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<pre>
 
 

 

 Department for Health and Ageing  
2016-17 Annual Report 

 
 
 
 

Department for Health and Ageing 
PO Box 287 Rundle Mall Adelaide SA 5000 

www.sahealth.sa.gov.au 

Contact phone number +61 8 8226 0795 

Contact email HealthCE@sa.gov.au  

ISSN 2201-0475 

Date presented to Minister: 28 September 2017 
 

  






2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Contents 
 

Section A: Reporting required under the Public Sector Act 2009, the Public 
Sector Regulations 2010 and the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987
 ................................................................................................................ 4 

Agency purpose or role ..................................................................................................... 4 

Objectives ......................................................................................................................... 4 

Key strategies and their relationship to SA Government objectives ................................... 5 

Agency programs and initiatives and their effectiveness and efficiency ............................. 8 

Legislation administered by the agency ........................................................................... 16 

Organisation of the agency .............................................................................................. 17 

Other agencies related to this agency (within the Minister/s area/s of responsibility) ....... 17 

Employment opportunity programs .................................................................................. 18 

Agency performance management and development systems ........................................ 19 

Occupational health, safety and rehabilitation programs of the agency and their 
effectiveness ................................................................................................................... 20 

Fraud detected in the agency .......................................................................................... 21 

Strategies implemented to control and prevent fraud ....................................................... 21 

Whistleblowers disclosure ............................................................................................... 22 

Executive employment in the agency as at 30 June 2017................................................ 22 

Consultants ..................................................................................................................... 22 

Financial performance of the agency ............................................................................... 25 

Other information requested by the Minister(s) or other significant issues affecting the 
agency or reporting pertaining to independent functions .................................................. 26 

Section B: Reporting required under any other act or regulation ..................... 29 
Food Act 2001 ................................................................................................................. 29 

Safe Drinking Water Act 2011 ......................................................................................... 35 

Carers Recognition Act 2005 ........................................................................................... 39 

Section C: Reporting of public complaints as requested by the Ombudsman. 40 
Complaint outcomes ........................................................................................................ 40 

Appendix 1: Local Government Activities under the Food Act 2001 ................. 42 

Appendix 2: Food Outbreak Investigations 2016-17 ........................................... 52 

Appendix 3: Annual Reports by Enforcement Agencies under the  
Safe Drinking Water Act 2011 ............................................................ 57 

Appendix 4: Audited financial statements 2016-17 ........................................... 145 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Section A: Reporting required under the Public Sector Act 2009, the Public 
Sector Regulations 2010 and the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987 

 

Agency purpose or role  
 

The Department for Health and Ageing (the department) assists the Minister for Health, 
the Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse and the Minister for Ageing to set the 
policy framework and strategic directions for SA Health. The department supports the 
delivery of public health services, formulates health and ageing policy and programs, 
facilitates public and consumer consultation on health issues, and monitors the 
performance of South Australia s health system by providing timely advice, research and 
administrative support. 
 
It also has an interface role with central agencies and a policy and regulatory role. The 
department s role includes direct service provision, developing statewide plans, and 
commissioning services from Local Health Networks (LHNs) and  
SA Ambulance Service (SAAS) and other providers. 
 

Objectives  
 

SA Health s key objective is to lead and deliver a comprehensive and sustainable health 
system that ensures healthier, longer and better lives for all South Australians. In 2016-17, 
the department committed to delivering a health system that produces positive health 
outcomes by: 

1. providing leadership in reforming our health system, public health services, health 
and medical research, policy development and planning 

2. managing growth and increasing demand on our health system, and providing our 
patients with the best possible care 

3. improving the quality and safety of health care, through the provision of technology 
and information solutions that deliver better patient outcomes 

4. improving mental health care  

5. reducing and better managing health conditions and promoting Aboriginal community 
health and wellbeing 

6. focusing on health promotion, illness prevention and early intervention to sustain 
good community health and wellbeing.  

 

 

 

 

  

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Key strategies and their relationship to SA Government objectives  
 

Key strategy SA Government objective 
Objective 1 

Reforming our health system by upgrading 
hospital infrastructure. 

  

South Australia s Strategic Plan: Our Health 
Targets: 
78. Healthy South Australians 
84. Health services standard. 
 
Delivering Transforming Health   Our Next 
Steps. 

Objective 2 

Implement the Transforming Health 
services reforms by: 

  developing the governance and 
statewide networks to lead, support 
and sponsor the implementation of 
evidence-based models of care 

  unlocking capacity and improving 
patient access and flow across the 
system of care by reconfiguring health 
services. 

  

South Australia s Strategic Plan: Our Health 
Targets: 
78. Healthy South Australians 
84. Health services standard. 
 
Delivering Transforming Health   Our Next 
Steps. 

 

Objective 3 

Improving the quality and safety of health 
care, through the provision of technology 
and information solutions by: 

  continuing to deploy enterprise 
solutions 

  addressing issues associated with the 
use of legacy technology. 

 

 

 

South Australia s Strategic Plan: Our Health 
Targets: 
78. Healthy South Australians 
84. Health services standard. 
 
eHealth Strategic Plan 2016-2020 Strategic 
Objective 2   to be patient-centric: Continue 
deployment of enterprise solutions. 

 

Objective 4 

Improving access to inpatient care for 
mental health patients by:  

  reducing waiting times in Emergency 
Departments (ED) 

  reducing overall length of stay. 

 

 

 

 

 

South Australia s Strategic Plan: Our Health 
Targets: 
78. Healthy South Australians 
84. Health services standard. 
 
The Minister for Mental Health and 
Substance Abuse established a target that 
from 1 January 2016, mental health 
consumers should not routinely wait more 
than 24 hours in an ED. 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Key strategy SA Government objective 

Objective 5 

Reducing and better managing health 
conditions within the Aboriginal 
community by: 

  improving immunisation rates of 
Aboriginal children. 

Promoting Aboriginal community health 
and wellbeing in children and families by: 

  supporting and training staff in early 
childhood centres 

  undertaking community engagement 
activities to promote children s health. 

 

 

South Australia s Strategic Plan Targets: 
06. Aboriginal wellbeing  
26. Early childhood   birth weight 
28. Aboriginal leadership  
51. Aboriginal unemployment 
53. Aboriginal employees 
79. Aboriginal life expectancy 
80. Aboriginal smoking rates. 
 
South Australia s commitment to Closing the 
Gap supports the health related targets within 
the Council of Australian Government 
(COAG) National Indigenous Reform 
Agreement to:  

  close the gap in life expectancy in a 
generation by 2031, and  

  halve the gap in mortality rates for 
children under five by 2018. 

Objective 6 

Promoting positive health outcomes and 
preventing illness by: 

  reducing the impact of tobacco 
smoking 

  reducing the associated harms of 
alcohol and other drugs. 

 

South Australia s Strategic Plan Targets: 
80. Smoking rates 
81. Alcohol consumption. 
 
South Australian Tobacco Control Strategy 
2011-2016. 

South Australian Alcohol and Other Drug 
Strategy 2011-2016. 

South Australian Alcohol and Other Drug 
Strategy 2017-2021. 
 

Objective 6 

Promoting prevention and early 
intervention by: 

  reducing the suicide rate in South 
Australia. 

 

 

South Australia s Strategic Plan Target: 
86. Psychological wellbeing. 
 
