjunction with
the physical regeneration.

This regeneration was complemented
by the SAHT s Better Neighbourhoods
Program, which will renew several
older areas of public housing on a
gradual and progressive basis. The
mainly self-funded program will
provide new housing opportunities for
the community in the metropolitan
area, at the same time as replacing
older SAHT housing.

Before-Birthing and Beyond
  A Healthy Start for
Women from Rural and
Remote Areas

The Before-Birthing and Beyond Project
  A Healthy Start for Women in Rural
and Remote areas, which concluded in
June 2002, was an eight month project
funded by the National Women s
Health Program through DHS  Social
Justice and Country Division. The
project aimed to increase the capacity
for better system coordination and
more appropriate support services for
women from rural and remote areas
requiring pre-natal and post-natal care.
Four regions were identified as having
significant needs and the project
focussed on the Northern and

Urban
Regeneration
photo to be
supplied

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Right: Twighlight concerts
held within the
Westwood
re-development
area. Indigenous
dance group,
Tal Kin Jeri
performing at
the Australia Day
Concert.



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

35

Far Western, Eyre, Riverland and South
East regions. The project delivered a
mapping of existing support services
and good practice programs, and
improved communication and
collaboration between agencies and
service providers. The project
culminated in a forum,  Before-Birthing
and Beyond, Strengthening the Links
for Collaborative Action  which aimed
to increase awareness and
understanding of current good practice
initiatives, building the capacity and
goodwill of both metropolitan and
country workers sharing information
and critical success factors.

Port Pirie Lead
Implementation Program

The Port Pirie Lead Implementation
Program assists the Port Pirie
community to achieve an acceptable
balance between safeguarding the
health of its residents, the ongoing
viability of the world s largest lead
smelter and the sustainability of the
City of Port Pirie. The program
investigates ongoing sources and
pathways of lead exposure and
develops strategies to control
sources and reduce household
exposure, particularly for  at risk 
groups such as pregnant women and
children below the age of four years.
It also assists members of the
community to achieve lower blood
lead levels and protect future
generations of children from
unacceptable levels of heavy metal
exposure.

In a world first, the program identified
early infancy as the beginning of the
steady increase in blood lead levels,
which has resulted in a refocussing of
investigation and intervention
strategies on in-house exposure of
infants and pregnant women.

The average blood lead level (children
1-4 years of age) increased slightly in
2001 to 9.8 g/dL although this result
is still consistent with the downward
trend since 1984 when the program
began. 55% of all young children in
Port Pirie, and 76% of young children
who reside in the higher risk/

exposure areas of Port Pirie, exceed
the National goal level of 10 g/dL.

Epidemiology Branch

The Epidemiology Branch within the
department has worked
collaboratively with other agencies to
increase the level of safety on the
State s roads, in its schools, and in its
sports entertainment venues. In
addition, the Branch has assisted in
the promotion of healthy pregnancies
and best practice in the care and
management of cancer patients.

The branch has organised special
data collections and conducted formal
analyses of a number of issues
relating to health system evaluation.
These issues included survival of
major trauma, teenage pregnancy,
birth defects, pregnancy outcomes by
region and outcomes for cancer
screening and treatment.

Violence Prevention

DHS is responsible for providing
services to people affected by all forms
of violence, including family violence,
child neglect and abuse, rape and
sexual assault. A literature review was
completed and consultations are
progressing through DHS  Strategic
Planning and Policy Division to develop
a strategic approach to achieve best
outcomes for people impacted by, or at
risk of, violence.

DHS  Metropolitan Health Division
funds four metropolitan community
health services to provide a primary
service delivery role to the
community. Additionally, funds are
directed to women s emergency
housing, telephone response services,
violence intervention programs and a
range of community support
initiatives for people experiencing
domestic and family violence.

DHS works with key partners to
develop innovative responses to
addressing violence and places
emphasis on early intervention. DHS
has been involved in a range of
partnership initiatives. The  Out of
Sight: Not Out of Mind  project

managed by DHS  Strategic Planning
and Policy Division and the Mental
Health Unit was implemented. The
project aims are to address the impact
of domestic violence on mental health
outcomes for women involved in the
correctional system. Funding through
the Commonwealth Partnership
Against Domestic Violence Initiative
enabled work at the Women s Prison
and a project in the southern
metropolitan area to be progressed.

A tool for identifying domestic
violence in hospital Emergency
Departments was trialed by Lyell
McEwin Health Service, Noarlunga
Public Hospital and The Queen
Elizabeth Hospital. The project was
funded under the  Partnerships
Against Domestic Violence  Initiative.

Human Services to
Prisoners and Offenders

DHS has developed a coordinated
response to the human service needs
of prisoners and offenders and is
undertaking activities with correctional
facilities. A Memorandum of
Understanding between Department
for Correctional Services and DHS for
the provision of health care services to
prisoners and offenders was drafted.

Consultation and research was
undertaken to identify the health
needs of young people within Magill
and Cavan Training Centres in order to
develop agreed strategies regarding
the coordination and planning of
health services in the two centres.

Consent to Medical
Treatment and Palliative
Care Act 1995

In June 2002, responsibility for
community education on The Consent
to Medical Treatment and Palliative
Care Act 1995 (Consent Act)
transferred from DHS to the Office of
the Public Advocate (OPA). This was a
logical progression as the OPA, a
community-based organisation, already
provided education to the general
public on the range of advance
directives available in SA and the
relevant legislation. To ensure



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

36

consistency and to reduce the layers
that the public must negotiate in
accessing information, the OPA now
has responsibility to provide advice
and information to the community on
all the advance directive options in SA:

  Medical Power of Attorney (under
the Consent Act)

  Anticipatory Direction (under the
Consent Act)

  Enduring Power of Guardianship
(under the Guardianship and
Administration Act 1993)

  Enduring Power of Attorney (under
the Power of Attorney and Agency
Act 1984)

In 2001, approximately 416 inquiries
(around 35 calls per month) were dealt
with by DHS, down from about 500 in
2000. About 55% were from the
general community and 45% were
service providers such as aged care
facilities and general practitioner
clinics. 8% of calls were from country
areas. The majority of calls required
medical power of attorney or advanced
directives forms to be sent out.

DHS  Insurance Services Unit
continues to provide advice and
support to service providers in the
public sector on aspects of the
legislation.

Palliative Care Strategy

DHS s  Strategic Plan for Palliative
Care Services 1998-2006  was
launched in April 1998 to drive
development and set the direction for
mainstreaming South Australia s
palliative care services. Priorities
listed in the Strategic Plan have now
largely been achieved. In November
2001 DHS commenced an internal
review of SA Palliative Care Services.
This review will deliver a set of
strategic and operational directions
for managing palliative care services
across metropolitan and rural South

Australia that reflects best practice,
supports current and future demand
levels and facilitates equitable
allocation of resources.

The DHS continues to fund the
Palliative Care Council as a resource
and information service.

Telephone Help Lines

The Telephone HelpLine Network
Project, funded by the National Health
Development Fund, is networking over
130 Helplines that service the South
Australian human service sector.
Assistance is being provided to these
Help Lines in the form of improved
telephony call management software
and hardware where appropriate,
service protocols and training resulting
in a better understanding of the core
function of each Helpline and in callers
receiving a better quality of service.

During 2001 02 a scoping exercise
was completed for the Help Line
Network Project and consultations are
occurring with the mental health sector
regarding this proposed service.

DHS continues to assess the progress
of health call centre trials and
initiatives interstate and overseas.
This network of Help Lines will
improve the capacity of service
providers to meet the human service
sector demand for telephone services.

Community Benefit SA

The Community Benefit SA (CBSA)
fund is established under the Gaming
Machines Act 1992 and is allocated
$3 million annually from gaming
machine taxes.

In 2001 02:

  Normal Grants Program guidelines
were modified to provide greater
clarity and detail in relation to
purpose, outcomes and the
definition of disadvantage

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  336 one-off projects were funded
($2.3 million) to 275 non-
government community
organisations to benefit
disadvantaged people across
South Australia under the Normal
Grant Program (grants of under
$30 000)

  12 large charities received first
instalments of a three-year
Strategic Special Grants Program
funded for $2.1 million (maximum
of $75 000 per agency per year)

  A conference, entitled  Sharing
Success  was held in November
2001 to celebrate five years of
CBSA. Over 200 people attended
to hear 20 presentations on
successful projects

  Seven funding application
workshops and a fundraising skills
workshop were conducted in
conjunction with other peak
bodies for over 500 individuals.

Grants to Non-Government
Agencies

DHS has taken over responsibility for
the management of service
agreements and funding for non-
government agencies previously
funded via the Drug and Alcohol
Services Council. The services
provided by these non-government
agencies include assessment,
counselling, referral, crisis
intervention, treatment, sobering-up
services, education and training.



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STRATEGIC DIRECTION NUMBER 3

DHS ensures that people in greatest need receive priority support and access to
services in health, housing and community service.

REDISTRIBUTING
RESOURCES IN A
CHANGING
ENVIRONMENT

Budget

DHS  Financial Services has worked to
improve budget modelling and resource
allocation process. This assists those
services providing direct outputs to
clients to adequately resource special
projects and core services.

Spatial Mapping

DHS has provided funding to GISCA
(National Key Centre for the Spatial
Applications of Geospatial Information
Systems, University of Adelaide) to
undertake a spatial mapping exercise
in Metropolitan Adelaide. The
initiative has been piloted in the
Northern Metropolitan Area through
the Northern Metropolitan Community
Health Service (NMCHS).

Maps have been generated at regional,
local and collector district levels and
have provided the NMCHS with vital
planning information. These maps can
be built up with a range of data,
including health conditions, school
card holders, transport routes and
patterns of community health client
service use. The prototype will be
expanded to include all metropolitan
areas and will assist in planning and
resource allocation decisions.

Home and Community Care
Growth Funding

Home and Community Care (HACC)
services include a range of basic
maintenance and support services to
enable frail older people, younger
people with disabilities, and their
carers to be more independent in the
community. These supports are
aimed at enhancing quality of life
and/or preventing premature or
inappropriate admission to long term
residential care.

In 2001 02, there was a 7.7% increase
in funding (approximately $6.3 million)
for the HACC program in South
Australia. Total funding available was
approximately $88 million, of which
the Commonwealth Government
contributed approximately $54 million
and the State Government
approximately $34 million.



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

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Partnership Outreach
Education Model Pilot

The Youth Education Centre school
delivers education and training within
the Magill and Cavan Training Centres
and at outreach centres, including the
Flexi Centre at Magill. The school was
successful in gaining Commonwealth
funding to create a  virtual school 
across the community, a network of
providers using flexible delivery
models to ensure young peoples
educational and training experiences,
regardless of where they occur, are
accredited, recorded and tracked.

Youth Connect

Commonwealth funding was provided
over two years to trial this discrete
collaborative, educative project
between Family and Youth Services
and Centrelink. The project works at a
systems and individual level to ensure
young people access and maintain
appropriate entitlements, and that
government and non government
providers work collaboratively to
support young people in accessing and
participating in programs and services
appropriate to their individual
developmental needs.

Youth Service and Juvenile
Justice Service planning and
information management

In 2001 02 FAYS developed Youth
Services and Juvenile Justice Services
Planning Frameworks outlining the key
areas of FAYS service delivery and
participated in the development of a
National Minimum Data Set for
young offenders.

Substance Abuse Supported
Services For Young People

The Illicit Drugs: Juvenile Justice Pilot
Program targets young people on
Juvenile Justice Orders with substance
misuse issues. FAYS received funds
through the Police Drug Diversion
Initiative to provide the Substance
Abuse Support Service for Youth
(SASSY). The services are delivered in
partnership with the Salvation Army,
Ingle Farm Corps (Northern

Metropolitan area) and the Adelaide
Central Mission (Southern
Metropolitan area). The project has
been based on national and
international understandings that the
service delivery model must provide
intensive, youth-specific support and
linkages and address the holistic needs
of these young people in order to
impact on their offending behaviour.

Port Augusta Youth Support
Strategy

The Port Augusta Youth Support
Service was developed from meetings
between Port Augusta Council,
government agencies, non
government service providers,
representatives of the Aboriginal
Community through Aboriginal &amp;
Torres Strait Islander Commission
(ATSIC), the Pika Wiya Health Service,
the Aboriginal Visiting Service,
Davenport Community and Port
Augusta Council s Aboriginal Advisory
Committee. The service will develop
youth activities support, and services
such as counselling, health programs,
and family support services. It will
also provide a youth work response on
the streets after hours on Friday and
Saturday nights. Funding and support
has been jointly provided by the
Attorney General s Department, local
government and DHS.

Improving Outcomes for
Children and Young People
in Alternative Care and
Under the Guardianship of
the Minister

Working with Carers Working in
Partnership   Aberfoyle Park, Port
Pirie and Modbury FAYS District
Centres are working within an action
learning framework with alternative
care service providers and the CREATE
Foundation Inc (a national youth
advocacy organisation) to develop and
implement local solutions to improve
outcomes for children and young
people in alternative care and under
the Guardianship of the Minister.

In 2001 the Department of Education
Training and Employment and FAYS
gained approval to exchange and

analyse data for children under
Guardianship of the Minister and
children in alternative care to develop
their profile regarding chronic non
attendance, suspension and exclusion
and the basic skills test compared
with other State averages. The
acquired data, existing research and
service knowledge will be used to
design and trial targeted interventions
with the view to developing
sustainable longer term interventions.

North West Children s and
Families  Integration
Project

The North West Children s and
Families  Integration Project brought
together three programs (The Parenting
Network, Kids  n  You, and Tier 3) into a
framework which emphasises a
coordinated and suitable response to
strengthening families.

During 2001 02 the project continued
to develop a regional integrated
approach to planning for children and
families across the North West
Metropolitan Area, while maintaining
the integrity of the three programs.
The Tier 3 Program evaluation was
completed, and Tier 3 based at
Northern Child and Adolescent
Mental Health Service changed its
name to  Family Outreach .

Northern Venture
Coordinated Care Trial

The Northern Venture Coordinated
Care Trial aims to improve primary
health care and community services for
older people with chronic, complex
needs in the Northern Metropolitan
Area of Adelaide by reducing avoidable
hospital admissions and delaying
admission to residential care.

In 2001 02, much of the preparatory
work to begin the trial was
completed, including the signing of
the trial agreement between the
Commonwealth Department of Health
and Ageing and DHS in June 2002,
with funding of $4.36 million being
committed over three years.

Major participating groups include
DHS; Adelaide Northern Division of

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General Practice; Adelaide North East
Division of General Practice; Lyell
McEwin Health Service; Northern
Domiciliary Care Service; Royal District
Nursing Service; Helping Hand Aged
Care; Council on the Ageing; Aged and
Community Services; and Aboriginal
Health Council.

