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<pre>
 
 
 
Version control and change history 
Version Date from Date to Amendment 
1.0 23/06/2004 25/07/2005 Original version 
2.0 25/07/2005 30/03/2010 Reviewed 
3.0 30/03/2010 23/09/2013 Reviewed 
4.0 23/09/2013 07 Sept 2015 Reviewed 
5.0 07 Sept 2015 Current  
  Department for Health and Ageing, Government of South Australia. All rights reserved. 

 

Clinical Guideline 
Varicella Zoster (chicken pox) in Pregnancy Clinical 
Guideline 
 
Policy developed by:    SA Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Approved SA Health Safety &amp; Quality Strategic Governance Committee on:   
07 September 2015 
Next review due:  30 September 2018 
 
 
 

 

Summary Guideline for the management of the pregnant woman with 
varicella zoster (chicken pox) 
 

Keywords Varicella zoster virus, VZV, chicken pox, zoster, shingles, aciclovir, 
valaciclovir, zoster immune globulin, ZIG, latent infection, clinical 
guideline 
 

Policy history  Is this a new policy?   N 
Does this policy amend or update an existing policy?  Y v4.0 
Does this policy replace an existing policy?  N 
 
 

Applies to All SA Health Portfolio 
All Department for Health and Ageing Divisions 
All Health Networks 
CALHN, SALHN, NALHN, CHSALHN, WCHN, SAAS 
 

Staff impact All Clinical, Medical, Nursing, Allied Health, Emergency, Dental, 
Mental Health, Pathology 
  

  
PDS reference CG114 

Policy                                                                
 

 



South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) 
in pregnancy 

  Department of Health, Government of South Australia. All rights reserved. 
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4 
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 1 of 11 
  

Note 
 
This guideline provides advice of a general nature.  This statewide guideline has been prepared to promote and facilitate 
standardisation and consistency of practice, using a multidisciplinary approach.  The guideline is based on a review of 
published evidence and expert opinion.  

Information in this statewide guideline is current at the time of publication.  

SA Health does not accept responsibility for the quality or accuracy of material on websites linked from this site and does not 
sponsor, approve or endorse materials on such links. 

Health practitioners in the South Australian public health sector are expected to review specific details of each patient and 
professionally assess the applicability of the relevant guideline to that clinical situation. 

If for good clinical reasons, a decision is made to depart from the guideline, the responsible clinician must document in the 
patient s medical record, the decision made, by whom, and detailed reasons for the departure from the guideline. 

This statewide guideline does not address all the elements of clinical practice and assumes that the individual clinicians are 
responsible for discussing care with consumers in an environment that is culturally appropriate and which enables respectful 
confidential discussion. This includes: 

  The use of interpreter services where necessary, 
  Advising consumers of their choice and ensuring informed consent is obtained, 
  Providing care within scope of practice, meeting all legislative requirements and maintaining standards of 

professional conduct, and  
  Documenting all care in accordance with mandatory and local requirements 

 
Explanation of the aboriginal artwork: 
The aboriginal artwork used symbolises the connection to country and the circle shape shows the strong relationships amongst families and the aboriginal culture. The horse shoe shape 
design shown in front of the generic statement symbolises a woman and those enclosing a smaller horse shoe shape depicts a pregnant women. The smaller  horse shoe shape in this 
instance represents the unborn child. The artwork shown before the specific statements within the document symbolises a footprint and demonstrates the need to move forward together in 
unison. 

 

    

 

 

 

  
Australian Aboriginal Culture is the oldest living culture in the world yet Aboriginal 
people continue to experience the poorest health outcomes when compared to non-
Aboriginal Australians. In South Australia, Aboriginal women are 2-5 times more 
likely to die in childbirth and their babies are 2-3 times more likely to be of low birth 
weight.  The accumulative effects of stress, low socio economic status, exposure to 
violence, historical trauma, culturally unsafe and discriminatory health services and 
health systems are all major contributors to the disparities in Aboriginal maternal 
and birthing outcomes. Despite these unacceptable statistics the birth of an 
Aboriginal baby is a celebration of life and an important cultural event bringing 
family together in celebration, obligation and responsibility. The diversity between 
Aboriginal cultures, language and practices differ greatly and so it is imperative that 
perinatal services prepare to respectively manage Aboriginal protocol and provide a 
culturally positive health care experience for Aboriginal people to ensure the best 
maternal, neonatal and child health outcomes. 
 