South Australian Suicide Prevention Strategy 
2012 -2016: Every life matters. 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Key strategy SA Government objective 

Objective 6 

Promoting good health, prevention and 
early intervention by: 

  reducing the transmission of, and 
morbidity and mortality caused by 
blood borne viruses (BBVs) 

  minimising the personal, clinical and 
social impact of BBVs for prisoners in 
South Australia. 

 

The Standard Guidelines for Corrections in 
Australia 2012 (Department for Correctional 
Services (DCS) endorsed).  

Hepatitis C Prevention, Treatment and Care: 
Guidelines for Australian Custodial Settings 
2008 (DCS and SA Health endorsed). 

South Australian Prisoner Blood Borne Virus 
Prevention Action Plan 2017   2020 (DCS 
and SA Health). 

South Australian Alcohol and Other Drugs 
Strategy 2017   2021.  

South Australia s Strategic Plan: Our Health 
Target: 
78. Healthy South Australians. 

Strong Foundations and Clear Pathways: 
Women Offender Framework and Action Plan 
2014   2019 (DCS). 

Reducing re-offending   10% by 2020 (DCS).  

Nursing Model of Care: Viral Hepatitis 
Management in South Australia 2016  
(SA Health endorsed).  

South Australian Prisoner Health Service 
Model of Care 2016 (SA Health endorsed). 

 
Objective 6 

Promoting good health, prevention and 
early intervention by: 

  minimising the risk of transmission of 
vaccine preventable diseases in SA 
health services. 

 

 

 

South Australia Strategic Plan Target: 
21. Greater safety at work. 

DHA Strategic Direction 2016-2018 priority: 
Delivering safe, quality and innovative 
services in a continuous improvement 
environment. 

Work Health and Safety Act 2012 (South 
Australia). 

Standard 3 (preventing and Controlling 
Healthcare Associated Infections) of the 
Australian Commission on Safety and Quality 
in Health Care s national Safety and Quality 
Health Service Standards (September 2012). 

 

  

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Agency programs and initiatives and their effectiveness and efficiency  
 

Program name Indicators of 
performance/effectiveness/efficien
cy 

Comments  

Objective 1 

Transition to the new 
Royal Adelaide Hospital 
(RAH). 

 

 

Technical completion was achieved 
15 March and commercial 
acceptance on 14 June 2017. 

 

The new RAH opened 
on 5 September 2017. 

Objective 1 

Investment in Capital 
Works Projects: 

  Noarlunga 
Ambulance Station 

  Noarlunga Hospital  

  Modbury Hospital  

  Lyell McEwin Hospital 
(LMH). 

 

Noarlunga Ambulance Station 
opened on 12 September 2016. 

Plans for Noarlunga Hospital include 
a new Day Surgery unit with two new 
operating theatres, a new renal 
dialysis unit and dedicated spaces 
for children and families in the ED. 

Modbury Hospital upgraded inpatient 
wards for rehabilitation and a new 
ambulatory rehabilitation facility 
including gymnasium, treatment 
rooms, hydrotherapy pool, therapy 
garden, gait laboratory, prosthetics 
fitting lab and services, therapy 
kitchen and laundry, tele-
rehabilitation facilities to support 
country patients. 

The new cardiac catheter lab at LMH 
increased access to cardiology and 
interventional radiology services for 
northern Adelaide residents. 

 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Program name Indicators of 
performance/effectiveness/efficien
cy 

Comments  

Objective 2 

Transforming Health: 
Development and 
progressive 
implementation of 
statewide models of 
care. 
 

 

 

Statewide models of care were 
delivered. Implementation is at 
various stages of business as usual 
activities: 

  Stroke Services 
  Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) 

Stage 1 
  ACS Stage 2 and 3 
  Rehabilitation  
  Orthogeriatrics  
  After Hours Cover  
  7 Day Allied Health  
  Paediatric Surgery  
  Veterans Mental Health Model of 

Care  
  Comprehensive Care of Older 

People.  

 

Objective 2 

Transforming Health: 

Reconfiguration of health 
services: 

Central Adelaide LHN 
(CALHN) to  
Northern Adelaide LHN 
(NALHN). 

 

The transfer of a defined set of 
services, corresponding northern 
activity and staff from CALHN to 
NALHN (known as Phase 1) was 
progressively achieved starting from 
October 2016. This enabled northern 
Adelaide resident access to 
rehabilitation services closer to 
home. 

 

 

CALHN and NALHN 
continue to work with 
GP communities to 
ensure that relevant 
service referrals will be 
directed to NALHN.  
This will be a continual 
approach and will form 
part of business as 
usual activities. 

Objective 2 

Transforming Health: 

Reconfiguration of health 
services: 

Southern Adelaide LHN 
(SALHN). 

 

Clinical reconfiguration planning and 
consultation occurred in SALHN 
including plans for surgical and 
perioperative medicine, corporate 
services and clinical services 
transition from the Repatriation 
General Hospital (RGH) to other 
SALHN sites. 

 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Program name Indicators of 
performance/effectiveness/efficien
cy 

Comments  

Objective 3 

Deployment of 
Enterprise Patient 
Administration Systems 
(EPAS). 

 

EPAS was fully activated at The 
Queen Elizabeth Hospital. 

EPAS was implemented into Marion 
GP Plus April 2017. 

Commenced the RGH Outpatient 
Moves in support of the closure of 
RGH in July 2017. 

Systems and business readiness 
was finalised for implementation into 
the new RAH. 

Commenced planning activities to 
support the Flinders Medical Centre 
implementation. 

 

Delivering 
improvements to 
patient safety via an 
EPAS throughout 
metropolitan Adelaide.   

Delivering on key 
strategy by providing a 
single patient record 
for all South 
Australians. 

Objective 3 

Deployment of 
Enterprise System for 
Medical Imaging (ESMI) 
at all nominated hospital 
sites. 

 

ESMI has now been installed at all 
major hospital locations providing a 
single, enterprise-wide system 
supporting digital medical image 
archiving. 

 

All digital imaging and 
associated medical 
reports available at all 
hospitals irrespective 
of where the image 
was taken.  

Objective 3 

Deployment of 
Enterprise Pathology 
Laboratory Information 
System (EPLIS). 

 

EPLIS has gone live at the initial site 
of the Women s and Children s 
Hospital. 

 

Begins the 
transformation to an 
improved, modern and 
efficient pathology 
service. 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Program name Indicators of 
performance/effectiveness/efficien
cy 

Comments  

Objective 4 

Implemented localised 
ED based bed 
management at LHN 
level.  

Increased efficiency of 
general adult acute unit 
by reducing length of 
stay. 

 

The percentage of non-compliance 
for mental health consumers waiting 
more than 24 hours in an ED has 
improved from 18.6% of all mental 
health presentations to EDs in  
2014-15 to 5.2% in 2016-17. Over 
this period presentations increased 
from 11 701 to 13 514. 

A reduction in the average length of 
stay for  medium stay  mental health 
adult consumers (5 to 35 days) from 
16.3 days in 2014-15 to 11.0 days in 
2016-17. 

The average visit time for mental 
health presentations in metropolitan 
EDs for adults and older people 
peaked at 15.5 hours in 2014-15 and 
has reduced to 9.0 hours in 2016-17. 

 

Improvement in mental 
health leadership, bed 
management and 
access to beds is 
equivalent with the rest 
of health resulting in 
reduced ED waiting 
times.  