The active phase of the trial will
begin in late 2002 and be completed
in mid 2005.

Health and Well being
Program   Goreta

The Aboriginal Services Division, DHS
in conjunction with the Goreta
Aboriginal Corporation has
established a health and well being
program addressing alcohol and other
substance misuse at the Point Pearce
community on Yorke Peninsula.

The 12 month project, run in
conjunction with the Aboriginal
Sobriety Group and the Drug and
Alcohol Services Council, is nearing
completion. It provides an integrated
approach to address a whole of
community problem.

The development of a recreational
area within the community confines of
Point Pearce provides a community
based diversionary awareness
program that is specifically focussed
on alcohol and other drug misuse
within the Point Pearce Community.

Aboriginal Youth Action
Committees

The Aboriginal Services Division (ASD)
has progressed the re-establishment
of Aboriginal Youth Action
Committees across the State. These
committees provide an opportunity for
Aboriginal youth to develop leadership
skills and provide a mechanism for an
 Aboriginal youth voice  at the local,
regional and statewide levels.

ASD is also working with the DHS 
Metropolitan Health Division and
FAYS in developing an Aboriginal
Youth Development Program. 21 youth
workers across the State will work
with Aboriginal young people and
ensure links with other mainstream
activities where possible.

Environmental Health
Worker Initiative

Indigenous environmental health
capacity building is a key factor in the
attainment of proper standards of
environmental health for rural remote
Aboriginal communities. With a
commitment to building capacity and
social capital, the Department
successfully employed, trained and
supported one community based
Indigenous Environmental Health
Worker (IEHW) in the Far West. This
program has provided momentum to
develop a sustainable IEHW workforce
throughout South Australia. Preliminary
discussions has generated
Departmental and SA Aboriginal Health
Partnership support for the development
of an IEHW Initiative to address IEHW
employment and training issues.

Anti-Poverty Preventative
Projects

Through its Anti-Poverty Program at
district centres, and in collaboration
with community agencies, FAYS
develops and delivers a range of
programs aimed at strengthening
communities by addressing needs at
local level. Programs undertaken
during 2001 02 included Improved
Access to Whitegoods for Aboriginal
Clients, Neporendi Aboriginal Sewing
Project, School Breakfast Programs,
Financial Counseling Kits and Home
Starter Kits for children under the
Guardianship of the Minister moving
to independent living.

Implementation of the
Metropolitan Community
Health Services Review

From August 2001 a steering group
(consisting of chief executive officers of
the Metropolitan Community Health
Service and representatives of DHS) led
the implementation of the Metropolitan
Community Health Service Review.
Main outcomes included

  Defining core services (ie
community development and
building community capacity;
mental health; physical health;
early childhood services; drugs and

alcohol; interpersonal violence;
and sexual and reproductive health)

  An agreed approach to the service
which can include any or all of the
following activities: personal care
and treatment services;
rehabilitation and support for
community living, including
domiciliary care; health promotion
and illness prevention; and
community development

  Consistency with State and
National policy directions and
priorities

  The services and programs.

These outcomes will form the basis of
future service agreements, with the
long term goal of linking outcomes/
outputs and resource allocation to
these service agreements.

Elective Surgery Strategy

An additional $6.5 million was
allocated for elective surgery in
2001 02 targeting long wait hip/knee
replacements, other orthopaedic
procedures, cataract procedures,
paediatric ear, nose and throat
procedures and overdue urgent and
semi-urgent procedures. From July
2001 to March 2002 an additional 716
procedures were performed.

From January 2001 to March 2002
(most recent quarterly data available):

  Category 1 (urgent)   88.6% of
patients were admitted within the
desirable period of 30 days

  Category 2 (semi-urgent)   83.4%
of patients were admitted within
the desirable period of 90 days

  Category 3 (non-urgent)   95.4%
of patients were admitted within
12 months

  50% of patients received their
surgery within six weeks

  90% of patients were treated
within 28 weeks.

Ongoing audits are conducted of
overdue patients, cancellations are
monitored and regular meetings are
held between DHS staff and hospital
representatives.



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

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After Hours Primary
Medical Care

The provision of After Hours Primary
Medical Care (AHPMC) has become a
prominent issue because of its growing
impact on hospital emergency
department services.

During 2001 02, DHS undertook a
number of collaborative AHPMC projects
and analyses with primary care
providers and State based
organisations. The aim was to better
understand the context, issues and
impact of primary care patients on the
provision of and demand for hospital
emergency department services.

DHS initiated three General Practitioner
Emergency Department Co-location
Trials in the Adelaide metropolitan area
(at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, the
Women s and Children s Hospital and
the Blackwood Community Private
Hospital) for an initial 12 week period.

The trials were well received by the
public and demonstrated that many
primary care patients arriving at the
emergency departments were able to
be quickly and effectively treated by a
general practitioner.

DHS, in partnership with the South
Australian Divisions of General Practice
Incorporated, undertook an economic
analysis of the provision of AHPMC to
develop a sustainable model for South
Australia. Although a model was
produced which could have improved
access and equity while expanding after
hours general practitioner services, the
barriers to change outweighed the
potential benefits and this model could
not be implemented within the current
general practitioner funding system.

Improving Aboriginal
people s access to General
Practitioners

During 2001 02 the Aboriginal Services
Division has been actively involved in
several major initiatives aimed at
improving Aboriginal people s access to
General Practitioners and addressing GP
recruitment and retention. Key
achievements during the reporting
period included:

  Regional Health Service
partnership developments in both
Ceduna and Coober Pedy with a GP
practice being established at
Umoona Tjutagku Health Service
(two doctors are in residence)

  Contribution to the development of
the Memorandum of Understanding
(MOU)/Bilateral Agreement
between the Commonwealth and
South Australia to establish greater
collaboration for Australia within
the Primary Health and Community
Care Framework; and MOU
between the South Australian
Division of General Practice,
Divisions of General Practice and
DHS. The Aboriginal Services
Division, strengthened the context
of these documents to reflect the
needs of Aboriginal people.

Coober Pedy
Alcohol Strategy

The Aboriginal Services Division
supports the development of the
Alcohol Strategy in Coober Pedy and
remains involved in its implementation
in the Aboriginal community. The
strategy aims to reduce demand
and supply, minimize harm and
rehabilitate individuals.

Priority focus areas during 2001 02
included:

  the establishment of a Sobering
Up/Day Centre (a number of
properties are being considered
subject to further development of
plans for those projects);

  Mobile Assistance Patrol
(operational   funded by
Aboriginal Services Division and
provided by the Aboriginal
Sobriety Group);

  Meals programs for drinkers,
including transients (funded by the
Aboriginal Services Division)  
having a measurable impact,
traditional people accessing the
program are utilising hygiene
facilities and being referred on for
health follow up;

  Liquor licensing restrictions (being
negotiated including  Umoona
going dry ); and

  Rehabilitation and early
intervention/detection
(negotiations are occurring with the
Port Augusta program regarding
joint rehabilitation programs).

In Ceduna, the Aboriginal Services
Division has successfully instituted
integrated planning to provide
services for homeless and transient
people. The Elders Camp/Town Camp
development is well progressed.
Alcohol use among many in this group
is an endemic problem. An Alcohol
Strategy has been developed and an
Implementation strategy, based on
community development principles, is
currently being developed.

Disability Aboriginal
Services

The Adults with Physical and
Neurological disability (APN) Options
Coordination Program instigated the
establishment of an Indigenous
Options Coordination Unit with the
options coordination management at
Gilles Plains.

A working group, chaired by the
Disability Services Office with
representatives from Aboriginal
organisations and other Options
Coordination Programs, is developing
the operational framework of the APN
model to better support Aboriginal
clients through the Options
Coordination System.

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Right: Windamara dancers,
Millicent Naidoc,
July 2002



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

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Public Dental Service

The introduction of demand
management strategies within the
public dental system has successfully
reduced the number of people waiting
for services from 94 000 in February
2002 to 90 000 in June 2002.

A 10-year capital plan (2001/02  
2011/12) has been developed to
improve public dental clinics. A key
feature of this plan is the co-locating
of child and adult dental services into
larger clinics in accessible locations,
generally with other health services.

During 2001 02, new or upgraded
clinics were opened at Mt Barker,
Gawler and Kadina. Construction of a
new clinic at Victor Harbor has
commenced and funding for the new
Salisbury clinic has been approved.

Mental Health

Progress to redistribute resources in a
changing environment included:

  Implementation of an additional
Emergency Mental Health Team in
the Southern Metro area

  The Mental Health Unit and the
Resource Management and
Monitoring Branch are
working together to develop a
revised funding framework for
Mental Health Services that
reflects the change in service
direction and which enables
improvements to the
measurement of effectiveness
and efficiency

  Review of health service
agreements to reflect and
promote the achievement of
mental health performance
standards and reflect the
need for culturally appropriate
services in process

  The development of new
funding models for specialist
mental health services. Preliminary
planning has commenced between
Women s and Children s Hospital,
FAYS and Child and Adolescent
Mental Health Services to
maximise their service responses
for high risk young people and
their families, and for identified
young people entering and leaving
Boylan Ward. Trials will be held in
metropolitan and country locations
during 2002 03 and used to
develop agreed mechanisms for
participative consultation, planning

information exchange and case
management

  Completed development of the
Country Mental Health
Commitment Framework.

Country Mental Health

The country focus on mental health
promotion, prevention and early
intervention continued in 2001 02
with funding for a range of projects in
each region and the implementation
of mental health promotion training
modules for country health staff.

Social Justice and Country Division,
DHS, in collaboration with the
Supported Housing Unit, the Mental
Health Unit and regional service
providers has developed a number of
supported accommodation projects in
rural locations for people with
complex needs, including mental

illness and psychiatric disability.
These approaches involve the
establishment of a collaborative
service delivery partnership
comprising a social housing provider
(South Australian Housing Trust),
regional mental health services and a
non-government organisation
contracted to provide independent
living support. They focus on enabling
people with chronic, complex needs
to live independently in the
community with appropriate support.

Above: Naidoc flag raising

Left Top: Naidoc dancers

Left Minister Terry
Centre: Roberts at Naidoc

cuppa

Left Public Dental
Below: Service. Taken in

Special Needs
Clinic at Adelaide
Dental Hospital.
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DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

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Outcomes included improved quality
of life for consumers, reduced
demand for acute in-patient services
and improved housing stability.

Projects are about to commence in
Whyalla, and the South East with
further projects being developed in the
Riverland, Victor Harbor, Pt Lincoln,
Peterborough and the Wakefield region.

In partnership with the
Commonwealth the Primary Mental
Health Care Strategy, upskilling to
improve psychiatric emergency
intervention, was provided to General
Practitioners and other primary health
care providers in country regions.

Inpatient pilots to improve the quality
of mental health inpatient care in
country hospitals were established in
the Riverland, South East and Mid
North Regions. An inpatient pilot is
being developed in the Hills Mallee
Southern Region.

Other initiatives included:

  Increased funding to improve
mental health services to
Aboriginal people

  Increased funding for an additional
community mental health clinician
in each region

  Establishment of a mental health
consultation liaison service in
Gawler

  Additional funding for child and
adolescent mental health services
in the Eyre Region and Gawler.

Exceptional Needs Process

The Exceptional Needs Process (ENP)
works to find solutions for people
with very difficult issues or those
having extreme difficulty accessing
vital services from DHS. Examples
include individuals or families
experiencing three or more
conditions or for whom other issues
such as severe behavioural problems
are a barrier to receiving services.
The ENP has merged with the
Management Assessment Panel for
behaviourally disordered persons in

order to provide a more streamlined
and comprehensive response. The ENP
also has an Aboriginal Project Officer
position to ensure that the needs of
Aboriginal individuals and families are
sufficiently addressed in a culturally
relevant manner.

Referrals are made from DHS service
providers and other government
departments or services in the non-
government sector. Responsibility for
individual client management remains
with appropriate service providers.
However, the ENP will work to augment
and facilitate improved outcomes for the
clients referred, and effect system
changes that will strive to prevent the
need for further referrals of the same
type wherever possible. Resources
required to meet the needs of those
referred into the process will be drawn
from across the range of services
relevant to their needs.

45 enquiries have been received since
the ENP came into operation in
January 2002.

Regional Service
Planning Forums

The North West

A Central North West Regional
Managers Forum has been established
and brings together DHS service
providers in the Western metropolitan
area to work towards collaborative
service planning. Two areas identified
as priorities for collaboration are
services to Aboriginal people and
services to youth.

The North

A human services planning forum has
been established in the Northern
metropolitan area to:

  Promote leadership and advocacy
for the North

  Inform and influence the
membership of the forum with an
agenda that is closely aligned to
the five pillars of the government s
health and social agenda and
improve health status

  Develop, promote and maintain
an evidence base for identifying
and supporting northern
initiatives and priorities.

Membership of the forum includes
DHS, the Commonwealth Department
of Family and Community Services,
Commonwealth Department of
Transport and Regional Service,
Aged Care and Housing, community
representatives and the northern
region councils of Salisbury, Playford
and Gawler.

The South

A regional service provider planning
group has been operating in southern
metropolitan Adelaide for the past two
years. 20 agencies are now part of the
forum which provides both information
sharing and the chance to develop
collaborative approaches to shared
problems.

In 2001 02, 10 Aboriginal trainees
were employed across five agencies
and will be supported and shared
across the region.

Service Provision to
Refugees and New Arrivals

With the Commonwealth Government
introducing three year visas to
refugees released from immigration
detention and reception and
processing centres, a range of service
responses have been required by DHS
to ensure successful settlement and
health outcomes for refugees.

DHS has convened an interagency
group to coordinate service responses
to refugees holding temporary
protection visas. A range of non-
government, community and
government agencies have developed
strategies to efficiently and effectively
provide such services as emergency
housing, material and emergency
financial assistance, household
formation assistance and a
coordinated access to education and
employment programs with links to
DHS programs.

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Financial support services are offered
to refugees on temporary protection
visas through FAYS District Centres.
This initiative assesses individuals for
financial support to aid settlement
and provides them with information
on community resources.

During the year the SAHT provided
assistance to 467 singles and 94
families eligible for Temporary
Protection Visas. Since March 2000,
SAHT has assisted 1240 singles and
186 families to make the transition
into the community.

DHS funded the Australian Red Cross
to develop a guide to services for
refugees who hold temporary
protection visas and a resource kit for
service delivery agencies working with
these refugees. These were launched
in November and the guides have been
of great assistance to newly arrived
refugees as they are printed in Farsi,
Arabic and Dari in addition to English.