South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) in pregnancy 
  
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4  
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 2 of 11 
   

Literature review 

? Over 85 % of women of childbearing age in industrialised countries are immune to varicella 
zoster virus (VZV)

1,2
 

? Varicella pneumonia complicates up to 10 % of cases of VZV in pregnancy
1
  

? Perinatal varicella (chickenpox) carries a 20 to 30 % risk of transmission to the neonate
1
  

? Studies of maternal varicella from 12-28 weeks gestation suggest a 1.4% risk of fetal 
varicella syndrome (FVS). Subsequent abnormalities may include:   

? Skin scarring (78%)   

? Eye abnormalities (60%)    

? Limb abnormalities (68%) 

? Prematurity and low birthweight (50%) 

? Cortical atrophy, intellectual disability (46%)   

? Poor sphincter control (32%) 

? Early death (29%)
3
  

Varicella-zoster virus 

? Varicella (chickenpox) is a highly contagious disease caused by primary infection with 
varicella-zoster virus (VZV)

2
 and may cause maternal mortality or serious morbidity  

? Reactivation of latent infection, usually many years after the primary infection, may result in 
herpes zoster (shingles), a painful vesicular eruption in the distribution of sensory nerve 
roots

2
  

? Both varicella (chickenpox) and zoster (shingles) are notifiable diseases.  Notification must 
be made to the Communicable Disease Control Branch of SA Health as soon as possible 
and at least within three days of suspicion of diagnosis, by telephone or post.  Telephone 
number: 1300 232 272

4 
 

? The appropriate notification form for reporting a notifiable disease or related death in South 
Australia may be downloaded and is available from URL: 
http://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/NotifiableDiseaseReporting 

? This form is not to be sent by email for reasons of confidentiality  

Route of transmission 

? Infection with chickenpox is transmitted through airborne / respiratory droplets and direct 
contact with vesicle fluid 

Incubation period 

? 10 to 21 days (may be up to 35 days in contacts given high titre zoster immunoglobulin, 
ZIG) 

Period of infectivity 

? 48 hours before the onset of rash until crusting of all lesions (usually day 6 of rash) 

? Infectious period may be prolonged in people with impaired immunity 





South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) in pregnancy 
  
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4  
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 3 of 11 
   

Infection control 

? Non-immune staff should not care for the woman / baby infected with chickenpox 

? Varicella (and herpes zoster) vesicles contain large numbers of virus particles. Ensure 
appropriate transmission based (standard, contact and airborne) precautions including: 

? A negative pressure room with door shut (chickenpox and disseminated 
shingles)  

? Immune staff in attendance 

? Gloves, gown 

? All dressing materials should be treated as medical waste 

? For further information link to www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/InfectionPrevention 

? Chickenpox and disseminated shingles use standard, contact and airborne precautions   

? Localised shingles use contact precautions (only immune staff in attendance, single room, 
gloves, gown) 

? In herpes zoster (shingles), transmission of infection usually requires contact with vesicle 
fluid; however, there is also evidence of respiratory spread

2
.  Localised shingles requires 

standard and contact precautions (not airborne precautions) 

Susceptibility to varicella 

? Women and babies susceptible to infection with VZV (may be severe or life-threatening) 
include: 

? No history of varicella (chickenpox or shingles) 

? Seronegative for varicella antibodies (VZV-IgG negative) 

? No documented evidence of varicella vaccination 

Significant Exposure3 

? For the purpose of infection control and prophylaxis, significant exposure of a susceptible 
woman who is pregnant to varicella includes:  

? Living in the same household as a person with active varicella or herpes zoster 