Improves mental 
health consumer 
outcomes and 
experience. 

Objective 5 

Development and 
implementation of: 

  South Australian 
Aboriginal Cancer 
Control Plan  
2016-2021 

  South Australian 
Aboriginal Heart and 
Stroke Plan  
2017-2021 

  South Australian 
Aboriginal Diabetes 
Strategy 2017-2021. 

 

The Plans and Strategy were 
released in May 2017. 

The South Australian Aboriginal 
Chronic Disease Consortium was 
established in May 2017 to 
implement the Plans and Strategy. 

 

 

Closing the Gap aligns 
with the principles of 
South Australia s 
Transforming Health 
reforms, particularly in 
regards to providing 
patient-centred, safe, 
effective, accessible, 
efficient and equitable 
health services to all 
South Australians. 

Objective 5 

Aboriginal children s 
immunisation program. 

 

 

At the end of 2016-17, 95.9% of 
children aged 60-63 months were 
fully immunised. This is 2.6% higher 
than the non-Aboriginal children 
coverage rate (93.3%) during the 
same period. 

 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Program name Indicators of 
performance/effectiveness/efficien
cy 

Comments  

Objective 5 

Strong Aboriginal 
Children s Health Expo. 

 

The sixth Strong Aboriginal 
Children s Health Expo held on  
19 April 2017 was attended by 
approximately 560 people. This is an 
improvement of 140 people from 
2015-16. Twenty-four government 
and non-government organisations 
participated with stalls and 
promotional activities compared to 
17 last financial year. 

 

Objective 6 

Implementing Suicide 
Prevention Strategy  

2012-2016: 

  Connecting with 
People Suicide 
Mitigation program 

  Suicide Prevention 
Networks (SPN) 

  Suicide Prevention 
Community Grants. 

 

 

 

 

2017-2021: 

 

  

25 Clinicians trained to train others in 
Connecting with People.  

Over 600 people trained in the 
Connecting with People approach in 
2016-17.  

Eighteen SPNs developed across 
South Australia linked to Local 
Government areas. The SPNs raise 
awareness, breakdown stigma, 
facilitate community education and 
offer support to those bereaved by 
suicide. 

Twenty community grants provided 
funding to local initiatives to promote 
suicide prevention in areas of high 
risk populations. 

Development was undertaken of the 
South Australian Suicide Prevention 
Plan 2017-2021. The new Plan is 
scheduled for release in September 
2017. 

 

Many South 
Australians have been 
affected in some way 
by the death of a 
person who has taken 
their own life. Suicide 
is the leading cause of 
death for South 
Australians aged  
15 to 44.  

 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Program name Indicators of 
performance/effectiveness/efficien
cy 

Comments  

Objective 6 

Tobacco programs: 

  social marketing 
campaign to 
encourage quitting 

  creating smoke-free 
areas, including the 
smoke-free outdoor 
dining legislation 

   Give Up Smokes For 
Good  Aboriginal 
smoking cessation 
campaign. 

In relation to the target of reducing 
smoking prevalence in young people 
(15-29 years) from 22.8% in 2010 to 
16% by 2016, we observed a 
reduction to 12.3% in 2016 
(achievement of this target). 

In relation to the target of reducing 
smoking by people (15 years and 
over) from 20.7% in 2010 to 15% by 
2016, we observed a reduction to 
14.9% in 2016 (achievement of this 
target). 

The 3-year average daily smoking 
rate for 2014-16 was 13.1%, which is 
a reduction from 14.5% in 2013 (3 
year moving averages). 

For Aboriginal South Australians, the 
daily smoking rate decreased from 
47.0% in 2008 to 38.2% in 2014-15. 

Tobacco smoking is 
the largest single 
preventable cause of 
death and disease in 
Australia. The 
reductions in smoking 
rates achieved in 
South Australia are 
important for reducing 
the disease burden 
caused by smoking in 
this state. 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Program name Indicators of 
performance/effectiveness/efficien
cy 

Comments  

Objective 6 

Implementing the 
Alcohol and Other Drug 
Strategy 2011-2016.  

Programs aimed at: 

  reducing illicit drug 
use and its 
associated harms 

  reducing the rate of 
alcohol-related harm 

  reducing drug-related 
harm to young people 
and families of those 
with substance 
misuse issues 

  reducing harm from 
substance misuse 
among Aboriginal 
people 

  improving the 
timeliness of 
monitoring systems 
so trends in alcohol 
and other drug 
misuse are detected 
as early as possible. 

 

2017-2021: 

 

 

 

Encouraging trends towards a 
reduction in risky consumption levels 
of alcohol were observed since 
2011, including a reduction in 
alcohol-related hospitalisations and a 
decline in alcohol-related crime in 
licensed premises. In 2016, alcohol 
consumption at risky levels in people 
aged 14 years and over who drink at 
levels that put them at risk of harm 
on a single occasion at least once a 
month was prevalent in 26% of 
South Australians, with no decrease 
from 2015 data. Results indicate that 
risky drinking rates are not trending 
towards the 2020 goal of 21.4% (a 
30% reduction). 

We have observed a reduction in the 
number of people aged 14-29 who 
reported use of any illicit drug 
(including cannabis) in the last 12 
months, from 26% in 2010 to 24% in 
2013. 

There has been a decrease in the 
total number of alcohol-related 
hospitalisations among the South 
Australian Aboriginal population from 
1029 in 2009-10 to 786 in 2014-15. 

The South Australian Alcohol and 
Other Drug Strategy 2017-2021 was 
developed and released in 
December 2016. 

 

Ensuring high quality 
alcohol and other drug 
services and evidence-
informed strategy 
contributes to reducing 
harms in the 
community, as 
observed in the 
reduction of 
consumption and 
hospitalisations. 

 

The Allsop Review of 
Alcohol and Other 
Drug treatment 
programs concluded 
there is good 
alignment between 
practices in the  
SA Health system and 
the International 
Standards, and strong 
evidence that there is 
an appropriate range 
of evidence?based 
services available. 

 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Program name Indicators of 
performance/effectiveness/efficien
cy 

Comments  

Objective 6 

Development and launch 
of the first South 
Australian Prisoner 
Blood Borne Virus 
Prevention Action Plan 
2017-2020. 

 

Extensive consultation was 
undertaken amongst key 
stakeholders (both government and 
non-government, including clinicians 
and unions) for review. 

In August 2016, SA Health and DCS 
committed to establishing a joint 
working party to examine the 
enablers and barriers in policy, 
evidence, health and safety, and 
legislation toward implementing the 
full suite of harm reduction strategies 
as part of the Plan s implementation. 

The Action Plan was endorsed by 
both the Minister for Health and the 
Minister for Correctional Services in 
January 2017, and formally launched 
at a World Hepatitis Day event 
hosted by Hepatitis SA which was 
attended by stakeholders from 
across both the health and 
correctional services sectors on  
24 July 2017. 

 

The Action Plan is a 
first ever Australian, 
and joint Health and 
Corrections 
departments, prisoner 
blood borne virus 
prevention action plan.  

A prison system free of 
BBVs will improve the 
health and safety of 
prisoners and prison 
workers, reduce 
onward transmission of 
BBVs in the wider 
community upon 
prisoner release, and 
contribute to a 
reduction in the overall 
burden of disease 
caused by BBVs in 
South Australia. 