The Unaccompanied
Humanitarian Minors
Program

The Chief Executive, DHS was
delegated responsibility, by the
Federal Minister for Immigration, for
providing support and assistance to
refugee minors who arrive in
Australia unaccompanied by their
parents or guardians. FAYS
coordinates the Unaccompanied
Humanitarian Minors Program
providing services to these SA
children and young people.
Services include:

  A full alternative care program
incorporating the recruitment,
assessment, training and support
of carers who provide home based
foster care, supervision in group
homes and  on arrival 
accommodation

  On arrival responses

  Intensive supervision of
detainee minors released into
the community

  A recreation program

  Case management services
and independent living programs
to support Unaccompanied
Humanitarian Minors on
Temporary Protection Visas

  Assessment and case
planning services

  Community networking
and liaison.

A Memorandum of Understanding,
relating to child protection
notifications and child welfare issues,
was signed between the Department
of Immigration and Multicultural and
Indigenous Affairs and DHS. The SA
Child Abuse Report Line receives
notifications and assesses them in
line with procedural requirements.
Multi disciplinary child protection
assessment teams respond to
notifications.



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DHS is committed to the creation of a tolerant, fair and safe staff environment that
supports diversity and respects others  views, skills, experience, knowledge,
encourages debate and values difference of opinion.

STRENGTHENING
A CULTURE OF
WORKING
TOGETHER

Financial Services

DHS  Financial Services has
developed successful co-operative
arrangements with the Australian
Taxation Office to manage portfolio
goods and services tax risk. Further
development of the Financial Services
Intranet site has increased its
capacity to work across the portfolio
through improved information sharing
and resource availability. The
development of a quarterly statistical
report for the Department of Treasury
and Finance has provided a definitive
statistical base from which to work
together in planning and decision-
making at the portfolio level.

Working Party on
Innovations in Population
Health Education, Training
and Research

The Working Party on Innovations in
Population Health Education, Training
and Research was formed in 2001 as
part of the implementation of the DHS
Review into Public Health Education,
Training and Research completed by
Dr Peter Brennan. It includes
representatives from each university in
SA, DHS funded population health units
and the Commonwealth. The working
party has been meeting to identify
strategies to strengthen population
health education, training and research
in South Australia, which may include
the development of a model for formal
collaboration, such as a South
Australian Institute of Population Health.

Memoranda of
Understanding

DHS, in collaboration with the
Commonwealth Government, the SA
Divisions of General Practice Inc
(SADI), and the 14 Divisions of General
Practice in South Australia have
developed two Memoranda of
Understanding (MOU) to guide primary
health and community care initiatives.

Previously there have not been
coordinated responses or agreed
priorities between the parties in the
area of primary care and its interface
with general practitioners.

Workplans have been developed to
support the formal agreements and
a joint working group will monitor
each MOU.

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45

ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

Far left: Memorandum of
Understanding
Launch between
SA Divisions of
General Practice.
From L to R:
Minister for Health,
Dr Helena Williams,
then Chair of SADI
and Mr Jim Birch,
Chief Executive, DHS

The two MOUs are:

  DHS/Commonwealth MOU which
outlines primary care priorities for
a two-year period, building on
National Health Priority Areas, and
intended to align the primary care
activities of the two parties

  DHS/SADI/14 Divisions of General
Practice MOU which outlining
agreed objectives for DHS and
general practitioners in South
Australia for a one year period,
focussing on State specific
primary medical care issues and
initiatives with general
practitioners.

The Minister for Health and the Chief
Executive of SADI was to formally
launch the MOU between DHS/SADI/
14 Divisions of General Practice in
July 2002.

Youth Services Framework
and Children and Young
People s Policy

A DHS Child and Young People s
Policy was developed following
consultation with over 31 key
organisations, service providers and
community groups, and 28 key youth
groups (metropolitan and rural).

The Minister for Youth approved a
consultation draft  Youth Services
Framework  in June 2002 and a
consultation process with key
stakeholders was to be undertaken.

An important aspect of the Youth
Services Framework is the  Youth
Views Project . The project is funded
through the Human Services
Research and Innovative Program,
and was established to consult
young people and provide advice on

the DHS Children and Young People s
Policy. The ongoing participation of
young people in the policy
development process enabled them
to develop a youth friendly document
on the DHS Children and Young
People s Policy. The Youth Views
document will be launched in 2002
and will build on DHS commitment to
community participation in decision
making and is to facilitate youth
consultations on the proposed DHS
Youth Services Framework.

The Ministerial Advisory
Board on Ageing

This board advises government on
services which affect older people,
and on matters relating to policy,
research and planning.

During 2001 02, the Board carried out
two major tasks:

1. A review of the first five years of
Ageing   A Ten Year Plan looking
at changes since the plan was
developed.

Three main areas were identified
as priorities for action:

  The need to examine the
evolving political and economic
power and influence that older
people have and will continue
to have because of changing
demographics

  The need for far-sighted and
flexible workforce planning
and restructuring

  The impact of computerisation
and new technologies on the
way people live today.

2. SA community consultation in the
South Metropolitan Region. In
November 2001 the Home and
Community Care (HACC) Ministerial
Advisory Committee visited the
outer southern metropolitan area to
find out from community members
and local service providers what
they believed were the most
important issues and/or gaps in
services affecting the HACC target
populations in the area.

National Reconciliation
Week 2002

This year s National Reconciliation
Week (27 May   3 June 2002) was
based around the theme    Walking
the Talk . The State Government held
four major events:

  The official launch, held in
association with the South
Australian Reconciliation Committee

  A mobile container project, which
visited locations around the city
promoting reconciliation

  A  Picnic in the Park  for
Reconciliation Day

  The Reconciliation container
project focus in Hindmarsh
Square, Adelaide outside DHS.

The events reached the broadest
possible community within the
Adelaide metropolitan area and
provided an opportunity for the
community to learn and contribute
positively to the reconciliation process.

The official Reconciliation launch took
place during a morning peak hour at
the concourse of the Adelaide
Railway Station.

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The launch was a joint partnership
between the State Government and
the South Australian Reconciliation
Committee. Visual images and a
soundscape gave the presence of and
a connection to country. A symphony
of didgeridoo players created an
atmosphere that started the official
launch proceedings. Two Kaurna
elders extended greetings and
welcomed everyone to their country.
The Minister for Housing, Social
Justice, Status of Women and Youth;
Minister for Health and Minister
assisting the Premier in Social
Inclusion, and the Minister for
Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation
Officially launched the week. The
Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and
Reconciliation joined community
members to speak at the launch about
what Reconciliation Week means and
what needs to be done.

Supporting Aboriginal
Governance

Central to the achievement of
Aboriginal self management is the
building and support of Aboriginal
controlled governance structures.
These include Advisory Boards such
as the Aboriginal Health Advisory
Committees (AHAC), the Aboriginal
Youth Action Committees and Boards
of Management in Aboriginal
controlled organisations.

Aboriginal communities and board
members of Aboriginal controlled
organisations frequently express the
critical need for training and staff
development to enable those
representing their communities to be
fully cognisant of their roles, function
and responsibilities.

DHS released a discussion paper in
January 2002 exploring these matters
and presenting some model of
governance reform which would
strengthen the role and authority of
the AHAC. This has been
accompanied by the development of a
Memorandum of Understanding,
based on extensive consultation with

the Aboriginal community, Aboriginal
organisations and mainstream health
services which seeks to clarify the
AHAC s role vis-a-vis the regional
health boards and sets out the roles
and responsibility of each.

The Council of Aboriginal
Elders of SA

The Council of Aboriginal Elders of
South Australia, established during
the International Year of Older
Persons in 1999, has key
responsibility for advising government
authorities on the health and aged
care needs of frail aged indigenous
people. The Council has considered a
number of key issues including the
provision of services in rural SA and
the training needs of indigenous
workers in isolated areas.

Indigenous Family Violence

The Aboriginal Services Division has
been working across portfolios to
address the increasing prevalence of
indigenous family violence within
Aboriginal communities across the
State. The division has been actively
involved in a ministerial forum
convened by the Attorney-General s
Department and has been prominent
in developing a  State Collaborative
Approach  document.

During October 2001 the Indigenous
Family Violence Framework For
Action was signed by the State
Ministerial Forum on Domestic and
Family Violence. Progress on the
framework included discussions
about establishing an Indigenous
State Advisory Body, community
developed local action plans, across
portfolio commitment, ongoing
evaluation and review.

The first regional forum was
conducted in Ceduna in June 2002.

The family wellbeing program is being
piloted as a tool for addressing
indigenous family violence and it is
currently being evaluated.

Food Safety Reform

The Food Safety Reform Program
involves a number of government
departments (shared policy and
legislative responsibilities), local
government (as enforcers), the food
industry and the general public.
Communication and training
strategies and consultation processes
are in place to facilitate a culture of
working together.

Disability Services Direct
Funding Process

The Disability Services Office (DSO)
conducted a project to enable them to
become the funder of all disability
agencies. All service provision
agencies will now have funding and
service agreements with the DSO. This
will assist Options Coordination to
maintain their role as lead agencies
working with individual clients and
advising of the most appropriate
allocation of funding to services.

Mental Health

Mental health providers have been
encouraged to work together in the
provision of services by:

  The establishment of a Mental
Health Consumer and Carer
Partnership Framework

  The facilitation of a Mental Health
Consumers and Carers Steering
Committee and providing support
for them to strengthen participation
and improve consultation

  The institution of a structure for
the facilitation of Consumer and
Carer participation processes on
the Glenside Campus.



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DHS recognises that sound management of resources is fundamental to supporting
the delivery of quality services.

PROVIDING
SOUND
MANAGEMENT

Financial Services

Financial Services provides services
to the Portfolio that assist with good
management including support,
advice, and developing tools to
improve information databases and
financial systems. Typical initiatives
during 2001 02 included:

  Commencement of a taxation
services help desk to support and
advise portfolio agencies on
taxation matters

  Completion of the Treasury Data
Collection System Statements for
DHS, Aboriginal Housing
Authority, Whole of Health (WHO)
and Inter-Entity Eliminations

  Completion of unaudited half-year
financial statements for the first
time since the creation of the
Department

  Production of monthly monitoring
reports for Treasury from the
Hyperion system

  Production of Portfolio
Management Reports for Treasury,
Ministers and Executives.

Guidelines for Accessing
Legal Services in DHS

Following a review of the department s
use of legal services, guidelines were
developed to ensure that the
department efficiently manages the
use of legal resources. These include
the head of each division approving
requests for legal advice being made
by that Division, and a quality
assessment of the instructions being
made by the Manager of Parliamentary
and Legal Services prior to requests
being forwarded to the Crown
Solicitor s Office staff.

Procurement

In 2001 02 DHS  Strategic
Procurement Unit:

  Completed a pilot for a
procurement  reverse auction 
using the Internet which resulted
in a savings of 25% per annum on
the annual spend for examination
gloves. DHS was the first agency
in South Australia to pilot the
initiative

  Prepared and completed a Forward
Procurement Plan for the portfolio
highlighting the projected
spending on goods and services
over the next three years. The plan
is regarded as an important
planning tool for DHS and the
private sector

  Completed panel agreements with
over 70 organisations for medical

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DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

48

and surgical consumables and
orthopaedic implants. This will
generate better value for money
purchasing as well as reducing the
administrative costs associated
with tendering over the period

  Completed a Probity, Governance
and Duty of Care seminar for 160
procurement operatives across the
portfolio to enhance contracting
capability in these important areas

  Published procurement guidelines,
tools and procedures to enable
procurement operatives to
undertake their purchasing
requirements in a consistent and
value for money manner.

Monthly Management
Summary System

A major review of the monthly
management summary system, a
major source of corporate
information, recommended the
development of a single authoritative
source of management and
performance information
encompassing health, community
based and housing services. This
recommendation was subsequently
endorsed by DHS Executive. Work on
developing the first version of the
new reporting system, known as
Corporate Reporting and Indicators of
Summary Performance (CRISP) is
underway. The system is due for
release in the second half of 2003.

Spatial Analysis

Information Management Services has
established a dedicated spatial
analysis service in response to growing
demands from the department.
Services provided included:

  The production of hard copy maps
based on hospital, community
services and population based
data sets (including the Census)

  The development of online spatial
applications, such as e-Maps, an
application for producing
customised maps of the
department s and associated
private sector facilities.

Work in progress includes:

  The Service Finder, a facility
designed to help members of the
public to locate the nearest
providers of health and related
services (e.g. GPs, pharmacists
and dentists) through interactive
maps over the Internet

  An application for producing
customised Patient Origin maps
for hospitals (useful for defining
hospital catchment areas) and
Hospital Destination maps for
geographical areas (useful for
assessing the extent to which an
area is meeting the inpatient care
needs of its local community).

Knowledge Management

The Knowledge Space, an interactive
web site designed to support
knowledge management practices
across the department, was released
during 2001 02. Components include
the research and policy registers and
organisational profiles.

Intellectual Property

Appropriate management of the
intellectual property created by
employees of DHS and its agencies is
very important. DHS has developed a
draft Intellectual Property Policy for
consultation in order to provide
greater clarity in guiding the
management of intellectual property
within the human services portfolio.
DHS has also funded the position of a
Principal Project Officer (Intellectual
Property Management), situated
within Bio Innovation SA to advise
researchers and management in
teaching hospitals about intellectual
property management, protection and
commercialisation.

Service Excellence

The development of a DHS Service
Excellence Framework is a key
quality improvement initiative in the
DHS Strategic Plan. The framework
is a consolidated management tool
designed to assist DHS and funded
agencies to assess organisational

performance against prescribed
criteria and to identify areas for
further development or improvement.
The Service Excellence Council and
its subcommittees have been
established and roll out of the
framework across the central office
and some service providers has
begun.. Training has been provided
for nominated coordinators of the
self assessment processes.

The Service Excellence initiative
provides a valuable opportunity to
work with quality industry providers
used by many of our services such as
the Australian Council on Health Care
Standards, Quality Management
Services and the International
Standards Certification companies.
The framework will be implemented
across the portfolio in stages over the
next five years as a means of testing
the quality of our services.

Output reporting

During 2001 02 a reference group
comprising representatives from DHS
divisions, corporate areas and the
Department of Treasury and Finance
reviewed DHS  output reporting.

The project aimed to:

  Improve the reliability of output
costing

  Improve output performance
measures

  Apply a consistent methodology
for classifying outputs

  Clarify the relationship between
outputs and accountability/
management arrangements

  Meet the different information
needs of users both within and
outside the portfolio

  Ensure that output reporting is well
understood and owned by portfolio
management used in the portfolio s
management processes, including
strategic resource allocation.