OR 

? Direct face to face contact with a person with varicella or herpes zoster for at 
least 5 minutes 

OR 

? Being in the same room for at least 1 hour  

? Chickenpox cases are infectious from 2 days before rash until lesions crusted 

Management of maternal exposure to varicella-zoster virus  

History of previous chickenpox 

? No action required 

No or uncertain history of chickenpox 

? Obtain serology for antibody status (VZV-IgG) (if practicable) 

? ZIG if required should be given within 96 hours. Testing should only be done if ZIG would 
still be able to be given, if required, within this window 





South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) in pregnancy 
  
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4  
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 4 of 11 
   

Within 96 hours from exposure 

? Zoster immunoglobulin (ZIG) should be given to all seronegative women within 96 hours 
(see adult dose under ZIG dosage below)  

? However there may be some limited effect out to as late as 10 days post exposure
3
 

? Advise to seek medical care immediately if chickenpox develops 

More than 96 hours following exposure 

? Oral aciclovir or valaciclovir (see dosage below) should be considered for women: 
  

? In the second half of pregnancy 

? With a history of an underlying lung disease 

? Who are immuno-compromised 

? Who are smokers
3,5 

 

Note: Advise women to seek medical care immediately if chickenpox develops 

Management of varicella-zoster in pregnancy 

Less than 24 hours since appearance of rash3 

? Oral aciclovir 800 mg 5 times a day for 7 days OR oral valaciclovir 1 g three times a day for 
7 days 

? Monitor at home 

More than 24 hours since onset of rash3 

? No oral aciclovir / valaciclovir and monitor at home if:    

? No underlying lung disease   

? Not immunocompromised 

? Non-smoker  

? Monitor in hospital if any of the above risk factors 

? Offer appropriate fetal medicine counselling 

Complications3  

? Advise to seek medical attention for the following complications:   

? Respiratory symptoms 

? Haemorrhagic rash or bleeding 

? New pocks developing after 6 days 

? Persistent fever &gt; 6 days 

? Neurological symptoms 

? Give aciclovir 10 mg / kg every 8 hours for 7 to 10 days (IV followed by oral [see dosage 
below]) and administer supportive therapy  

Consider caesarean section if: 3 

? Signs of significant fetal compromise 

? Evidence of maternal respiratory failure exacerbated by advanced pregnancy 




South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) in pregnancy 
  
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4  
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 5 of 11 
   

Risk of fetal varicella syndrome (FVS) after maternal VZV 

Timing of maternal infection 

Less than 12 weeks gestation 
0.55% 

12-28 weeks gestation 
1.4% 

More than 28 weeks gestation 
No cases of FVS 
reported 

Refer to maternal fetal specialist for prenatal diagnosis and counselling 

? Detailed fetal ultrasound for anomalies is recommended at least five weeks after primary 
infection 

? Repeat ultrasounds until delivery.  If abnormal may consider fetal MRI 

? VZV fetal serology is unhelpful 

? Amniocentesis not routinely advised if ultrasound normal, because risks of FVS low but 
negative VZV PCR may be reassuring 

 

Ultrasound and amniocentesis findings 

Risk of FVS low 
VZV PCR on amniotic fluid positive but ultrasound normal 
at 17-21 weeks and remote if ultrasound normal at 23-24 
weeks 

Risk of FVS very 

high 

VZV PCR positive on amniotic fluid and ultrasound shows 
features of FVS 

Risk of FVS 

negligible 

VZV PCR on amniotic fluid negative and ultrasound 
normal at 23 weeks 

No case reported 
No case of FVS reported in recent series when amniotic 
fluid VZV PCR negative 

 

Management of infants exposed to maternal varicella zoster 

Maternal chickenpox &gt; 7 days before delivery2,3 

? No zoster immunoglobulin (ZIG) required 

? No isolation required 

? Encourage breastfeeding 

? No other interventions even if baby has chickenpox at or very soon after birth unless 
preterm &lt; 28 weeks gestation or low birth weight &lt; 1,000 g 