Objective 6 

Development of the 
Health Care Workers in 
South Australia Policy 
Directive (2017) to 
minimise the risk of 
transmission of vaccine 
preventable diseases in 
SA Health services. 

 

 

 

Extensive stakeholder consultation 
including site visits and workshops. 

SA Health Working Group led the 
development of the Policy Directive. 

Key resources were developed 
including a Screening Questionnaire 
and Certificate of Compliance, a set 
of Frequently Asked Questions, 
Refusal Forms for health care 
workers, compliance checklists for 
SA Health services and education 
providers, and an Immunisation 
Expert Advisory Panel Terms of 
Reference. 

KPIs have been developed and will 
be measured following 
implementation of the Policy 
Directive over the 2017-2020 period 
with the overall objective of ensuring 
all health care workers in SA Health 
services are compliant with the 
requirements of the Policy Directive. 

 

Health care worker 
compliance with the 
Policy Directive will 
reduce the number of 
cases of vaccine 
preventable diseases 
contracted by, or 
transmitted to, health 
care workers in  
SA Health services, 
including reduced 
number and extent of 
outbreaks and 
improved outbreak 
management. 

 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

 

Legislation administered by the agency 
 

The department plays a role in administering all legislation committed to the Minister for 
Health, Minister for Ageing and the Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse with 
some legislation administered in conjunction with other public sector agencies. 

Minister for Ageing  
Aged Citizens Clubs (Subsidies) Act 1963 

Office for the Ageing Act 1995  

Retirement Villages Act 1987  

 

Minister for Health 
Advance Care Directives Act 2013 

Assisted Reproductive Treatment Act 1988 

Blood Contaminants Act 1985 

Consent to Medical Treatment and Palliative Care Act 1995 

Food Act 2001 

Gene Technology Act 2001 

Health and Community Services Complaints Act 2004  

Health Care Act 2008  

Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (South Australia) Act 2010  

Health Professionals (Special Events Exemption) Act 2000 

Health Services Charitable Gifts Act 2011  

Motor Vehicle Accidents (Lifetime Support Scheme) Act 2013 

National Health Funding Pool Administration (South Australia) Act 2012 

Prohibition of Human Cloning for Reproduction Act 2003 

Research Involving Human Embryos Act 2003 

Safe Drinking Water Act 2011 

South Australian Public Health Act 2011  

Transplantation and Anatomy Act 1983 

 

Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse 
Controlled Substances Act 1984  

Mental Health Act 2009 

Public Intoxication Act 1984  

Tobacco Products Regulation Act 1997   

 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Organisation of the agency  
 

As at 30 June 2017, there were two divisions within the Department for Health and 
Ageing: 

  Finance and Corporate Services 

  Transforming Health 

 

The department s organisational chart can be accessed at the SA Health website. 

 

Other agencies related to this agency (within the Minister/s area/s of 
responsibility) 

The public sector agencies listed below are responsible for reporting information about their 
activities and operations in their own annual report submitted to the Minister for Health, 
Minister for Ageing or the Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse.  

Minister for Ageing 
Office for the Ageing 

 

Minister for Health 
Central Adelaide Local Health Network 

Country Health SA Local Health Network 

Health and Community Services Complaints Commissioner 

Health Performance Council 

Health Services Charitable Gifts Board 

Northern Adelaide Local Health Network 

Pharmacy Regulation Authority of South Australia 

SA Ambulance Service 

South Australian Public Health Council 

Southern Adelaide Local Health Network 

Women s and Children s Health Network 

 

Health Advisory Councils: 

Central Adelaide Local Health Network Health Advisory Council (Governing Council) 

Country Health SA Health Advisory Councils (39 across South Australia) 

Country Health SA Local Health Network Health Advisory Council (Governing Council) 

Northern Adelaide Local Health Network Health Advisory Council (Governing Council) 

Southern Adelaide Local Health Network Health Advisory Council (Governing Council) 

Women s and Children s Health Network Health Advisory Council (Governing Council) 

 17 | P a g e  




2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

SA Medical Education and Training Health Advisory Council 

SA Ambulance Service Volunteers  Health Advisory Council 

Veterans  Health Advisory Council 

 

Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse 
Controlled Substances Advisory Council 

Mental Health Commission 

 
Employment opportunity programs 
 

Program name Result of the program 
Transition to Professional 
Practice Program (TPPP)   
Registered Nurses and 
Registered Midwives. 

SA Health offered 459 positions for the nursing and 
midwifery TPPP for 2017 in country and metropolitan 
sites.  

2017 Medical interns. Appointed 251 medical interns for the 2017 intern training 
year. 
 

Mental Health Nursing. Twenty-four positions were filled in metropolitan locations. 
 

Pharmacy Interns. Twenty-two positions across a number of sites in an 
annual intake. 
 

Country Health SA LHN 
Assistants in Nursing - 
Enrolled Nurse Cadetship. 

Fifteen places were offered at a number of country 
locations. 

Paramedic Interns. Fifty positions were offered with three Paramedic Intern 
intakes. 
 

Jobs 4 Youth. Ninety-two trainees and graduates were placed in SA 
Health which exceeded the allocated 90 placements 
required. 
 

Aboriginal Health 
Scholarships. 

Supported 33 continuing students of medicine, nursing, 
midwifery, social work, occupational therapy, paramedic 
science, psychology and dentistry.  
 
Thirteen new scholars were inducted into the program and 
eight Aboriginal scholars graduated in dentistry, nursing, 
physiotherapy, psychology and public health. 
 

 

  

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Agency performance management and development systems 
 
Performance management 
and development system 

Assessment of effectiveness and efficiency 

Performance Review and 
Development. 

As at 30 June 2017, 41% of department staff had a 
formal Performance Review and Development 
discussion with their manager in the past six months.  
The forms and processes used within the department 
are under review and will be updated during 2016-17. 
 

Leading Clinicians Program. SA Health s statewide 10-month multidisciplinary clinical 
leadership development program assists health 
professionals in clinical leadership roles to develop their 
leadership performance and improve patient-centred 
care.  
 
In 2016, 82 clinicians (70 participants and 12 facilitators) 
completed the program. Evaluation demonstrated 
benefits for care recipients and families; improvements 
to organisational systems and practices of care; changes 
in leadership behaviour; gains in knowledge and skill; 
changes in attitudes and perceptions; strong positive 
reactions to the program and high levels of satisfaction.  
 
A further 84 clinicians (72 participants and 12 facilitators) 
commenced this program in March 2017. 
 

Leading Health Transformation 
Program. 

This 12-month program was developed for SA Health by 
KPMG to support leaders to develop skills in 
collaborating to create system wide change; expose 
leaders to multiple leadership perspectives and 
transformative leadership skills; leverage global 
healthcare practice; and embed an evidence-based 
approach to service planning.  
 
In the first year, commencing in September 2016, 100 
executives and senior staff from across the department 
and LHNs are undertaking this program, with a further 
150 staff commencing in September 2017. Evaluation of 
the first year of the program is in progress. 
 

Leadership and Development 
of the Allied Health and 
Scientific Professions within 
SA Health.                                  

Development of Allied Health 7 Day Model of Care for 
application across all identified Model of Care/clinical 
areas was undertaken and delivery of the 
implementation toolkit.  
 

Leadership and Development 
of the Allied Health and 
Scientific Professions within 
SA Health.                                  