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The Code of Fair
Information Practice

South Australian State Government
agencies are bound by Cabinet
Administrative Instruction 1/89  The
Information Privacy Principles .

In 2001, Commonwealth privacy
legislation was extended to cover the
private sector. The Privacy Amendment
(Private Sector) Act 2000 contains a set
of ten National Privacy Principles.

The Departmental Ethics and Privacy
Committee developed a Code of Fair
Information Practice (the Code) to
assure citizens that in providing
services and adopting information
technology the privacy of their
information is being protected.

DHS is providing both initiative and
leadership in this important area of
community and public concern. The
standards set in the Code are
consistent with the Privacy Act
thereby ensuring a seamless culture
of privacy protection across the public
and private health sectors in South
Australia. The Code contains 10
privacy principles providing a
framework for the appropriate
collection, use, storage, disclosure
and transfer of personal information.

Portfolio wide implementation of the
Code is continuing and information
and training are being delivered to
key sectors within DHS. The Code,
information sheets and links to
interstate privacy sites were added to
the DHS Intranet site during the year
and an information brochure on the
Code was approved for distribution to
all DHS staff.

The Research and
Evaluation Framework,
Social Research Agenda
and Research Register

The Research and Evaluation
Framework, Social Research Agenda
and Research Register are core tools
for evidence based decision making
across the portfolio.

The Research and Evaluation
Framework promotes a coordinated
approach to planning, researching
and evaluation.

The Social Research Agenda covers
health and human services research
and is intended to provide
departmental directions and priorities
for research.

The Research Register, launched on
the DHS Intranet in 2001, provides an
overview of all research being
undertaken across the portfolio,
thereby forming networks promoting
research collaboration.

Women s Health Centre and
Dale Street Redevelopment
of Port Adelaide
Community Health Service

Relocation of the Dale Street
Women s Health Centre was agreed,
and tenders were let for construction
of a new building adjacent to the
Port Adelaide Community Health
Service. DHS commenced a
feasibility study into the
expansion of the Port Adelaide
Community Health Service to
accommodate an increased South
Australian Dental Service facility
and several clinics run by The
Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

Metropolitan
Domiciliary Care

The amalgamation of the existing
four domiciliary care services in
metropolitan Adelaide on 1 July 2002
will provide consistent client service
improvements. Intake processes,
continuity of care with public
hospitals and better working
relationships with other agencies will
improve the ability of Metropolitan
Domiciliary Care to meet client needs.

Implementation of the
Home and Community Care
Minimum Data Set

South Australian Home and
Community Care (HACC) funded
agencies have now provided data for
five quarterly collections. Data was
received from over 80% of all HACC

funded agencies in South Australia
(95% of the quantum of HACC funds
allocated).

Analysis of the data has begun and
this will enable better planning and
targeting of new services, and
performance monitoring for
established services. Reports are being
developed to feedback to agencies and
further training for agencies will be
developed according to need.

Aboriginal Health Workers
Workforce Development
and Aboriginal Health
Workers Empowerment

An Aboriginal Advisory Committee
has been working on a strategy to
implement three key
recommendations of the report
 Future Pathways, Aboriginal Health
Workers in South Australia , released
in December 1999:

  Training and curriculum   present
and future

  Status (salary structures and
career pathways)

  Support.

An Aboriginal Health Workers State
Conference was held in November
2001 and attended by 150 Aboriginal
Health Workers who endorsed the
Business Plan, Vision and definition of
the role of Aboriginal Health Workers.

The Equal Opportunity Commission
approved DHS  request for an
exemption from the Act so as to
only employ Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander People as Aboriginal
Health Workers.

Above: Aboriginal Health
Workers Workforce
Development and
empowerment.
Pika Wiya Unique
Centre of Learning
Stage 1 launch.
From L to R:
Brian Dixon,
Executive Director,
Aboriginal Services
Division,
Charmaine Hull,
Coordinator,
Pika Wiya
Learning Centre,
Hon Lea Stevens
MP, Minister for
Health, Minister
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DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

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The recently released  Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Health
Workforce Draft National Strategic
Framework  recommends that each
State and Territory establish their own
Aboriginal Health Worker (AHW)
Association. Funding for the
establishment of AHW Associations
will largely be met by the
Commonwealth but it is expected that
States and Territories will fund
ongoing running costs after the first
three years. Aboriginal Services
Division is writing an application for
funding to establish the Association.

Medical Research

DHS conducted a Medical Research
Roundtable in March 2002, bringing
together key people from teaching
hospitals, universities and industry
with people with an interest in
medical research from DHS and

other relevant areas. Issues raised
included the strategic use of DHS
resources to facilitate medical
research, strategies to promote
collaboration and coordination,
and attract and retain quality
researchers in South Australia.
DHS is undertaking preliminary work
to address issues raised through
the development of a Medical
Research Strategy.

Professional Services  
Nursing

DHS places great emphasis on nurse
recruitment and retention.

$1 million was allocated in the
2001 02 budget to support nursing
recruitment and retention strategies,
allowing the following programs to be
established:

  Clinical Refresher and Re-entry
Programs for Registered and
Enrolled Nurses in metropolitan
and country areas including
Whyalla, Riverland and the South
East designed to assist nurses to
return to the workforce and
update their skills in acute care

  Clinical Nursing Information
Systems Data Base Management
  staffing ratios for inpatient units

  Post graduate education
scholarships

  Support for Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander nursing students

  Clinical Leadership Program

  Alternative models for
undergraduate training project

  Creation of forty additional places
in the undergraduate nursing
(Pre-Registration) program.

DHS provides leadership to the
nursing profession through developing
policies and project/research
initiatives that improve nursing
services. Advice on professional,
management and industrial issues is
provided to government and industry.

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Above: Aboriginal Health
Workers

Far right:
Nursing Excellence Award
winners are:

from back left to right:
Nicholas Proctor, Nursing
Education; Gerda Roda-Allen,
Residential and Aged Care
(RN), Marilyn Sherry,
Residential and Aged Care
(EN), centre   Joylene
Morcom, Metropolitan Acute
Care (RN); Ros Pierce,
Aboriginal Nurse; Suzanne
Templeton, Community (RN);
Annie Glover, Rural and
Remote Care (EN); Julia
Lohmeyer, Rural and Remote
Care (RN);

front left to right:
Annette Summers on behalf of
SImon Stewart, Nursing
Research; Lisa Brown-
Campbell, Community (EN);
Gloria Kerr, Metropolitan
Acute Care (EN); Judi Brown,
Nursing Leadership

The Nursing Office is working with
the Australian Nursing Federation,
peak nursing bodies and the
profession through the Nursing
Summit on Recruitment and Retention
to establish a strategic nursing
recruitment and retention plan for the
next five years.

Phase Two of the Nurse Practitioner
project is complete. Professional
Services   Nursing will continue to
work with all relevant organisations
and individuals to review and monitor
its implementation and effectiveness.

Further initiatives commenced during
2001 02 to support nurses include:

  The  Enrolled Nursing Cadetship
Program  for rural and remote
areas which assists students
whilst they undertake their TAFE
training by providing part-time
employment in their local
community. Thirty-five health units
and forty-three cadets are
participating in this program and
three of the cadets are Indigenous
Australians

  The Nurse Marketing campaign
has been enhanced through the
Schools Speaking Programs
offered for the first time in the
2002 school year. The program
markets nursing as an exciting and
worthwhile career choice and
offers students the chance to hear
about the real life experiences of
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ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

51

  The Job Shadowing Program for
school leavers is also being
offered this school year.
Developed in consultation with
school counsellors and nurses, it
allows school students to work
alongside nurses in metropolitan
public hospitals

  Country regions have been
specifically catered for through the
Vocational Education Training in
Schools Program (Nursing
Pathway Project) which promotes
nursing as a career to secondary
school students whilst staying
within their community

  Support for the Nursing Excellence
Awards, which this year attracted
over 230 nominations.

Disability Services
Performance Management

The Disability Services Office (DSO)
has implemented a reporting and
performance monitoring system for
DSO funding and service agreements.
The technology infrastructure will
improve access to information to
support disability services and
strategic, operational and
management decision-making.

Mental Health

The following have been undertaken
to increase sound management of
mental health services:

  The development and current
implementation of clear protocols
to govern access to, and utilisation
of, psychiatric acute beds

  The completion of work regarding
appropriate design features for
Mental Health within emergency
departments and emergency
extended care units at FMC, RAH
and LMHS

  The completion of the restructure
of mental health providers from
regionally-based to mental health
divisions within mainstream
health units, accountable through
CEOs to Boards.

Supported Residential
Facilities

A Supported Residential Facilities
(SRF) workshop was held in February
2002 to bring proprietors/managers up
to date with government policies and
directions relevant to the SRF industry
and to encourage them to express
views on how DHS might best assist
the industry and its clients.

DHS commenced a research project
on rooming houses and SRF called
 The sector, its clientele and its
future . The aim is to map and profile
the existing stock of SRF, profile the
residents of these facilities, and
assess the future viability of the
sector and the appropriateness of the
existing facilities to the housing and
support needs of the residents.

DHS has prepared and distributed a
SRF newsletter focussing on issues
relating to the SRF industry to all
facilities, community centres, support
service providers and a variety of
other relevant stakeholders.

A SRF Residents  Rights Project was
undertaken to enhance:

  Residents  understanding of their
rights, the ability to exercise them
and the responsibilities which
accompany them

  Staff and proprietors 
understanding of residents  rights

  Local authorised officers 
understanding of their role in
promoting and protecting
residents  rights.

Crisis Accommodation
Program

The Crisis Accommodation Program
provides funding to accommodate
homeless people and appropriate
housing services.

At 30 June 2002, 33 projects were at
various stages of development
including a number of significant
projects supporting vulnerable adults
under the Inner City Services
Framework. Examples include the
Stabilisation Facility for people with
alcohol or other substance misuse
problems, and the redevelopment of
the St Vincent de Paul s Night Shelter
for Homeless Men at Whitmore
Square, Adelaide.



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PROMOTING INDEPENDENCE:
DISABILITY ACTION PLANS
FOR SA
 Promoting Independence   Disability Action Plans for SA  was launched
in November 2000. It provides a policy framework for developing disability
action plans, ensuring that all SA government funded programs and services
are inclusive and accessible to people with disabilities meeting the
requirements of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and
the SA Equal Opportunity Act 1984.

DHS  progress report is as follows:

Outcome 1

Portfolios and their agencies ensure accessibility to their services to people with disabilities

  DHS  key strategy to achieve this outcome is the development of a draft DHS Disability Action Plan. The plan aims to set directions for
human service providers to:

  Redesign policies, programs and facilities to ensure that mainstream services are accessible for people with disabilities

  Eliminate practices that are discriminatory

  Increase employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

  The  Equity of Access to Health Services for People with Disabilities: Policy Statement and Strategic Directions  was finalised in
September 2001. Priority strategies included the development of the DHS Disability Action Plan (including relevant services provided on
contract to DHS by external agencies) and the development of similar plans by all human service provider units. This document will be
made available in a variety of accessible formats including large print, Braille, audiocassette, and e-text. A plain English summary of the
document will also be made available

  The Disability Services Planning and Funding Framework 2000 03 provides a guide to the planning and purchasing of disability services.
This framework complemented the development of the DHS Disability Action Plan

  The SAHT Disabled Modifications Policy has been finalised and was launched in August 2001 assisting DHS to provide equitable and
consistent services in response to customer needs

  A number of strategies have been implemented by DHS to support the government s  Strategy for the employment of people with
disabilities in the South Australian public sector  including:

  Dissemination of information sheets from Office for the Commissioner for Public Employment about the strategy to all managers and
agencies

  Incorporation of people with disabilities into the policy on managing diversity

  Establishment of a process for short term vacancies to be put forward to the Disability Recruitment Coordination Service for
consideration by people with disabilities

  Encouragement of management to recruit people with disabilities as trainees, and provision of advice about access to available
support services through the Disability Recruitment Coordination Service.

  All new capital works projects, including sites under redevelopment that are being managed by Asset Services within the department are
required to comply with the Disability Discrimination Act. For existing sites not undergoing redevelopment Asset Services have developed a
progressive compliance program which allocates funds on a priority needs basis.

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Outcome 4

Portfolios and their agencies provide opportunities for consultation with people with disabilities in decision making
processes regarding service delivery and in the implementation of complaints and grievance mechanisms

  Consultation with people with
disabilities is another key principle
of the draft DHS Disability Action
Plan, as is the provision of
appropriate access for people with
disabilities to complaint handling
procedures within services and
access to independent complaint
authorities

  The policy development process
for the Equity of Access to Health
Services for People with
Disabilities: Policy Statement and
Strategic Directions involved
extensive metropolitan and
country consultation

  The development process for the
draft DHS Disability Action Plan
included representation of people
with disabilities on the Steering
Committee.

Outcome 3

Portfolios and their agencies deliver advice or services to people with disabilities with awareness and understanding of
issues affecting people with disabilities

  Demonstrated awareness and
understanding by staff and
volunteers of their obligations
under the Disability Discrimination
Act and the needs of people with
disabilities are key priority areas
for action in the draft DHS

Disability Action Plan. To achieve
this outcome, a training and
resource framework will be
developed to educate and train
staff and volunteers in targeted
areas of responsibility

  DHS will design an information
kit to use across DHS services
and programs.

Outcome 2

Portfolios and their agencies ensure information about their services and programs is inclusive of people
with disabilities

  Improved information provision
and communication strategies are
key priority areas for action in the
draft DHS Disability Action Plan

  DHS divisions will establish
policies and protocols in relation
to equitable access to information
and communication strategies
regarding human services in
South Australia

  All DHS and service provider
publications will be available in
various formats

  All electronic information and
communication provision will be
accessible to people with a range
of disabilities.



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Disability Action Plan
Forum

In February 2002, 90 participants
attended a forum supporting
Promoting Independence: Disability
Action Plans for SA. The forum aimed
to engage, motivate and inform key
representatives from all South
Australian Government portfolios on
the process of developing and refining
Disability Action Plans. It also
enabled participants to hear from
experts in this field and convey this
information back to their respective
portfolios and relate it to
implementation of progress reports.

Outcome 5

Each portfolio Chief Executive will ensure that their portfolio has met the requirements of the Disability Discrimination
Act 1992 and the Equal Opportunity Act 1984.

DHS is the lead agency on the
implementation of this policy and as
such, convenes an across government
implementation reference group to
monitor and reports annually to the
Senior Management Council (SMC) on
progress.