? Very preterm infants (? 28 weeks gestation) born with chickenpox should 
receive intravenous aciclovir 20 mg  / kg / dose every 8 hours as a slow 
infusion (1-2 hours)   




South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) in pregnancy 
  
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4  
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 6 of 11 
   

Maternal chickenpox 7 days before to 2 days after birth2,3  

? High titre varicella-zoster immunoglobulin (ZIG) is available from the Australian Red Cross 
Blood Service on a restricted basis (SA Red Cross telephone: 8422 1200)  

? The medical practitioner should contact the Australian Red Cross Blood Service to request 
supply  

? Give newborn zoster immunoglobulin (ZIG) 200 IU (one vial) intramuscularly (IM) 
immediately 

? ZIG should be given less than 24 hours after birth but may be given up to 72 
hours after birth 

? Discharge term infants as soon as possible  

? No isolation required 

? Encourage breastfeeding 

Maternal chickenpox &gt; 2 to 28 days after birth2,3 

? Some experts give ZIG 200 IU (one vial) IM when mothers develop chickenpox to term 
babies who are more than 2 to 28 days of age but little data to support this 

? Due to the increased risk of severe varicella in newborns of seronegative 
women (if the mother has no personal history of infection with VZV), give ZIG 
to neonates exposed to varicella between 2 to 28 days of age  

? If infant &lt; 28 weeks gestation or 1,000g birth weight give ZIG (preferably within 96 hours but 
can be given up to 10 days post-maternal rash 

? Discharge term infants as soon as possible  

? No isolation required 

? Encourage breastfeeding 

Zoster (Shingles) 

? Herpes zoster in an otherwise healthy pregnancy is not associated with intrauterine 
infection, even when the dermatomes innervating the uterus (T10-L1) are involved

6
 

? Maternal herpes zoster is not an indication for ZIG administration to the baby 

Management of term infants exposed to VZV 3  

Significant exposure (see definition above) either in postnatal ward or at 

home 
? Evidence to inform protection conferred to the newborn by maternal VZV vaccination is 

limited.  Expert opinion is that if the mother has a history of a complete course of age-
appropriate doses of VZV vaccine, she is considered immune and thought to confer 
protection to the newborn irrespective of measured antibody levels.  Most experts would not 
recommend ZIG be given to the newborn in this setting  

? Opinions vary as to the need to administer ZIG to term infants of seronegative mothers who 
are exposed to chickenpox, as there is limited evidence to suggest increased risk of severe 
disease 

Maternal history of chickenpox or has had an age appropriate course of VZV vaccine 

? No intervention required 

? No isolation from affected sibling required 

? Review if baby develops chickenpox 




South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) in pregnancy 
  
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4  
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 7 of 11 
   

No or uncertain maternal history of chickenpox and no VZV vaccine course 

?  Check maternal serology urgently 

? If seropositive: 

? No intervention required 

? No isolation from affected sibling required 

? Review if baby develops chickenpox 

?  If seronegative or serology unavailable: 

? Consider administration of ZIG to infant (ideally within 96 hours post exposure 
but can be given up to 10 days later) 

? No isolation from sibling required 

? Medical review if infant develops chickenpox 

Management of infants who develop varicella (chickenpox) 

&lt; 37 weeks 

? Only give intravenous aciclovir  if the infant is preterm &lt; 28 weeks OR low birth weight        
&lt; 1,000g (see dosage below)  

? Greater than 28 weeks gestation and birthweight more than 1,000g (but &lt; 37 weeks 
gestation), discuss with infectious diseases consultant on a case by case basis   

? Use transmission based precautions (for further information link to 
http://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/InfectionPrevention) 

? Ventilated cases require strict isolation   

? Isolate in negative pressure room until all lesions are crusted (only immune staff should care 
for the infant) 

Term infant (? 37 weeks)3 

? May be at home or on postnatal ward 

? Admit to paediatric unit (negative pressure room with transmission [contact and airborne] 
based precautions) 