The Allied Health Professional + Professional 
Development Reimbursement Program continued with 
funding support provided to 1250 Allied and Scientific 
Health Professionals in 2016-17, inclusive of SA Health 
Child Protection and Mental Health Allied Health 
Professionals. 
 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Performance management 
and development system 

Assessment of effectiveness and efficiency 

Partner with the Universities, 
VET sector and health sites 
regarding clinical placements 
(non-medical), teaching, 
education standards, training 
and research. 
 

Expansion of the Clinical Placement Management 
System. Bookings for 1.5 million clinical placement hours 
(half the applicable professions) is now online. Rolled 
out across 243 organisations and 44 000 staff. Roll out 
planned for the remaining professions during 2018-20. 

 
Occupational health, safety and rehabilitation programs of the agency and 
their effectiveness 
 
Occupational health, safety 
and rehabilitation programs 

Effectiveness  

Governance, Accountability 
and Communication. 

There have been improvements capturing newly 
identified Work Health Safety (WHS) defined Officers 
during this period and currently there are 59 Defined 
Officers who have completed the induction training.  

There are four WHS Consultative Committees and each 
met quarterly.   

   Department for Health and Ageing (DHA)  
WHS Consultative Committee 

   Procurement Supply Chain Management  
WHS Consultative Committee 

   SA Biomedical WHS Consultative Committee 

   Drug and Alcohol Services SA (DASSA)  
WHS Consultative Committee.  

A review of DHA WHS Consultative Committee 
membership has begun to ensure increased participation 
and attendance. 

There were five endorsed WHS Injury Management 
(WHSIM) Policy Directives, Guidelines and related 
documents released during 2016-17 as well as the 
WHSIM Strategic Plan 2016-19. Work is being 
undertaken to identify gaps to ensure business units 
align their practices and further promote and implement.    

The final report for the external WHSIM Audit Verification 
System evaluation was published in 2016-17. 
Additionally, DHA Workforce Health performed internal 
safety audits on WHSIM Roles and Responsibilities 
Governance, Plant and Equipment Safety as well as 
injury management to confirm compliance with  
SA Health WHSIM Policy Directives and /or Guidelines. 
The results of the internal and external audits in 2016-17 
revealed some gaps in DHA safety management 
practices and these are being addressed. There were 16 
audit corrective actions closed out during this period. 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Occupational health, safety 
and rehabilitation programs 

Effectiveness  

Hazard and Risk Management. There were a total of 19 hazards reported which is a 
14% decrease from 2015-16. 

Fitness for Work. Over 740 workers participated in the annual Staff 
Influenza Vaccination program; take up for the 
department was 27.6% and DASSA 44.1%. 

Injury Management. New claims activity was lower in 2016-17 when 
compared to 2015-16 with 15 new claims received  
(13 less than 2015-16). 

When comparing June 2017 to June 2016, open claims 
decreased from 47 to 19 (60% decrease) with long term 
claims decreasing by 16 (62% decrease). As at  
June 2017, 11 of 19 the open claims (30%) currently 
have active Return to Work (RTW) services in place. 

When compared to 2015-16: 

   direct claim costs for all injuries types in 2016-17 
decreased by 15% (-$95 923). 

For 2016-17:  

   muscular Skeletal Injuries direct claim costs decreased   
by 53% (-$100 818). 

   direct claim costs for Psychological injuries increased 
by 22% (+$39 750). 

 

Fraud detected in the agency 
 
Category/nature of fraud Number of instances 
For the 2016-17 financial year, no confirmed cases of fraud were 
identified. 
 

0 

 

Strategies implemented to control and prevent fraud  
 
The department has implemented a Fraud and Corruption Control Policy and Plan which 
closely aligns with the SA Public Sector Fraud and Corruption Control Policy published in 
January 2016. 

 

Data for the past five years is available at: Data for the past five years is available at: 
https://data.sa.gov.au/data/organization/sa-health 

 

 

  

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Whistleblowers disclosure 
 
Number of occasions on which public interest information 
has been disclosed to a responsible officer of the agency 
under the Whistleblowers Protection Act 1993. 

0 

 

Data for the past years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/organization/sa-health 

 

Executive employment in the agency as at 30 June 2017 
 
Executive classification Number of executives 

Executive Level F 1 

SAES 1 Level 30 

SAES 2 Level 6 

 

Data for the past five years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/organization/sa-health 

 
For further information, the Office for the Public Sector has a data dashboard for further 
information on the breakdown of executive gender, salary and tenure by agency. 

 

Consultants 
 
The following is a summary of external consultants that have been engaged by the 
Department for Health and Ageing, the nature of work undertaken and the total cost of the 
work undertaken. 

Consultants Purpose Value 

All consultancies below 
$10 000 each 

Various consultancies for professional and 
other advice. 

$ 18 723 

Consultancies above $10 000 each 

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Provide advice and support in the planning, 
design and implementation of the 
Transforming Health Program. 

$ 9 817 232 

Ernst and Young Provide advice, guidance and assurance 
services to the Transforming Health Board. 

$ 1 236 562 

Ernst and Young Provide assistance in developing and 
implementing the Orthopaedic and 
Cardiovascular Prosthesis consumables 
procurement project. 

$ 1 153 229 

Deloitte Consulting Pty Ltd Undertake an operational readiness review 
of the new Royal Adelaide Hospital. 

$ 490 666 

SAMHRI SA Aboriginal health needs and system gap 
analysis. 

$ 295 420 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Consultants Purpose Value 

Lodestar Australia Provide expert advice and support to  
SA Health End User Computer Agreement 
procurement process. 

$ 178 000 

KPMG Undertake a review of SA Health s supply 
chain and logistics function. 

$ 176 562 

Hardes and Associates Provide an inpatient activity projection 
model for future demand and supply of 
acute hospital services. 

$ 122 904 

RixStewart Pty Ltd Prepare and undertake the tender process 
for site specific hotel services at various  
SA Health hospitals. 

$ 115 487 

Michael Reid and 
Associates Pty Ltd 

Review of the Public Health and Clinical 
Systems Branch. 

$ 95 000 

Ernst and Young Develop Business Case and evaluate 
shortlisted options for the future role of 
Aged Care Assessment Program (ACAP) in 
South Australia. 

$ 91 408 

PriceWaterhouseCoopers 
Indigenous Consulting 

Evaluate Closing the Gap program. $ 83 777 

Deloitte Risk Advisory Pty 
Ltd 

Review and provide recommendations for 
improvements to the Business Continuity 
Management framework. 

$ 80 000 

The Checkley Group Pty 
Ltd 

Evaluation of the Enterprise Patient 
Administration System (EPAS) and Central 
Adelaide Local Health Network Go-Live 
readiness  

$ 70 386 

Supply Chain Services 
Australia 

Provide logistics supply chain expertise to 
assist and support the delivery of the 
Distribution Centre Investment Project. 

$ 69 215 

Dr Sonia Allan Review the Assisted Reproductive 
Treatment Act 1988. 

$ 61 724 

FSE Consulting Review processes and staffing 
requirements identified in the OPS Benefits 
Review report. 

$ 45 600 

Mercer Consulting Undertake Long Service Leave actuarial 
valuation as at 30 June 2016 for all SA 
Health entities. 

$ 43 500 

Moira Deslandes 
Consulting 

Design and implement a Statewide 
Conversation Program with older people to 
inform them of the development of the state 
Age-friendly strategy and action plan. 