Terms of reference for this group,
which has representatives from the
eleven portfolios, include to:

  Support the implementation of
Promoting Independence with a
particular focus on the
development of disability
action plans

  Develop a whole of government
reporting framework to benchmark
achievements and initiatives

  Promote awareness and systemic
improvements in the accessibility
of government services to people
with disabilities

  Identify issues related to the
implementation of Promoting
Independence e.g. barriers/
opportunities/successes.

The SMC, comprising the Chief
Executives of all State Government
portfolios, reports to the Minister for

Social Justice on the progress of
implementing the policy.

DHS has established a Reference
Group for the coordination,
monitoring and reporting of the
portfolio s own Disability Action Plan.

The first implementation progress
reports was forwarded to the
Minister for Disability Services by
SMC in November 2001. Chief
Executives also provided progress
reports on the implementation of the
policy within their Annual Reports.D

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SOUTH AUSTRALIAN
HEALTH COMMISSION
ANNUAL REPORT
Roles and Responsibilities

The SA Health Commission (SAHC)
has the powers, rights, duties and
functions set out in the SAHC Act
1976. Its functions under the SAHC
Act, which are advisory, are set out in
Section 16 (1).

Those functions are:

(a) to the extent determined by the
Minister, to provide advice to the
Minister on the performance of
functions conferred on the
Minister under this Act or any
other Act;

(b) at the request of the Minister, to
provide information to the
Minister on the requirements of
the public, or any section of the
public, in the field of health or
health services, or to assist in the
planning of health services;

(c) to develop, foster or promote
proper standards of public and
environmental health in the State;

(d) to the extent determined by the
Minister, to plan, initiate, carry
out, support or promote programs
or activities designed to improve
or promote public and
environmental health;

(e) to increase public awareness of
such matters relating to health as
appear to be appropriate to the
Commission or as are designated
by the Minister;

(f) to assist the Minister in the
dissemination of knowledge in the
field of public health to the
advancement of the public interest;

(g) at the request of the Minister, to
investigate and report on any
matter relevant to public or
environmental health or to health
services within the State;

(h) at the request of the Minister, to
conduct inquiries into any aspect
of public or environmental health,
the provision of health services or
the care of the public (or of any
section of the public);

(i) to provide advice to the Minister
on action to be taken to prevent or
avert the spread of diseases that
are a danger to the public or on
other matters relevant to the
protection or promotion of public
health;

(j) at the request of the Minister, to
provide advice to the Minister on
the administration of any provision
of this Act, or of any designated
Act, or on the exercise or
performance of powers under this
Act or any designated Act;

(k) at the request of the Minister, to
provide advice on any other matter
in relation to which the Minister
considers that the advice of the
Commission should be available;

(l) to carry out other functions
assigned to the Commission by
this or under this or any other Act,
or by the Minister;

(m) to carry out other functions as may
be necessary, expedient or
incidental to the foregoing.

The Commission has the powers
necessary or expedient for, or
incidental to, the performance of
its functions.

The Commission may delegate its
powers and functions pursuant to
Section 19 of the SAHC Act.

In the exercise of its functions, the
SAHC is:

  subject to the control and direction
of the Minister

  required to seek to coordinate its
activities with DHS   the activities
of which are outlined in this
Annual Report.

The Commission also has certain
specific powers and functions in the
area of public health pursuant to:

  The Food Act, 1985

  The Public and Environmental
Health Act, 1982

  The Radiation Protection and
Control Act, 1982

Members of the
Commission

Current members include:

  Mr Jim Birch, Chair (appointed
11 April 2002)

  Professor Brendon Kearney
(appointed 1 December 1998)

  Ms Roxanne Ramsey (appointed
25 July 1999)

  Mr Brian Dixon (appointed
12 April 2001)

Ms Christine Charles, Chairman
(16 April 1998   8 March 2002)

Mr James Davidson
(25 July 1999  24 April 2002)



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AND PRIVACY COMMITTEE
The Departmental Ethics and Privacy
Committee (DEPC) was established in
August 2000. It provides
recommendations to DHS Senior
Executive on matters requiring ethical
consideration including those which
have policy, decision-making and
practice implications, and addresses
information privacy management and
practice issues, both ethical and
operational.

The DEPC comprises members who
are internal and external to the
department. People are appointed to
the Committee based on their
expertise and as such do not
represent the organisation/institution
that employs them.

The DEPC has been instrumental in
the initiation and development of the
DHS Code of Fair Information
Practice. The DEPC has also provided
advice on ethical issues and privacy
policy more generally and explored
information privacy aspects of data
collections and linkages. The DEPC
assessed research protocols which
use departmental data until a
standing sub-committee, the Human
Research Ethics Sub-Committee
became operational.

Human Research Ethics
Sub-committee

The Human Research Ethics Sub-
Committee (HRESC), a sub-committee
of the DEPC, was established in April
2001 and reports directly to them on a
regular basis.

The HRESC receives, reviews and
recommends approval or non approval
of research, evaluation and
consultation initiated and completed
by departmental staff or external
researchers seeking access to
departmental data or clients. The
Committee is fully constituted with
the National Health and Medical
Research Council (NHMRC) and
reviews proposals in accordance with
the National Statement on Ethical
Conduct in Research Involving
Humans (1999) and the DHS  Code of
Fair Information Practice.

In accordance with the National
Statement the HRESC has members
who are both internal and external
to DHS. People are appointed to
the committee based on their
expertise and, as such, do not
represent the organisation/industry
that employs them.

The Committee, since its
establishment, has considered thirty-
one proposals. The research
submitted has explored a wide variety
of issues, from homelessness and
teenage pregnancy to broad
epidemiological issues such as
diabetes and the prevalence of
cancer. Many national studies have
been reviewed by the Committee.



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

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Hospital Activity Statistics (1)

1992 93 1993 94 1994 95 1995 96 1996 97 1997 98 1998 99 1999 00 2000 01 2001 02*

Average daily available beds (2) 5119 5060 4946 4874 4725 4696 4626 4566 4600 4573

Occupancy rate (3) 72% 75% 70% 71% 73% 73% 72% 72% 73% 73.9%

Admissions

Overnight Stay patients 193 480 191 104 191 811 191 007 186 820 190 626 189 545 184 970 179 874 179 679

Same day patients 81 579 93 471 108 243 115 725 124 852 135 976 146 028 154 407 156 029 158 977

Total admissions 275 059 284 575 300 054 306 732 311 672 326 602 335 573 339 377 335 903 338 656

Admissions/1000 population (4) 189 194 203 208 210 220 226 227 224 223

% Same day admissions 30% 33% 36% 38% 40% 42% 44% 45% 46% 47.0%

Average length of stay (5) 5.0 4.9 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.1 4.0 4.0 4.1 4.1

Occupied bed days 1 386 235 1 384 989 1 327 567 1 334 187 1 336 473 1 342 230 1 356 240 1 347 819 1 387 032 1 392 465

Non-inpatients (6)

Casualty 371 046 377 433 414 369 435 378 438 103 455 659 461 256 463 044 472 067 468 896

Outpatients (7) 1 299 362 1 323 714 1 356 247 1 384 580 1 389 401 1 453 209 1 418 887 1 483 803 1 471 176 1 472 502

* Some data was missing for Torrens House at the time of publication. Estimates were made and the overall effect is
not material.

(1) This table contains data for all recognised public hospitals, including the Pregnancy Advisory Centre and Torrens House.

(2) The average number of beds available for use by patients in the course of the year.

(3) The ratio of occupied beds divided by annual available beds. This excludes day only patients treated in designated day
only facilities.

(4) Population figures represent the mid-year resident population of South Australia as estimated by the Australian Bureau of
Statistics for that financial year.

(5) The average number of days all admitted patients spent in hospital, including day only patients.

(6) The increases in non-admitted patient activity reflect, in part, trends in the use of these services and, in part, the results by
DHS to improve the quality of data reported.

It should be noted that the series has changed from reporting attendances at outpatient and casualty clinics (for the years
1990 91 to 1992 93) to occasions of service at each clinic (from 1993 94).

(7) Excludes private outpatients.

Source: Monthly Management Summary System

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RESOURCE SUMMARY
Employment numbers
EXECUTIVE &amp; NON EXECUTIVE EMPLOYMENT as at 30 JUNE 2002
Head Count
STREAM Ongoing Contract Contract Casual Total

Short Term Long Term

Classification Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES
Trainees 14 30 44 14 30 44
ASO1 15 131 146 8 27 35 3 3 23 161 184
ASO2 66 259 325 22 49 71 1 1 88 309 397
ASO3 53 161 214 3 21 24 56 182 238
ASO4 132 180 312 13 22 35 1 1 146 202 348
ASO5 122 140 262 26 29 55 1 1 148 170 318
ASO6 84 95 179 6 22 28 1 2 3 91 119 210
ASO7 42 32 74 4 6 10 1 1 47 38 85
ASO8 29 21 50 4 8 12 2 1 3 35 30 65
MAS1 1 2 3 2 2 3 2 5
MAS2 27 26 53 1 1 27 27 54
MAS3 6 3 9 3 3 9 3 12
Total
Administrative
Services 577 1050 1627 105 215 320 4 5 9 1 3 4 687 1273 1960

OPERATIONAL
SERVICES
OPS1 11 4 15 1 4 5 33 40 73 45 48 93
OPS2 53 82 135 27 52 79 1 1 21 35 56 102 169 271
OPS3 90 51 141 11 22 33 101 73 174
OPS4 33 28 61 8 7 15 41 35 76
OPS5 39 6 45 1 1 39 7 46
Total Operational
Services 226 171 397 47 86 133 1 0 1 54 75 129 328 332 660

PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
PSO1 62 182 244 21 77 98 1 1 8 8 83 268 351
PSO2 27 71 98 4 10 14 1 1 2 32 82 114
PSO3 27 47 74 1 1 28 47 75
PSO4 4 6 10 2 2 2 2 6 8 14
PSO5 2 2 2 0 2
MPS1 1 1 0 1 1
MPS3 2 1 3 2 1 3
Total Professional
Services 124 308 432 26 89 115 3 2 5 0 8 8 153 407 560

TECHNICAL
SERVICES
TGO0 1 1 1 0 1
TGO2 3 2 5 3 2 5
TGO3 5 5 5 0 5
TGO4 2 2 2 0 2
Total Technical
Services 11 2 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 2 13



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

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EXECUTIVE &amp; NON EXECUTIVE EMPLOYMENT as at 30 JUNE 2002 (continued)
Head Count
STREAM Ongoing Contract Contract Casual Total

Short Term Long Term

Classification Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

EXECUTIVES
EL1 2 2 2 0 2
EL3 1 1 1 0 1
EXA 10 3 13 10 3 13
EXB 1 1 8 9 17 9 9 18
EXC 5 2 7 5 2 7
EXD 2 1 3 2 1 3
EXF 1 1 1 0 1
Total Executives 3 0 3 1 0 1 26 15 41 0 0 0 30 15 45

Executive Right
to Further
Appointment
Tenured 3 3 17 10 27

Untenured 1 1 9 5 14

OTHER
LE5 1 1 0 1 1
President
Guardianship Board 1 1 1 0 1
Public Advocate 1 1 1 0 1
Ministerial Officers 4 3 7 4 3 7
RN1 2 2 0 2 2
RN2 6 6 2 2 0 8 8
RN3A 2 4 6 1 1 2 5 7
RN3B 1 1 0 1 1
RN3C 1 1 0 1 1
RN4 1 1 1 0 1
RN5 1 1 1 0 1
RN5D 1 1 0 1 1
MD2 3 4 7 3 4 7
MD3A 2 2 0 2 2
MD3C 1 1 1 0 1
MDP3 1 1 0 1 1
MDP4 4 4 0 4 4
HAE1 1 1 1 1 0 2 2
HAE2 3 1 4 4 4 3 5 8
HAE3 1 1 3 3 2 2 2 4 6
HAE4 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 3
GSE1 7 7 0 7 7
GSE3 1 1 2 1 1 2
GSE4 1 1 1 0 1
GSE6 2 2 2 0 2
MET11 1 1 1 0 1
Total Other 15 34 49 7 18 25 2 1 3 2 0 2 26 53 79
GRAND TOTAL 956 1565 2521 186 408 594 36 23 59 57 86 143 1235 2082 3317

Notes: The figures do not include employees on Leave without pay in June 2002
The figures include Office of the Public Advocate, Guardianship Board, Management Assessment Panel.



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% of employees with
a documented individual
development plan which
was either implemented

or revised during the
last 12 months.

% of training
expenditure

relative to total
remuneration costs.

Number of employees
enrolled since July 1 in
a qualification (or a unit

from a qualification)
from an accredited
training package.

Agency investment in
leadership and
management

development (2001  
2002 benchmark of 2%
determined by Senior
Management Group).

99/00 00/01 01/02 Target 99/00 00/01 01/02 Target 99/00 00/01 01/02 Target 99/00 00/01 01/02 Target

02/03 02/03 02/03 02/03

Executives

Senior Managers *

Middle Managers **

First Line
Supervisors ***

Others

TOTAL 25% 20% 19% 7.2% 8.3% 6.3% 224 1.46% 4.2%

* Senior Managers includes all AS07 and AS08 and equivalent, irrespective of any supervisory role

** Middle Managers includes all AS05 and AS06 and equivalent, irrespective of any supervisory role

*** First Line Supervisors includes AS03 and AS04 and equivalent, irrespective of any supervisory role

  It is not possible to differentiate between Executives, Senior Managers, Middle Managers, and First Line Supervisors at this time.
  It is not possible to identify targets for 2002 03

Human Resource,
Leadership and
Management Development

The Commissioner s Guidelines for
Planned Human Resource
Development in the South Australian
Public Service (July 2001) provide
principles on which SA public sector
agencies can base the development
of policies and practices to ensure
the planned provision of human
resource development:

1. Human resource development is
approached strategically

2. Employee skill profile is known
and skill gaps are identified

3. A Human Resource Development
Plan exists

4. Development plans exist for
individual employees

5. Development opportunities are
equitable and accessible

6. Agency investment in Human
Resource development is
evaluated

The following paragraphs describe
how DHS has followed these
principles:

Human resource development is
approached strategically. Managers
and employees determine individual
skill development needs through the
strategic and business planning
processes and development plans and
budgets are built at the local level.

A Human Resource Development Plan
for DHS exists. DHS is redesigning
and redeveloping both policy and
procedure for performance
management. Appropriate budgets
are established to support ongoing

development for employees, and
expenditure is consistent with the
public sector benchmarks.

Development plans exist for individual
employees where managers are
utilising performance management
and development at the local level.
A human resource plan is developed
annually by Corporate Services.
Development opportunities are
equitable and accessible.