Mild case and ZIG given &lt; 24 hours after birth
3
  

? Observe 

? Only give intravenous aciclovir if respiratory symptoms develop (see aciclovir dosage 
below) 

Severe case or ZIG given &gt; 24 hours after birth
3
 

? Give intravenous aciclovir (see aciclovir dosage below) 

? Administer supportive care 





South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) in pregnancy 
  
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4  
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 8 of 11 
   

Health care workers 

? Only health care workers known to be immune on history, antibody status or documented 
evidence of varicella vaccination should care for women / babies with clinical varicella 
(chickenpox) between day 10-21 of a significant exposure (10-35 days if patient given ZIG) 
or with zoster (shingles) 

? If unsure of immune status, exposed health care workers should arrange to have a varicella 
antibody test performed 

? No further action is needed if the antibody test is positive 

? If the antibody test is negative, these health care workers should not have contact with the 
woman / baby from days 10 to 21 after their first contact 

? All health care workers are encouraged to establish their immune status through individual 
hospital risk management services  If seronegative, health care workers are encouraged to 
receive varicella vaccine 

Zoster immune globulin 

? High titre varicella zoster immune globulin (ZIG) is available from the Red Cross Blood 
Transfusion Service in Australia on a restricted basis for the prevention of varicella in high 
risk subjects

2
 

? Zoster immunoglobulin (human):  Vials contain 200 IU in 1 to 2 mL Varicella antibody for 
intramuscular injection (16 % solution of gammaglobulin fraction of human plasma from 
donors with high titre of varicella-zoster antibodies + thiomersal 0.01 % w/v)

2
  

? Administer at room temperature 

ZIG dosage 

Neonate 
? Intramuscular injection of  200 units (1 vial) per dose regardless of the weight of the 

newborn  

Adult 
? Intramuscular injection of 600 units (3 vials) 

Aciclovir 3,7,8 

? Aciclovir is an antiviral agent with some efficacy against varicella zoster virus
7
   

? Aciclovir has few side effects (rash, nausea, vomiting, headache), and no evidence of 
teratogenicity   

? An aciclovir Pregnancy Registry, kept from 1984 to 1998 has not shown any increase in 
birth defects over the normal background rate 

? Oral valaciclovir (Valtrex
 
) can be used as an alternative to aciclovir during pregnancy.  For 

further information see http://www.mothertobaby.org/files/acyclovir.pdf 

Aciclovir dosage3,9 

Less than 37 weeks3,9 

? Give intravenous acyclovir 20 mg / kg / dose every 8 hours as a slow infusion 

Greater than or equal to 37 weeks3,9  

Mild case and ZIG given &lt; 24 hours after birth,
3,9

  

? Only give intravenous aciclovir 20 mg / kg / dose every 8 hours if respiratory symptoms 
develop (see dosage according to gestational age below)  

Severe case or ZIG given &gt; 24 hours after birth
3,9

 

? Give intravenous aciclovir 20 mg / kg / dose every 8 hours 





South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) in pregnancy 
  
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4  
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 9 of 11 
   

Adult 
Oral    

? Administer oral aciclovir 800 mg dose 5 times a day for 7 days 

 
Intravenous 

? Administer intravenous aciclovir 10 mg / kg / dose every 8 hours for 7 days 

Intravenous dosage adjustment for renal impairment: 

CrCl 25 to 50 mL/min/1.73 m
2
: 100 % of normal dose every 12 hours 

CrCl 10 to 25 mL/min/1.73 m
2
: 100 % of normal dose every 24 hours 

CrCl less than 10 mL/min/1.73 m
2
: 50 % of normal dose every 24 hours 

 

Read more at http://www.drugs.com/dosage/acyclovir.html#ci6ojw4lbdmpAJ3k.99 





South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) in pregnancy 
  
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4  
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 10 of 11 
   

 

References 

1. Langford KS.  Infectious disease and pregnancy.  Current Obstet Gynaecol 2002; 12: 
125-30. 

2. National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).  The Australian 
Immunisation Handbook, 10th ed. Canberra:  Australian Government Publishing 
Service; 2013.  Available from URL: 
http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/Ha
ndbook10-home 