$ 40 000 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Consultants Purpose Value 

Aurecon Australasia Pty 
Ltd 

Undertake a post incident review of the 
Flinders Medical Centre emergency stand-
by power arrangements, including the 
physical infrastructure and related 
organisational factors. 

$ 40 000 

Enrite Solutions Review the existing Seniors Card 
Salesforce database and provide a design 
specification for a Seniors Card mobile 
application. 

$ 30 000 

Ernst and Young Develop a supplier engagement framework 
and supplier strategy document. 

$ 30 000 

J M Richter Consulting Pty 
Ltd 

Develop a base strategy and Governance 
Model for the South Australian Health and 
Biomedical Precinct to enable baseline 
discussion amongst key partners/ 
stakeholders. 

$ 24 500 

Carramar Consulting Pty 
Ltd 

Develop a business case for the relocation 
of the Women's and Children's Hospital to 
the new RAH site. 

$ 16 146 

Brett and Watson Pty Ltd Undertake the medical malpractice actuarial 
valuation as at 30 June 2016. 

$ 11 490 

Michele Herriot Health 
Promotion Consulting 

Review the Country Health SA LHN  
Health Advisory Committees. 

$ 10 000 

Total all consultancies $ 14 447 531 

 
Data for the past five years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/organization/sa-health 

 
See also https://www.tenders.sa.gov.au/tenders/index.do for a list of all external 
consultancies, including nature of work and value. See also the Consolidated Financial 
Report of the Department of Treasury and Finance http://treasury.sa.gov.au/  for total value 
of consultancy contracts across the SA Public Sector.  

 

  

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Financial performance of the agency 
 
The following is a brief summary of the overall financial position of the agency. The 
information is unaudited. Full audited financial statements for 2016-17 are attached to this 
report at Appendix 4. 

 
The Department produced streamlined financial statements this year (in line with AASB 101 
Presentation of Financial Statements) making them less technical and more accessible to 
non-accountants. This has reduced the statements from around 109 pages in 2015-16 to 
63 pages in 2016-17 (42% reduction). 

 
 

 
 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

 

 
Other financial information 

Nil to report. 

Other information requested by the Minister(s) or other significant issues 
affecting the agency or reporting pertaining to independent functions 
 
National Health Reform 
In March 2017, the South Australian Premier signed the Addendum to the National Health 
Reform Agreement giving effect to revised public hospital arrangements for the three year 
period from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2020. 
 
The Addendum provides for:  

  the continuation of activity based funding arrangements in public hospitals subject 
to a 6.5% cap per year on growth in Commonwealth funding  

  reforms to reduce potentially avoidable demand on public hospitals, including: 
o a price signal to hospitals for instances of poor quality or unsafe care to 

improve safety and quality outcomes; and 
o better coordinated care for patients with chronic and complex health 

conditions, including the negotiation of bilateral agreements;  
  a commitment to negotiate a longer-term public hospital funding agreement to 

commence 1 July 2020, to be developed by the Commonwealth and all 
jurisdictions and agreed by COAG in 2018. 

 
The Independent Hospital Pricing Authority continues developmental work on 
incorporating pricing and funding for safety and quality into the Pricing Framework for 
Public Hospital Services. 
 
Discussions continued on the development of bilateral Commonwealth-State agreements 
on enhanced coordinated care for patients with chronic and complex conditions. These 
agreements will include commitments to a range of nationally agreed priority areas in 
addition to broader coordinated care reforms with a focus on a range of topics of mutual 
interest including aged care integration, end of life care, mental health, multidisciplinary 
team care, rural and remote service delivery. 

National Partnership Agreements 
In 2016-17, South Australia received approximately $18.4 million in Commonwealth 
Government funding under National Partnership and Project Agreements (NPAs) for a 
variety of health related programs and services. Progress continued in negotiating a range 
of NPAs in South Australia including: 

  successful negotiation of the Project Agreement on the OzFoodNet Program 
extending for a further 4 years 

  successful negotiation of the one-year extension to the Project Agreement on the 
Rheumatic Fever Strategy  

  further progress made into re-negotiating COAG agreements on Public Dental 
Services for Adults, Essential Vaccines, Improving Trachoma Control Services for 
Indigenous Australians and the Vaccine Preventable Diseases Surveillance 
program. 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

 
The 2017-18 Federal Budget confirmed the following extensions to a number of important 
COAG Agreements, including:  

  Public Dental Services for Adults   an additional $242.5 million for two and a half 
years  

  BreastScreen Australia Program   an additional $64.3 million nationally over four 
years; and 

  Rheumatic Fever Strategy   an additional $18.8m over four years. 
 

It also confirmed the Commonwealth will provide, subject to a request to market, up to 
$68.0 million in 2017-18 toward the purchase of accelerator equipment and two treatment 
rooms in support of the establishment of a proton beam facility at the South Australian 
Health and Medical Research Institute precinct. 

Mental Health  

The 2017-18 Federal Budget also allocated funding for a range of Mental Health programs 
including: 

  from 2017-18, $80.0 million nationally over four years for psychosocial support 
services for people with mental illness who do not qualify for the National Disability 
Insurance Scheme 

  from 2017-18, $11.1 million over three years to help prevent suicide at high risk 
locations and provide additional support; and 

  from 2017-18, $9.1 million over four years to improve access to psychological 
services through telehealth in regional, rural and remote Australia. 

Legislative reviews 

Health Care Act 2008 
Amendments to the Health Care Act 2008 passed by Parliament in 2015 were brought into 
effect on 1 September 2016. These amendments included mechanisms to: 

  allow the Minister for Health to set fees for incidental services charged by SA 
Ambulance Service for services that do not involve transportation in an ambulance  

  employ medical practitioners, nurses and midwives in the department under their 
professional awards; and 

  dissolve three non-operational incorporated associations and the formal transfer of 
their assets to the appropriate Health Advisory Council. 

 
The introduction of licensing for stand-alone private day procedure centres will bring South 
Australia into alignment with other jurisdictions and give the Minister the power to grant 
licences, impose specific licence conditions and appoint inspectors to ensure that 
compliance with appropriate facility guidelines and safety and quality standards is 
enforced. The department is preparing a range of application and assessment resources 
and tools to support the implementation of the licensing regime on 1 May 2018.  
 
Assisted Reproductive Technology Act 1988 
The report for the legislated review of the Assisted Reproductive Treatment Act 1988 was 
tabled in Parliament in April 2017. The report made 47 recommendations to Government 
for more effective operationalisation of the Act, the establishment of a donor conception 
register, and the establishment of an Advisory Council. The Government is generally 
supportive of the recommendations. The department is progressing work to implement 
many of the recommendations and is further investigating the most effective approach to 
implementing a number of more complex recommendations.   
 
 
 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

 
South Australian Public Health Act 2011  
Section 110 of this Act specifies that the Social Development Committee of Parliament 
must review the operation of the Act after the expiry of five years from its commencement. 
 
The department commenced initial consultation with internal and local Government 
operational administrators of the Act and to date there have been many submissions for 
clarification and amendment against the existing Act.   
 
Public Intoxication Act 1984  
The Public Intoxication Act (Review Recommendations) Amendment Act 2016 
commenced on 1 March 2017. The Act amends the Public Intoxication Act 1984 in 
keeping with the Government s response to the Reynolds Review, and ensures that South 
Australia has a modern and effective legislative mechanism for managing persons 
intoxicated in a public place who are unable to take care of themselves.  
 