DHS provides management and
development opportunities through
several strategies including:

  specific leadership and
development programs;

  leadership forums on specific
topics;

  leadership forums on
organisational/ agency issues; and

  policies to guide and inform
training and education support.

Extent to which DHS has achieved the principles is illustrated by the following table:

PSM Act Employees



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

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Qualifications gained by our workforce from undertaking the Training Packages include:
Qualification No. of people

Certificate IV in Assessment and Workplace Training 11

Certificate III in Community Services (Youth Work) 61

Certificate III in Community Services (Community Work) 1

Certificate IV in Community Services (Social Housing) 14

Diploma in Community Services (Social Housing) 3

Sub Total 79

Certificate III In Business (Office Administration) 37

Certificate IV in Business (Office Administration) 10

Diploma of Business (Administration) 2

Sub Total 49

Certificate IV in Government 12

Sub Total 12

Accredited Training not part of Training Packages includes:
Qualification No. of people

Certificate IV in Project Management 17

Certificate IV in Building 15

Certificate IV in Learning 1

Certificate IV in Interagency Practice 40

Sub Total 73

TOTAL 224

Leave Management
1999 2000 2000 2001 2001 02

Average number of sick leave days taken per FTE 7 6.5 6.3

Average number of family carer leave days taken per FTE 0.15 0.17 0.16

DHS training and development
initiatives for Public Sector
Management Act employees

Workforce Planning Strategy

DHS is developing a workforce
planning strategy which will provide
the workforce related information
required to manage risk, develop
strategies for recruitment,
redeployment, retraining and
retirement, and the capacity to
achieve current and future objectives.

A cross-divisional workforce officers
group guides the development of:

  A workforce planning policy and
framework which will drive
workforce profiling, demand and
supply modelling

  The analysis of issues which will
impact on workforce availability

  The development of a workforce
planning model to achieve
portfolio strategic goals

  An annual portfolio workforce
plan report.

Leadership Development Programs

  Thirty-five DHS staff participated
in the LeadershipSA program
coordinated by the Office for the
Commissioner for Public
Employment during 2001 02

  DHS provides a range of
management and leadership
programs, and opportunities
including the customised
Leadership Advantage Program in
which seventy-nine portfolio
executive level staff participated

  The Influential Leadership
Program, designed by the

Workforce Development Centre for
DHS staff, had thirty-four
participants and the DHS
Management Program, also
designed by the Workforce
Development Centre had fourty-
seven participants.

Implementation of
Training Packages

The following Training Packages apply
across the portfolio:

  Community Services
Training Package

  Public Services Training Package

  Business Services
Training Package

  Assessment and
Workplace Training



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Workforce Diversity

Achievements during 2001 02
included:

  DHS employees actively
participated in the Commissioner
for Public Employment s diversity
survey

  Continuing implementation of the
Human Resource Management
System (HRMS).

Human Resource Management
System (HRMS)

This HRMS project covers all 30 000
employees across the portfolio. This
project, to be completed during
2002 03, will facilitate the capture of
diversity data. Strategies have been
developed to initiate information
collection. By 30 June 2002 all
employees of the major metropolitan
health units were being paid by the

Complete Human Resource
Information System (CHRIS) with
DHS central in the process of being
implemented. By the end of the
financial year 2002 03 it is
anticipated that all employees of the
portfolio including country regions
will be on the common payroll/human
resource information system, CHRIS.
This will allow workforce profiling of
all DHS employees and enable
enhanced workforce planning across
the system.

The following table details DHS Workforce Diversity:

Total Female % of Number of Number of Number of
employees  employees employees employees employees employees

who are identifying  with a accessing
female as indigenous  permanent family related

disability workplace
policies

Executives 45 15 33 n/a n/a n/a

Senior Managers* 235 107 46 n/a n/a n/a

Middle Managers** 725 412 57 n/a n/a n/a

First line supervisors*** 1197 762 64 n/a n/a n/a

Others 1115 786 70 n/a n/a n/a

TOTAL 3317 2082 63 n/a n/a n/a

* Senior Managers includes all AS07 and AS08 and equivalent, irrespective of any supervisory role

** Middle Managers includes all AS05 and AS06 and equivalent, irrespective of any supervisory role

*** First Line Supervisors includes AS03 and AS04 and equivalent, irrespective of any supervisory role

DHS Workforce Age profile:

Age Group (years) Number of Employees % of all % of % of
(Persons) agency Australian Australian

 employees Workforce*  Population*

Male Female Total

15 19 2 12 14 0.42 8.0 7.0

20 24 55 155 210 6.33 11.4 7.1

25 29 106 270 376 11.34 11.9 7.5

30 34 135 217 352 10.61 11.9 7.5

35 39 134 256 390 11.76 11.8 7.6

40 44 193 313 506 15.26 12.3 7.6

45 49 225 343 568 17.13 11.5 7.0

50 54 210 280 490 14.77 9.9 6.6

55 59 130 165 295 8.89 6.7 5.1

60 64 39 61 100 3.01 3.1 4.1

65+ 6 10 16 0.48 1.6 12.5

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Equal Opportunity
Employment Programs

DHS has continued its commitment to
employing and promoting on merit
regardless of race, gender, sexuality,
marital status, pregnancy, physical or
intellectual impairment.

However, DHS has also continued to
explore appropriate strategies to
provide opportunities to increase the
number of people employed from
targeted population groups, e.g.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders,
employed within the portfolio.

During the year, DHS sought, and was
granted by the Equal Opportunity
Tribunal, orders for exemption where,
under the provisions of section 92 of
the Equal Opportunity Act 1984, a
three year exemption is granted to
DHS to appoint only Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islanders to Aboriginal
Health Worker positions in South
Australia. The Workforce
Management Branch is committed to
working with Aboriginal Services
Division in achieving our
commitments in the DHS Statement
of Reconciliation to actively work

towards increasing the number of
Aboriginal people employed within
the Portfolio and the number in
decision making positions.

State Government Youth
Recruitment Initiative

DHS supports young South
Australians through work experience,
ongoing employment or returning to
tertiary study. Commitment to the
Graduate employment program has
continued to grow across a broad
range of disciplines:

2001 02 Graduate Program
Discipline No. of Graduates

Library 1

Project 6

Human Resources 1

Social Worker/ Psychologist 10

Finance/ Economics 5

Professional 3

Technical 2

Research 1

Scientific 1

Policy 3

Information Technology 3

TOTAL 36

Non Graduate (Recruit) Program Trainees
Discipline No. of Graduates

Clerical 66

Finance 2

Information Technology 5

Horticultural 2

Dental Assistants 37

Youth Worker 13

Health Practice   Clerical 19

Community Support Workers 1

TOTAL 145*

* Of these 101 work in the Metropolitan area and 44 work in the country locations.



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Fraud

Two instances of suspected fraud
were reported during the year. The
first related to the procurement of
services and has been referred to the
Anti-Corruption Branch for
investigation. The second, related to
electronic funds transfers which were
subsequently found to be a mistake
rather than a fraud.

Occupational Health, Safety
and Injury Management

Strategic OHS and Injury
Management initiatives during
2001 02:

  Development of a long-term
workers compensation claims
strategy to provide advice to
organisations on how to manage
claims that have the potential to
resolve slowly and to return

workers injured employees to
the workplace

  The Risk Management Services
Unit provided reports to the
committee regarding the
performance of DHS workers
compensation scheme

  Formulation of a training
assessment and plan to identify
and develop specific training
packages for high risk areas and
for individual units and their
identified needs based on the risk
management principles

  Completion of a Pilot Study into
Manual Handling, with major
recommendations to the
participating agency and DHS, to
assist in the development of
strategies to reduce the number
and cost of manual handling
claims. The study is being carried

out on two further agencies to
ensure consistency across
the portfolio

  Commenced state-wide tender for
OHS training needs. It is in its first
year of operation

  A major focus on the continuation
of audits and reviews in both OHS
and Injury Management to ensure
the maintenance of accreditation
and WorkCover Performance
Standards for Self Insurers

  Continued distribution and
evaluation of the CD-ROM
 Manual Handling Guidelines for
Health and Aged Care , with the
view of updating the CD to
encompass all areas of manual
handling within an organisation.

WorkCover Liabilities include:

FAYS 2001 02

New Claims 156 Cost $532,342.36

Total Outstanding Claims 213 Cost $2,902,572.51

Housing 2001 02

New Claims 30 Cost $28,100.62

Total Outstanding Claims 30 Cost $686,023.54

DHS Divisional 2001 02

New Claims 28 Cost $99,143.43

Total Outstanding Claims 33 Cost $690,777.42

DHS Central 2001 02

New Claims 214 Cost $359,586.41

Total Outstanding Claims 276 Cost $4,248,182.46

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Overseas Travel Report 2001 02 for Public Sector Management Act employees

Number  of Destination/s Reasons for Travel Total Cost
Employees to Agency

1 Switzerland Agenda for Reconciliation-Peace Building Initiatives conference $3,400

1 Spain/France IFHP International Congress on Urban Renewal $6,075

1 USA Oacis Healthcare Training Course for Order Management $16,187

1 Finland Monitoring Behaviours Towards Global Surveillance
2nd International conference $959

1 Philippines 7th Meeting of Regional Commission for the Certification of the
Eradication of Poliomyelitis in Western Pacific Region $0

1 Singapore Public Sector Innovation Seminar $1,570

1 USA Network of jkNetworks meeting $0

1 USA/UK/Norway Study tour under sponsorship of Hugh Stretton Award $0

1 China Temporary Advisor to Chinese Government $0

1 South Korea Regional meeting of technical experts on Measles $0

2 Canada BIO 2002 International Biotechnology Convention $10,672

2 Canada Annual Oacis Healthcare Users Group Conference $9,946

1 UK European Real Estate Society 9th Annual Conference $7,431

2 UK Researching innovative Housing Models $15,110

1 Switzerland 3rd Meeting of Steering Committee on Immunisation Safety $0

18 $81,614

Energy Efficiency Action
Plan Report

In November 2001 Cabinet approved
the Government Energy Efficiency
Action Plan, a comprehensive whole-
of-government energy management
program targeted to improve energy
efficiency across all sectors of
government s operations.

This initiative is an integral part of the
national Greenhouse Strategy and

incorporates the South Australian
Government s target of a 15%
reducing energy use in government
buildings by 2010.

DHS is a very large consumer of gas
and electricity, accounting for
approximately 51% of all non-
transport energy consumed by the
non-commercial government sector in
South Australia.

DHS uses through:

  Incorporated Health units

  Office accommodation: Including
Housing Authorities (comprising
SAHT, SACHA, AHA, &amp; HomeStart
Finance), DHS Health &amp; FAYS

  SAHT landlord lighting &amp; security
and vacancy light &amp; power

  Transport (energy for
transportation purposes is not
included in this report).



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APPENDIX 2: HUMAN RESOURCE SUMMARY (continued)

Overview of Energy Consumption for the Department of Human Services
Energy use Expenditure GHG

(GJ) ($) (Tonnes of C02)

Base Year 2000 01

Hospitals &amp; Health Units 1,301,155 $19,290,268 206,861

SAHT (landlord power &amp; vacancy power) 7,915 $549,925 2,438

Office Accommodation

DHS 9,920 $439,971 3,056

Housing Authorities 8,060 $409,125 2,483

FAYS 12,409 $449,738 3,823

DHS Total 1,339,459 $21,139,027 218,661

Financial Year 2001 02

Hospitals &amp; Health Units 1,277,041 $21,636,295 201,297

SAHT (landlord power &amp; vacancy power) 7,830 $600,837 2,415

Office Accommodation

DHS 9,720 $431,759 2,994

Housing Authorities 8,500 $388,151 2,618

FAYS 11,028 $411,633 3,397

DHS Total 1,314,119 $23,468,675 212,721

Portfolio Target

2001 02 Decrease Energy consumption by 0.45% from baseline year. 1,333,431 217,667

2009 10 Decrease energy consumption by 15% from baseline year. 1,138,540 185,861

The above table provides energy use
information for energy (other than
transport energy) consumed by the DHS
in 2000 01 and 2001 02. Energy use
information contained in this table is
based upon the best currently available
information. However due to the
diverse nature of DHS entities and the
large number of sites within DHS,
energy use information for a number of
smaller sites is still being compiled.
This information, when available, will
be incorporated in the DHS energy use
database and the 2000 01 baseline
adjusted accordingly.

The energy reduction targets for
2001 02 given in the above table is an
interim target established by Energy
SA in lieu of specific targets to be
developed for each portfolio during
2002 03.

Historical records indicate that energy
use in South Australian Public
Hospitals (which account for more
than 80% of DHS energy consumption)
has tended to grow between 2.5%  
3% per annum over the last decade.

This suggests that for the DHS to
reduce it energy consumption across
the portfolio by 15% by 2010 would
require a reduction from the trend rate
of approximately 30%.

Actions to reduce energy
consumption:

Much of the energy management
focus during 2001 02 has been on the
development of a database which
records departmental energy use
down to a site level. In addition to
enabling the department to develop a
reliable benchmark against which our
performance in reducing energy use
can be assessed, this database will be
a critical tool in enabling the
development of a well-targeted
strategy to reduce energy use across
the portfolio.

Other activities occurring during
2000 01 include:

  A series of seven energy audits and
energy opportunity reviews were
undertaken at major metropolitan
and regional hospitals.

  Environmentally sustainable
development, including energy
efficiency, remains a major focus
for the Lyell McEwin
redevelopment team. The project
team has set itself an ambitious
task of creating a facility that
consumes less than 912mj per M2

per annum   this is 25% less
energy consumption than would
be expected with a  business as
usual  approach.

  Innovative modifications to the air-
conditioning system and extensive
use of solar shading devices have
seen energy consumption at the
Barmera hospital drop by nearly
30% during 2001 02.



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Account Payment Performance

Number and value of accounts paid for 2001 02:

Particulars Number of Percentage of Value in $A of Percentage
accounts paid accounts paid accounts paid of accounts

(by number)  (by value)

Paid by the due date* 83 936 74.64% 2 466 569 841.31 96.95%

Paid within 30 days or less from due date 20 283 18.04% 43 827 471.36 1.72%

Paid more than 30 days from due date 8236 7.32% 33 855 454.83 1.33%

* Note: The due date is defined as per section 11.2 of Treasurer s Instruction 11 Payment of Accounts. Unless there is a
discount or a written agreement between the public authority and the creditor, payment should be within thirty days of the
date of the invoice or claim.