3. Palasanthiran P, Starr M, Jones C, Giles M, editors.  Management of perinatal 
infections.  Sydney: Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases (ASID) 2014. 
Available from:  URL: http://www.asid.net.au/resources/clinical-guidelines 

4. SA Health.  Government of South Australia.  Notifiable conditions under the SA 
Public Health Act 2011.  Department of Health [online] 2011 [cited 2013 March 13]; 
[1 screen].   Available from URL:  
http://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/NotifiableDiseaseReporting 

5. Heuchan AM, Isaacs D - On behalf of the Australasian subgroup in paediatric 
infectious diseases of the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases. The 
management of varicella-zoster virus exposure and infection in pregnancy and the 
newborn period MJA 2001; 174: 288-292.  Available from URL:  
http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/174_06_190301/heuchan/heuchan.html#foo
tadd10 

6. Enders G, Miller E, Cradock-Watson J, Ridehalgh M. Consequences of varicella and 
herpes zoster in pregnancy: Prospective study of 1739 cases. Lancet 1994; 343: 
1548 1551  

7. Yoshikawa T, Suga S, Kozawa T Kawaguchi S, Asano Y.  Persistence of protective 
immunity after postexposure prophylaxis of varicella with oral aciclovir in the family 
setting.  Arch Dis Child 1998; 78:61-63 (Level III-2). 

8. MIMS.  MIMS full prescribing information for aciclovir intravenous infusion.  
Antiviral agents.  MIMS Annual 2003; Section 8 (i): 800-802  

9. Electronic Therapeutic Guidelines (eTG).  Varicella (chickenpox).  [revised 2014 Oct].  
In eTG complete [Internet].  Melbourne:  Therapeutic Guidelines Limited; 2014 Oct.  
Accessed 2015 Jun 15 at URL:  http://online.tg.org.au.proxy1.athensams.net/ip/ 

 

Useful web sites: 

Mother to baby.  Chickenpox (varicella) and the vaccine and pregnancy.   
Available from URL: http://www.drugs.com/dosage/acyclovir.html#ci6ojw4lbdmpAJ3k.99 
 
South Australian Health   You ve got what.  Chickenpox and shingles.   
Available from URL:  
www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/YouveGotWhat 

 

 

 

 












South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines 

varicella-zoster (chickenpox) in pregnancy 
  
 

ISBN number:   978-1-74243-751-4  
Endorsed by:                         South Australian Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network 
Last Revised: 07/09/15 
Contact:                                 South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines Workgroup at:         

                                               HealthCYWHSPerinatalProtocol@sa.gov.au Page 11 of 11 
   

Version control and change history 

PDS reference: OCE use only 

 
Version Date from Date to Amendment 

1.0 23 Jun 04 25 Jul 05 Original version 

2.0 25 Jul 05 30 Mar 10 review 

3.0 30 Mar 10 23 Sept 13 review 

4.0 23 Sept 13 07 Sept 15 Reviewed 

5.0 07 Sept 15 Current  

 

 

 Abbreviations 
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

et al. And others 

FVS Fetal varicella syndrome 

IM Intramuscular 

IU International units 

kg Kilogram(s) 

mg Milligram(s) 

mL Millitre(s) 

NHMRC National Health and Medical Research Council 

SA South Australia 

URL Uniform resource locator 

VZIG Varicella Zoster Immune Globulin, VZIG 

VZV Varicella zoster virus 



	varicella zoster chicken pox in pregnancy cover_Sept2015
	Clinical Guideline
	Varicella Zoster (chicken pox) in Pregnancy Clinical Guideline
	Policy developed by:    SA Maternal &amp; Neonatal Clinical Network
	Approved SA Health Safety &amp; Quality Strategic Governance Committee on:
	07 September 2015
	Next review due:  30 September 2018

	varicella zoster chicken pox in pregnancy_policy_Sept2015

</pre>
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