Significant consultation was undertaken throughout the development of the Public 
Intoxication Act 1984 (Review Recommendations) Amendment Act and there has been 
strong community consensus of support. The amendments include: 

  expressly stating the objects and principles of the Act to articulate its scope and 
intentions.  Harm minimisation and protecting public health is the primary goal of 
the Act 

  providing an expanded definition of a drug for the purposes of the Act to ensure 
people are protected from harm regardless of the intoxicating substance 

  adopting a definition of  public place  similar to that in the Summary Offences Act 
1953 to protect people who are intoxicated and unable to take proper care of 
themselves when they are on private property that is readily accessible to the 
public 

  extending the maximum period of detention by police to 12 hours but retains the 18 
hour maximum period of detention for declared sobering-up centres 

  protecting people involved in the administration of the Act from civil liability, 
provided their actions are in good faith  

  providing Statute law revision amendments. 
 

 
 

 

 

  

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Section B: Reporting required under any other act or 
regulation 
 

Food Act 2001 

Part 9   Administration 

Division 2   Functions of enforcement agencies 

S 93   Reports by enforcement agency 

(1) The head of an enforcement agency (other than the relevant authority) is to report to 
the relevant authority, at such intervals as the relevant authority requires, on the 
performance of functions under this Act by persons employed or engaged by the agency. 

Division 4   Agreement and consultation with local government sector on 
administration and enforcement of Act 
S 96   Agreement and consultation with local government sector 

(1) The Minister must take reasonable steps to consult with the LGA from time to time in  
relation to the administration and enforcement of this Act.  
(2) If the Minister and the LGA enter into an agreement with respect to the exercise of  
functions under this Act by councils, then the Minister must prepare a report on the  
matter and cause copies of the report to be laid before both Houses of Parliament.  
(3) A report under subsection (2) must be accompanied by a copy of any relevant written  
agreement between the Minister and the LGA.  
(4) The Minister must consult with the LGA before a regulation that confers any function  
on councils is made under this Act.  
(5) The annual report of the Minister under this Act must include a specific report on   

(a) the outcome of any consultation undertaken under subsection (1) or (4); and  
(b) the operation of any agreement referred to in subsection (2).  

Part 11   Miscellaneous 
S 109   Annual Report 

(1) The Minister must, on or before 30 September in each year, prepare a report on the  
operation of this Act for the financial year ending on the preceding 30 June.  
 
The objectives of the Food Act 2001 (the Act) are defined in Section 3 of the Act as: 

  Ensuring that food for sale is safe and suitable for human consumption. 
  Preventing misleading conduct in connection with the sale of food. 
  Providing for the application of the Food Standards Code. 
 

The Act closely follows the content and structure of national model food provisions, which 
provide for the consistent administration and enforcement of food legislation in Australia. 
This uniform approach to national food legislation was formalised by the Inter-
Governmental Food Regulation Agreement 2002. Under the Agreement all states and 
territories have adopted the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code  
(the Code) through their Food Acts. While the Act contains important legal and 
administrative issues, such as defining offences and penalties, the Code details the 
specific requirements with which food businesses must comply. 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

1. Activities of the Health Protection Operations Branch  
Health Protection Operations staff authorised under the Act are qualified Environmental 
Health Officers (EHOs) with extensive regulatory experience in rural, remote and 
Aboriginal communities. Geographically, these areas are typically very distant and often 
secluded. Health Protection Operations administer the Act in the  Out-of-Council Areas  
within South Australia ( unincorporated  and Aboriginal Lands; not serviced by a local 
council) and account for approximately 85% of the geographical area of the State.  
 
Table 1: Authorised Officers 

Authorised 
Officers 

Environmental Health 
Qualifications Full-time 

6 6 
 
Table 2: Food business and surveillance activity in 2016-17 

Area of Operation ~ 837 000 km  (? 85% of geographic area of SA) 
Number of Businesses 141 
Routine Inspections conducted 117 
Follow-up Inspections conducted 12 
Food Safety Audits conducted 6 
Complaint Inspections conducted 1 

 
Table 3: Enforcement actions 
Business Type Prohibition 

Order 
Improvement 

Notices 
Expiations 

Caterer 0 2 1 
Hotel/Pub/Tavern 0 2 1 
Roadhouse/service station 1 3 2 
Supermarket 0 2 0 
Total 1 9 4 

 2. Activities of the Food and Controlled Drugs Branch  
Monitoring Compliance with the Food Act 2001 
The Food and Controlled Drugs Branch (FCDB) conducts sampling surveys of various 
foods that are of public health concern, or to confirm compliance with the compositional 
and labelling requirements of the Code. A key performance indicator has been established 
to analyse 800 food samples per year. For 2016-17, a total of 860 food samples were 
taken consisting of 327 routine survey samples and 533 samples as part of foodborne 
illness investigations. Information about past and current surveys can be found on the SA 
Health website. 
 
Investigation of Food Safety Issues 2016-17 
During 2016-17, a number of significant food safety issues were investigated and are 
summarised further in this report.  
 
The FCDB collaborated with local councils on a total of 17 foodborne illness investigations 
after notification from CDCB. Details of some of the major outbreaks can be found in 
Section 3/Appendix 2 of this report. 
 
Investigations included onsite assessment of food handling practices in food businesses, 
sampling of food and environmental swabbing with the objectives to remove any risk to 
public health, establish the cause of the outbreak, ensure short and long term corrective 
actions are implemented and determine if an offence has been committed against the Act. 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Post Investigation Review 
In 2016-17, post incident debriefs to review the effectiveness of policies and procedures 
applied during incident investigation identified that projects on foodborne disease 
outbreaks undertaken in early 2016 had been implemented successfully in the last 
financial year.  
 
Food Recalls 
Food recalls conducted by all food businesses are nationally coordinated by Food 
Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ). The food business undertaking a recall is 
responsible for ensuring that the recall is carried out as soon as an issue is identified. The 
department informs EHOs statewide of the recall and requests that they check food 
businesses in their local council area to ensure food businesses are complying with the 
recall.  
 
FSANZ acted as coordinator for 61 food recalls during 2016-17. This consisted of nine 
trade level recalls, where the company has only provided product to distribution centres, 
wholesalers and food services. As the product has not been released in retail stores and 
could easily be retrieved a consumer level recall was not required. In three instances there 
were combined trade and consumer level recalls because there was a possibility a small 
amount of product may have been distributed. 
 
A further 49 recalls were consumer level recalls, where it was necessary to recover 
product from retail outlets and/or consumers. In total South Australia was affected by 29 
recalls where recalled product had been distributed in this state. 
 
Table 4 Summary of recalls conducted during 2016-17 
Type of Recall Reason for Recall SA Not 

Affected 
National SA and 

Other 
States 

Affected 

SA 
Only 

Consumer          49 
Trade                   9 
Consumer/Trade  
(combined)           3 
 
 
 

Undeclared allergens      34  
Micro contamination          7 
Chemical                           1 
Viral                                   1 
Biotoxin                             4 
Foreign matter                10  
Others                               4 

32 13 15 1 

Total                   61 Total                               61     
 
Enforcement Actions  
SA Health s Public Health Services Enforcement Framework on the SA Health website 
provides Authorised Officers with guidance about the manner in which enforcement 
activities are to be undertaken.  
  