Contractual Arrangements

There were five contracts greater than $4 million which extend beyond a single year:

Contract Key Objectives Private sector Duration of Details of Contingent
Participant arrangements  assets and other

transferred liabilities

APPENDIX 3:
FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Lyell McEwin Health
Service
Redevelopment
Stage A   Managing
Contractor

Contract Management
Services

Hansen Yuncken
Pty Ltd

February 2002
  August 2004

Strathmont Aged Care
Facility

Contract Management
Services

Cox Constructions
Pty Ltd

September 2001
  July 2003

New aged
care facility

The Queen Elizabeth
Hospital

Contract Management Services
for Major Works

Baulderstone
Hornibrook Pty Ltd

November 2001
  February 2003

New patient
accommodation
building

Royal Adelaide
Hospital

Contract Management Services
for Major Works

Baulderstone
Hornibrook Pty Ltd

2001   04

Modbury Public
Hospital Torrens
Valley Private
Hospital
Amending
Agreement

To amend agreements, executed
3 February 1995, that provided for
the management and operation
by Healthscope of the Modbury
Public Hospital, the Head Lease
of the site of Modbury Public
Hospital from the SAHC to the
Modbury Public Hospital Board
(Board), an underlease of a
portion of the site of Modbury
Public Hospital from the Board to
Healthscope and for the design,
construction and commissioning
of a 65 bed acute medical,
surgical and obstetrics hospital
adjacent to Modbury Private
Hospital

Healthscope
Limited

The term of the
amending
agreement is
the term of the
agreement it
amends
(19 August 1997  
5 February 2010)

Nil Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil Nil

Nil Nil



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APPENDIX 3: FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE (continued)

External Consultancies

South Australian Health Commission

The SAHC did not engage any consultants in 2001 02.

Department of Human Services

DHS engaged the following consultants in 2001 02:

Consultancies below $10 000

Twelve consultants were engaged with total expenditure of 71 383.

Consultancies between $10 000   $50 000:
Consulting firm Services

Centra Consulting Pty Ltd New Nursing Clinical Information System

KPMG Completion of Shared Services Report

Wintercraig Consulting Design &amp; Implement Executive Leadership Development Program

Health Outcomes International Evaluation of Parenting SA

Des Semples &amp; Associates Alternative Care Review

Luminis Pty Ltd Common Clients Project

Lizard Drinking Management Structures Review Project

Hames Sharley Consultant Health Planner for Barossa Health Service

Prometheus Information Pty Ltd Workshop Report and Development Proposal for South Australian
Version of HealthWIZ

Vectra Corporation Ltd Country Health System Review and Development

Kutjara Consultants Review of AP Lands

Organisational Improvement Network Review of Best Practice FACS Development Program

Health Outcomes International Evaluation of Kangaroo Island Domestic Violence Service

MA International Review of Burns Services Unit within SA

Total cost: $328 565

Consultancies above $50 000:
Consulting firm Services

Price Waterhouse Coopers Tax Consulting Services

Health Outcomes International Out of Sight   Not Out of Mind Project

Paul Laris &amp; Associates Aboriginal Health Partnership Evaluation Contract

KPMG Professional Services

Stockford Accounting Services Change Workshop Series   Change Management Strategy

John Bissett Associates International Staff Bench-Marking Analysis &amp; Professional Assistance in
Development of 2001 02 Budget Savings Strategies

Total cost: $704 781

Total Consultancies paid to 30 June 20023: $1 104 729
3 Totals may be affected by rounding.



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APPENDIX 4:
STATEMENT OF
RECONCILIATION
The Department of Human Services affirms that we will work towards:

A united Australia, which respects this land of ours, values the Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander heritage and provides justice and equity for all.

(Vision of the Council of Aboriginal Reconciliation)

The Department of Human Services
recognises Aboriginal people as the
first Australians, with a unique culture
and spiritual relationship to the land
and seas. The Department of Human
Services is strongly committed to
improving the cultural, spiritual, health,
emotional and economic wellbeing of
indigenous people in this State.

The Department of Human Services is
committed to informing Aboriginal
people of their right to accessible and
equitable services and to avenues to
redress any grievances experienced.

We commit the Department of Human
Services to achieving reconciliation by:

  actively working to increase the
number of Aboriginal people
employed within the portfolio;

  actively working to increase the
number of Aboriginal people in
decision-making positions;

  addressing the disproportionate
number of Aboriginal people in
institutions; especially within the
juvenile justice, child protection
and alternative care systems;

  actively working to eliminate
systemic racism in the workplace;

  incorporating Aboriginal needs,
issues and positive outcomes in all
our planning, including consultation
with key constituents and
Aboriginal communities;

  actively supporting and
implementing recommendations
from the Royal Commission into

Aboriginal Deaths in Custody and
the national Inquiry into the
Separation of Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Children from
their Families;

  increasing the understanding of
Aboriginal identity and experience
in the portfolio and in the broader
community;

  actively promoting the needs of
Aboriginal people across
government and in the general
community; and

  providing leadership in the
reconciliation process between
Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal
South Australians.

Progress since the
Statement of Reconciliation
was signed

A Reconciliation business plan has
been developed and printed and is
due to be launched at the
Department s Senior Management
Forum in August 2002. Since DHS
signed and publicly committed to a
Statement of Reconciliation with the
Aboriginal people of South Australia
in September 1999, the portfolio has
been actively working to provide
leadership in the reconciliation
process, through positive action and
strategic partnerships. The plan
describes six destinations or
outcomes to be achieved by the
portfolio and a set of strategies to
achieve this.



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ACRONYMS AND
ABBREVIATIONS;
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Acronyms and abbreviations
AHA Aboriginal Housing Authority

DHS Department of Human Services

DEPC Departmental Ethics and Privacy Committee

FAYS Family and Youth Services

FMC Flinders Medical Centre

HRESC Human Research Ethics
Sub-Committee

OSW Office for the Status of Women

RAH Royal Adelaide Hospital

RGH Repatriation General Hospital

SACHA South Australian Community Housing Authority

SAHC South Australian Health Commission

SAHT South Australian Housing Trust

TQEH The Queen Elizabeth Hospital

WCH Women s and Children s Hospital

Glossary of Terms

Acute care hospital services

A hospital that provides at least
minimum medical, surgical or
obstetric services for inpatient
treatment and/or care, and around-
the-clock, comprehensive, qualified
nursing services, as well as other
necessary professional services.

Alternative care for children and
young people

The care of children and young people
away from homes where the parents
or guardians are unable or unwilling
to provide adequate care. Case
Management of these children is
provided by FAYS.

Business strategies

A subset of the strategies contained
in the Strategic Directions section to
be developed and linked to Business
Plans of respective divisions and
business units.

Child protection

The investigation and assessment of
safety, risk, and the needs of children
and families where children have
been or are at risk of abuse and
neglect. It also involves the
coordination of services to strengthen
and preserve families, reunification
and family contact, and the placement
of children and young people in
alternative care where appropriate.

Children under guardianship

Children under the age of 18 years
whose legal guardian is the Minister.

Community capacity building

Community capacity consists of the
networks, organisations, attitudes,
leadership and skills that allow
communities to manage change and
sustain community-led development.
(The Role of Government in
Community Capacity Building,
Jim Cavaye, 2000)

Community capacity building aims to
promote community based decision
making and activity in a sustainable
and manageable way. This requires a
number of elements including:



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

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  the development of strong
relationships between the
community and service providers
that avoids co-dependence
and acknowledges transition
and change

  ability to identify and access
opportunities

  development of skills and
knowledge

  infrastructure and resources to
support activity and participation

  motivation and wellness to be
active in the community.

Governance

The act and rules by which an
organisation is managed and directed.

Integrated community planning

A strategic planning process which
assesses the extent of Human
Services resources available in an
area, such as a country region, and
develops a response to the priority
needs of the community. The
underlying principle is that to be
effective at the level where services
are delivered, planning must take a
holistic view of service provision in
each region, so that resources are
integrated to meet the needs of
individuals, families and communities.

Mission

A statement of the business purpose;
why does the organisation exist.

Partnership

A collaborative approach between
parties, for example community
groups, state and local government
agencies and so on to achieve an
agreed outcome in the best interest
of the community, individuals
and families.

Portfolio

The portfolio of Human Service
includes the Department of Human
Services and funded agencies. The
funded agencies include SA Health
Commission and its health units,
SA Housing Trust, Aboriginal Housing
Authority, SA Community Housing
Authority, HomeStart Finance, Family
and Youth Services.

Primary care

Refers to community based services
delivered by a wide range of
providers across the entire spectrum
of human services. The primary care
system is seen as the usual point of
contact for people seeking
assistance with health or social
problems, support for living and
chronic illness or disability, housing
and accommodation and advice.

Primary health care

It is generally referred to non-
institutional health care services,
including medical treatment and
advice provided by general
practitioners. It includes:

  services provided by community
pharmacies

  therapy and treatment services
such as counselling, allied health
services and community nursing in
non-institutional settings or in the
home; and

  preventive strategies such as
health promotion, early
identification, early prevention
and information services

  community health services.

Urban regeneration

A collaborative process designed to
address relative disadvantage in a
community and to improve and
sustain quality of life for its members,
by working with the community to
build on its resources, services, and
networks.

Values

Our preferred way of working; what
constitutes a good working
environment, including our relationship
with colleagues. The way we behave is
underpinned by our values.

Vision

A statement about what we want our
organisation to become over the next
3 to 5 years.

Well being

Refers to physical and social well
being of people. Well being is
affected by interrelationships with
other people and their environment.



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FREEDOM OF INFORMATION
Information Statement

The Freedom of Information Act 1991
gives members of the public a legally
enforceable right to access
information held by the South
Australian Government, subject to
certain restrictions.

Structure and functions
of DHS

The structure and functions of DHS,
including the various divisions that
report to the Chief Executive, are
shown at the front of this report, and
provide an overview of the reporting
lines of responsibility. The direction of
DHS is also influenced by the input of
advisory boards and committees.

Functions of DHS affecting
the public

DHS  work directly impacts on the
public in the areas of health and
community services, welfare services,
housing planning, strategy
development, major projects and
library services. FAYS is involved with
child protection (including training of
mandated notifiers), keeping families
together, and assisting disadvantaged
members of the community.

Public participation

The public can contribute to policy
development within DHS in a number
of ways. DHS uses external expertise
and policy advice through statutory
and non-statutory advisory
committees, which are comprised of
both government and non-government
representatives. Advice is taken from
peak NGOs and a consultative
process may be undertaken in the
planning, development and
implementation of policy. DHS
consults with major consumer groups,
circulates discussion papers, calls for

submissions on particular topics,
and convenes public meetings in
metropolitan and country areas.

Types of documents held
by DHS

DHS holds various health, community
services and housing publications,
including administrative and client
files, books, discussion and
background papers, reports, reviews,
serial publications, pamphlets, codes
of practice, surveys, guidelines,
policies, programs, strategies,
directories, evaluations, needs
assessments and proposals. Other
documents held include procedure
manuals, administrative circulars on
general management, finance, staffing,
plant and equipment, property, motor
vehicles and industrial circulars.

DHS  libraries keep information on
where DHS publications are stored,
and whether or not they are free, for
sale, or for inspection. Most
documents can be viewed in the
libraries, and may be photocopied
at a moderate cost per page.

The addresses of DHS libraries are
as follows:

Community Services and Health
Level 2, 162 Grenfell Street
Adelaide South Australia 5000
Telephone: 8226 7043
Facsimile: 8226 6677

Housing, Environment
and Planning
1st floor, Roma Mitchell House
136 North Terrace
Adelaide South Australia 5000
Telephone: 8303 0610
Facsimile: 8303 0611

Health Promotion SA has a small
range of free anti-smoking stickers,
leaflets and information sheets
available (Telephone: 8226 6329).

The constitutions of hospitals and
health centres incorporated under the
South Australian Health Commission
Act 1976 may be inspected in the
Parliamentary and Legal Unit,
10th floor, 11 13 Hindmarsh Square,
Adelaide (Telephone: 8226 6178).

Arrangements and
Procedures for seeking
access to records

Applications for access to, or
amendment of, DHS documents
should be addressed to:

FOI Liaison Officer (Health)
Department of Human Services
10th floor, Citi Centre
11 Hindmarsh Square
Adelaide SA 5000
Telephone: 8226 6178

FOI Liaison Officer (FAYS)
Department of Human Services
1st floor, Citi Centre
11 Hindmarsh Square
Adelaide SA 5000
Telephone: 8226 6707

FOI Liaison Officer (SAHT)
Department of Human Services
1st floor, Riverside Centre
North Terrace
Adelaide SA 5000
Telephone: 8207 0129

FOI Liaison Officer (SACHA)
Department of Human Services
5th floor, Riverside Centre
North Terrace
Adelaide SA 5000
Telephone: 8207 0227



ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

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APPENDIX 7:
DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS
AND PUBLICATIONS
Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islanders

Port Augusta Aboriginal Families
Project: an initiative of Family and
Youth Services, South Australian
Housing Trust and Port Augusta
Hospital / [Sharon McCallum] [Port
Augusta, S. Aust.: Dept. of Human
Services], 2001.

Substance misuse strategy for the
aboriginal community of Ceduna and
surrounding areas: a time for healing:
creating safe spaces in which we can
heal together / prepared by Dylan
Coleman for Aboriginal Services
Division, Department of Human
Services, and Drug and Alcohol
Services Council. Adelaide, S. Aust.:
Aboriginal Services Division,
Department of Human Services, 2001.

Recreation for everybody: promoting
health and well being of aboriginal
people with disabilities through
recreation / prepared by Vicki
Brown  [et al.] Adelaide, S. Aust.:
Department of Human Services,
Country and Disability Services
Division, 2001.

A planning framework for services to
Aboriginal people in the Port Adelaide
area, Part 1 / [prepared by Nancy
Rogers] Adelaide: Department of
Human Services, 2002.

Aboriginal teenage pregnancies
compared with non-Aboriginal in
South Australia, 1995 1999.
Australian and New Zealand Journal
of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2002;
42:187-192. Department of
Obstetrics and Gynaecology,
Adelaide University &amp; DHS.

Abortion

Committee appointed to examine and
report on abortions notified in South
Australia. 31st Annual Report   for the
year 2000. Government Printer, 2001.

Aged

Effects of casual employment on
perceptions of well-being among
older people: final report to Office for
the Ageing, Department of Human
Services / Carol Bradley and Ursula
Dahl. [Adelaide]: Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

Moving ahead: a strategic plan for
human services for older people in
South Australia, 1999 2004: step
three, implementation action plan,
2001 2002. Adelaide: Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

Aged Care Assessment Program
South Australia Evaluation Unit
report: January  June 2000. Paul
Basso, Lidija Pretreger, Helen
Christopher. Adelaide: Information
Management Services, Dept. of
Human Services, 2001.

The Strategic Directions for Older
People from Culturally and
Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds
(CALD).

Aged Care Assessment Program
South Australia Evaluation Unit
report: July   December 2000 /
responsibility for content Greg
Holmes, Ben Stavropoulos. Adelaide:
Information Management Services,
Dept. of Human Services, 2002.

Anger management

Systematic training for anger
reduction: STAR program / authors
Aldis Putnins &amp; Steve Harvey.

Adelaide: Family &amp; Youth Services,
Dept. of Human Services, 2001.

Autopsy

The national code of ethical autopsy
practice / Australian Health
Ministers  Advisory Council,
Subcommittee on Autopsy Practice.
Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services,
AHMAC Secretariat, 2002.

Child Protection

Child protection review: discussion
paper. Adelaide: Dept. of Human
Services, 2002.

Diabetes

Diabetes and health risk factors 1997
&amp; 1998: South Australian health goals
&amp; targets health priority areas /
prepared for Strategic Policy and
Planning Division, SA Dept. of Human
Services, Eleonora Dal Grande 
[et. al] Adelaide: Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

Perceptions of Patients on Renal
Dialysis in South Australia  
December 2001: Adelaide: Centre for
Population Studies in Epidemiology,
Dept. of Human Services, 2001.

Education and information issues
among people with diabetes   June
2002: Adelaide: Centre for Population
Studies in Epidemiology, Dept. of
Human Services, 2002.

Disability Services

Report on Early Intervention
Implementation Committee / prepared
by Susie Dunlop. [Adelaide, S. Aust.]:
Dept. of Human Services, Country and
Disability Services Division, 2001.



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

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Drugs

South Australian drug strategic
framework 2001 2003. [Adelaide, S.
Aust.: Dept. of Human Services, 2001].

Drugs: together, South Australians
can make a difference: a guide to
community programs in South
Australia. [Adelaide, S. Aust.:
Dept. of Human Services, 2001].

Family and Youth Services

Social welfare services planning
framework: family and youth services
2002 2005: discussion paper.
[Adelaide]: Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

FAYS Case Recording Principles and
Guidelines.

Family Violence

Interpersonal violence and abuse
survey, September 1999 / Eleonora
Dal Grande  [et al.] Adelaide:
Epidemiology Branch, Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

Competency standards for intervention
workers: working with women
subjected to domestic abuse and
violence / prepared by Dallas Colley  
Population Strategies and Research
Branch, Department of Human
Services, Gillian Anderson   Gillian
Anderson Consulting. [Adelaide]: Dept.
of Human Services, 2001.

Gambling

Gambling patterns of South
Australians and associated health
indicators, May 2001 / Anne Taylor 
[et al.] Adelaide: SERCIS, Centre for
Population Studies in Epidemiology,
Epidemiology Branch, Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

Health Insurance

Private health insurance status in
South Australia October 2000 / Gary
Starr  [et al.]; prepared for Financial
Services Division, South Australian
Department of Human Services.
Adelaide: Epidemiology Branch, Dept.
of Human Services, 2001.

Health Promotion

Drawing back the smoke screen:
promoting the benefits of being
smoke free to refugee migrants from
the Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian
communities: final report: October
2001 / Slavica Dedijer. Adelaide:
Dept. of Human Services, 2001.

Health promotion evaluations
1998   2000: a review of reports of
health promotion activity including
surveys of officials and patrons of
sponsored organisations, and
population surveys / Gary Starr.
Adelaide, S. Aust.: Department of
Human Services, Health Promotion
SA, 2001.

Abstract book: First National Tobacco
Control Conference: 12-14 June 2001,
Hilton Adelaide, Adelaide, South
Australia. [Adelaide: Dept. of Human
Services], 2001.

Folate and spina bifida, September
2001 / prepared for Health Promotion
SA, South Australian Department of
Human Services [by] Eleonora Dal
Grande, Tiffany Gill, Anne Taylor.
Adelaide: Centre for Population
Studies in Epidemiology, Dept. of
Human Services, 2002.

Physical activity in South Australian
adults, November 2001 / prepared for
Health Promotion SA, South
Australian Department of Human
Services [by] Tiffany Gill  [et al.]
Adelaide: Centre for Population
Studies in Epidemiology, Dept. of
Human Services, 2002.

Unplanned Teenage Pregnancy and
Parenthood: Adelaide: Metropolitan
Division, Department of Human
Services, 2002.

Unplanned Teenage Pregnancy and
the Support Needs of Young Mothers
  Review of Literature: Adelaide:
Metropolitan Division, Department of
Human Services, 2001.

Unplanned Teenage Pregnancy  
Statistics. Adelaide: Metropolitan
Division, Department of Human
Services, 2001.

Pregnancy Outcome in
South Australia 2000. DHS, 2001.

Maternal, Perinatal and Infant
Mortality in South Australia 2000.
Fifteenth Report of the Maternal,
Perinatal and Infant Mortality
Committee. DHS, 2001.

South Australian Birth Defects
Register Annual Report 1999.
Women s &amp; Children s Hospital, 2001.

Validation of the 1994 South
Australian perinatal data collection
form. DHS, 2001.

The contribution of maternal smoking
to Preterm birth, small for gestational
age and low birthweight among
Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal births
in South Australia. Medical Journal of
Australia 2001;174: 389 93. DHS &amp;
Department of Obstetrics &amp;
Gynaecology, Adelaide University.

 Folate before pregnancy : the impact
on women and health professionals of
a population-based health promotion
campaign in South Australia. Medical
Journal of Australia 2001;174: 631 
636. DHS &amp; Clinical Genetics Service
and Health Promotion Unit, Women s
&amp; Children s Hospital.

Invited commentary. Problems in the
diagnosis of neo-natal hip instability.
Acta Paediatrica 2001;90: 836 9. DHS
&amp; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery,
Women s &amp; Children s Hospital.

Teenage pregnancy: trends,
characteristics and outcomes in South
Australia and Australia. Australian
and New Zealand Journal of Public
Health 2002;26: 125 131. Department
of Obstetrics and Gynaecology,
Adelaide University &amp; DHS.

Surgically obtained sperm, and risk
of gestational hypertension and
pre-eclampsia. Lancet 2002;359:
673 674. Department of Obstetrics
and Gynaecology, Adelaide
University &amp; DHS.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2001 02

75

Health Services

Your rights and responsibilities: a
charter for South Australian public
health system consumers
(incorporating requirements under the
Australian Health Care Agreement)
Rev. ed. [Adelaide]: Dept. of Human
Services, Public Relations and
Communication Unit, 2001.

Youth consultation report, September
2001: a joint initiative of the
Department of Human Services and
Wakefield Regional Health Service /
report prepared by Meredith
Appleyard. Adelaide: Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

Aspects of medical services usage in
South Australia, November 2001:
prepared for Metropolitan Division,
Department of Human Services /
Tiffany Gill [et al.] Adelaide: Dept. of
Human Services, 2002.

Review of Hospital Avoidance
Programs. Strategy and Operations,
Statewide Division, DHS. May 2002.

Burns Review. MA International,
Strategy &amp; Operations, Statewide
Division, DHS. May 2002.

Patient Evaluation of South Australian
Hospital Services Comparative Report
June 2001  Adelaide: Centre for
Population Studies in Epidemiology,
Dept. of Human Services, 2002.

The North West Adelaide Health
Study: summary of key biomedical
findings, policy implications, and
research recommendations   May
2002. Adelaide: Centre for Population
Studies in Epidemiology, Dept. of
Human Services in conjunction with
Dept. of Medicine, University of
Adelaide, South Australia, 2002.

The North West Adelaide Health
Study: risk factors and associated
chronic conditions   May 2002:
Adelaide: Centre for Population
Studies in Epidemiology, Dept. of
Human Services in conjunction with
Dept. of Medicine, University of
Adelaide, South Australia, 2002.

The North West Adelaide Health
Study: key biomedical findings, policy
implications, and research
recommendations   May 2002.
Adelaide: Centre for Population
Studies in Epidemiology, Dept. of
Human Services in conjunction with
Dept. of Medicine, University of
Adelaide, South Australia, 2002.

Tissue Retention Inquiries  
Information Package and Guidelines
for Hospitals. Strategy &amp;
Operations, Statewide Division,
DHS. April/May 2002.

Homelessness

 Moving Yarns  Aboriginal Youth
Homelessness in Metropolitan
Adelaide: Adelaide: Metropolitan
Division, Department of Human
Services, 2001.

Housing

SACHA Annual Report 2000 01.

SACHA Community Housing Data
Collection Report 2000 01.

HomeStart Finance Annual Report
2000 01.

HomeStart Newsletter, Winter
2001 Edition.

HomeStart Newsletter, Summer
2002 Edition.

South Australian Aboriginal Housing
Authority Annual Report 2000 01.

SAHT Annual report 2000 01.

SAHT Trust in Focus 2000 01.

Trust Talk Tenant Link December 2001.

Trust Talk Tenant Link June 2002.

SAHT Chronological History
1936 2001.

Vulnerable Adults in the Inner City  
An Analysis of the Data: Adelaide:
Metropolitan Division, Department of
Human Services, 2001.

Human Services

Working together: a framework for
the relationship between the
Department of Human Services and
non-government community service
providers. [Adelaide, S. Aust.]: Dept.
of Human Services: SACOSS, [2001].

What type of society do we want in
the 21st century?: Life Journeys
National Conference: handbook of
abstracts: Adelaide, Australia,
30 April   1 May 2001 / editors
Lee Wightman  [et al.] Adelaide,
S. Aust.: Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

Life journeys: Human Services
national conference &amp; expo. Adelaide,
S. Aust.: Department of Human
Services, 2001. http://www.dhs.life-
journey.net/100106.php

Destination excellence: a service
excellence framework / Department
of Human Services. [Adelaide]:
Dept. of Human Services, 2001

Legislation

A guide to the drugs and poisons,
licences and permits of the Controlled
Substances Act, 1984, and its
regulations / prepared for the
Pharmaceutical Services Branch,
Department of Human Services by
Keith G. McKellar. Adelaide:
Dept. of Human Services, 2001.

Medical records

Client identification data standards.
Volume 1, Data elements. Adelaide,
S. Aust.: Dept. of Human
Services, 2002.

Men s health

Gateways to men s health: 2000 2001
/ Adelaide Central Community Health
Service, Enfield. Adelaide: Dept. of
Human Services, 2001.



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

76

Mental Health

Multicultural Mental Health Access
Program (McMHAP) review / Paul
Aylward and Cecilia Moretti Adelaide:
South Australian Community Health
Research Unit, Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

Mental health first aid for South
Australians / Karin Myhill and
Margaret Tobin. [Adelaide]:
Department of Human Services,
Mental Health Unit, [2001].

Mental health in South Australia:
action plan for reform of mental
health services: country mental health
commitment 2001 2005. [Adelaide]:
Department of Human Services,
Mental Health Services 2001.

Mental health plan, Northern and Far
Western Region: regional plan.
Volume one, 2001 2004 / Jane
Edwards, Jeff Fuller. Adelaide:
Dept. of Human Services, 2001.

Organ Donation

Organ Donation in South Australia:
experience with a modified Spanish
model. Transplantation Reviews,
Vol. 15, No 1, January 2001
pp. 46 49. Karen Herbertt and
Geoffrey Dahlenburg.

Palliative care

Report to Parliament on palliative
care in South Australia 2001 /
researched and prepared by Genelle
Cooper, Lisa Huber and Kate
Jefford. Adelaide: Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

Privacy

Code of fair information practice /
Department of Human Services.
Adelaide: Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

Public Health

Petting zoo infection control
guidelines: for petting zoo operators,
environmental health officers and
education and childcare services 2002
/ Communicable Disease Control
Branch and Environmental Health
Branch. Adelaide: Dept. of Human
Services, 2002.

Pregnancy outcome in South
Australia 2000. Adelaide: Dept. of
Human Services, Pregnancy Outcome
Unit, 2001.

South Australian influenza survey,
November 2001 / prepared for
Anne Kempe, Communicable Disease
Control Branch, Statewide Division,
Department of Human Services.
Adelaide: Dept. of Human
Services, 2002.

Validation of the 1994 South
Australian perinatal data collection
form / Angela McLean  [et al.]
Adelaide, S. Aust.: Pregnancy
Outcome Unit, Epidemiology Branch,
Dept. of Human Services, 2002.

SA Cervix Screening Program:
back-up record system for pap
smears &amp; biopsies: statistical report
1999. Adelaide: Dept. of Human
Services, 2001.

BreastScreen SA Statistical Report
1998, BreastScreen SA, DHS.

Epidemiology of cancer in South
Australia, incidence, mortality and
survival 1997 to 2000: incidence and
mortality 2000, analysed by type and
geographical location: twenty-four
years of data. Adelaide: Dept. of
Human Services, South Australian
Cancer Registry, 2001.

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Risk Management

Manual handling guidelines for health
and aged care industries [computer
file] / Department of Human Services,
Risk Management Services
[Adelaide]: Dept. of Human Services,
Risk Management Services, 2001.

Volunteering

Volunteering in the Department of
Human Services / Department of
Human Services. Adelaide: Dept. of
Human Services, Strategic Planning
and Policy Division, 2001.

The art of giving [videorecording]:
snapshots of volunteering in the
DHS / Department of Human
Services. [Adelaide]: Dept. of
Human Services, 2002.

Young offenders

Victim awareness program for young
offenders / author Aldis Putnins.
Adelaide: Dept. of Human Services,
Family &amp; Youth Services, 2002.


	DHS Annual Report 2001 02
	Contact Details
	Human Services at a Glance
	Contents
	Letter of Transmittal
	Chief Executive's Report
	Portfolio Responsibilities &amp; Structure
	Organisational Chart   prior to 6 March 2002
	Organisational Chart   as at 30 June 2002
	Ministerial Portfolio Responsibilities
	Boards and Committees
	Strategic Direction 1: Improving Services for Better Outcomes
	Strategic Direction 2: Increasing the State's Capacity to Promote Quality of Life
	Strategic Direction 3: Redistributing Resources in a Changing Environment
	Strategic Direction 4: Strengthening a Culture of Working Together
	Strategic Direction 5: Providing Sound Management
	Promoting Independence: Disability Action Plans for SA
	South Australian Health Commission Annual Report
	Departmental Ethics &amp; Privacy Committee
	Appendix 1: Hospital Activity Statements
	Appendix 2: Human Resource Summary
	Appendix 3: Financial Performance
	Appendix 4: Statement of Reconciliation
	Appendix 5: Acronyms &amp; Abbreviations; Glossary of Terms
	Appendix 6: Freedom of Information
	Appendix 7: Departmental Reports &amp; Publications



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