Local Government is responsible for the conduct of routine food business inspections to 
verify compliance with chapter 3 of the Code (see Appendix 1). 
 
Where FCDB identifies noncompliance issues in food businesses, corrective actions are 
addressed through a graduated and proportionate response. Where warning letters are 
issued or reduced frequency of audit applied; once effective corrective action is confirmed 
no further enforcement action is undertaken. Should non-compliance remain unresolved, 
enforcement action can be escalated.  
 
 
 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Table 5 Summary of enforcement activities undertaken by FCDB during 2016-17 
Letters of 
Warning 

Expiations 
Issued 

Improvement 
Notices 

Emergency 
Orders 

Prosecutions 

3    0  0 1 0 
 
Table 6 Nature of Activities during 2016-17 
Category Number 
Alleged Food Poisoning 50 
Contamination  85 
General Enquiries 300 
Incidents 25 
Labelling 193 
CDCB Referrals 400 
New Business Information 49 
Food Recall enquiries 3 
Food - Resources Required - General 120 
Food - Standard 3.2.2  130 
Food - Standard 3.2.3  20 
Total 1375 

Food Safety Management 
National Food Safety Standard 3.3.1 (audited mandatory food safety programs for food 
services to vulnerable persons) became enforceable in SA in October 2008. 
 
The department has continued to liaise with industry, local government and food safety 
auditors to develop monitoring and review systems, to ensure effective management of 
the audit process in SA food businesses to whom this standard applies. 
 
In 2016 17, the department continued to conduct food safety audits of public hospitals, 
Department for Communities and Social Inclusion (DCSI) businesses such as Disability 
Services and Domiciliary Care and not-for-profit delivered meals organisations including 
Meals on Wheels. These facilities are audited at the frequency determined by the 
performance of individual sites, in line with the priority classification for these businesses.  
 
Table 7: Food audit statistics 

Risk Classification No of Businesses 
Routine 
Audits 

Public hospitals 72 64 
Not for profit delivered meals organisations 45 42 
Aged care / childcare audited in regional areas/ DCSI 12 10 

3. Food Borne Disease Investigations in South Australia 2016-17  
Epidemiological investigations into foodborne disease outbreaks within SA are coordinated 
by the Disease Surveillance and Investigation Section and OzFoodNet staff who are based 
within the CDCB of SA Health. OzFoodNet is a national network that conducts enhanced 
foodborne disease surveillance.  
 
During 2016-17, SA Health investigated seventeen outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness that 
were known or suspected to be foodborne and for which a common source was identified.   
The exposure settings for the outbreaks were varied and included eight associated with 
restaurants, two associated with bakeries, and one outbreak each was associated with an 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

institution, a commercial caterer, a school, a private residence and the general community 
(no set exposure place as the source was a widely distributed primary produce item). 
Additionally, two of the 17 foodborne outbreaks were spread across multiple states and 
territories (multijurisdictional outbreak investigations   MJOI) where a contaminated 
produce item was distributed in the community. 
 
In addition, 20 clusters of potentially foodborne illness for which no common source could 
be identified were also investigated during this timeframe. Fifteen of these clusters were 
caused by Salmonella, three by Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and two by 
Campylobacter. Hypothesis generating interviews were conducted with the majority of 
cases. This summary does not include clusters or outbreaks that were suspected to be 
person-to-person transmission, animal-to-person transmission, or from an environmental 
source (including swimming pools). All investigation data are subject to change, as this is 
the nature of clusters and outbreaks. 
 
Outbreak Investigations 
Further details about outbreaks investigated during 2016-17 and their exposure settings can 
be found in Appendix 2. 

Table 8:Summary of foodborne disease investigations in South Australia during 
2016-17  
No. Month 

and Year 
Organism Exposure 

setting 
Number 

ill 
Number 
laboratory 
confirmed 

Evidence 

1 July 2016 S. Hvittingfossa Community 33 33 D, S, M 
2 Aug 2016 STm 9* Restaurant 144 85 D, S 
3 Nov 2016 STm 135 Bakery 8 8 D 
4 Dec 2016 Campylobacter 

jejuni 
Commercial 
caterer 

11 6 D 

5 Dec 2016 STm 9 Restaurant 14 14 D, M 
6 Jan 2017 STm 135a Restaurant 6 6 D 
7 Feb 2017 STm 9 Restaurant 6 6 D 
8 Feb 2017 STm 135a Restaurant 9 9 D 
9 Feb 2017 STm 135a Restaurant 4 4 D, M 
10 Mar 2017 Campylobacter 

jejuni 
Restaurant 12 1 D 

11 Mar 2017 STm 12a Restaurant 13 13 D 
12 Mar 2017 STm 135a* Bakery 14 14 D, M 
13 Mar 2017 S. Hessarek Community 8 8 D, M 
14 Mar 2017 STm 135 Aged care 

facility 
13 13 D, S 

15 May 2017 STm 9 School 24 12 D, S 
16 May 2017 STm 8 Private 

residence 
5 3 D 

17 May 2017 Hepatitis Ab  Community 4 3 D, M 
No. = Number; D = Descriptive evidence (i.e. information obtained from interviewing cases and/or 
inspections of premises); M = Microbiological evidence (i.e. the same bacteria found in food or 
environmental samples as the unwell people); S = Statistical evidence (i.e. a significant statistical 
association is found between an exposure and the illness by conducting an analytical study); STm 
  Salmonella Typhimurium; *Outbreaks with multiple types of Salmonellae detected in cases, but 
predominant strain named in this table; aThis table includes SA cases only from the MJOI for S. 
Hvittingfoss; bThis table includes SA cases only from the MJOI for Hepatitis A. 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Cluster Investigations  
A summary of clusters investigated during 2016-17 are listed in Table 8. All clusters were 
general increases in specific infections in the community without a common point source 
identified and only descriptive evidence was available for all of the investigations. 
 
A cluster is defined as an increase in a specific infection in terms of time, person or place, where the 
source and mode of transmission remains unknown. 
 
Table 9: Summary of cluster investigations in South Australia during 2016-17   
No. Month and 

Year 
Organism Number ill 

1 Jun 2016 S. Infantis 10 
2 Jul 2016 STEC O113 4 
3 Jul 2016 S. Virchow 8 10 
4 Jul 2016 Campylobacter 6 
5 Oct 2016 STm 8 18 
6 Nov 2016 S. Chester 14 
7 Dec 2016 STm 108 19 
8 Dec 2016 Campylobacter 15 
9 Dec 2016 STEC O26 10 

10 Jan 2017 STm 9 95 
11 Feb 2017 STm 135 20 
12 Feb 2017 STm 135a 18 
13 Mar 2017 S. Reading 9 
14 Mar 2017 STm 9 7 
15 Mar 2017 STm 135 5 
16 May 2017 STm 9 13 
17 May 2017 S. Virchow 8 8 
18 May 2017 STEC O157 7 
19 May 2017 STm 135 7 
20 Jun 2017 STm 9 14 

STm   Salmonella Typhimurium; STEC   Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli. 
No. = number 

4. Biosecurity SA Activities under the Food Act 2001  
Biosecurity SA is a division of the Department of Primary Industries and Regions SA 
(PIRSA).The Primary Produce (Food Safety Schemes) (Meat Industry) Regulations 2006 
requires retail butcher shops to hold accreditation administered by PIRSA.   
 
Under the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between SA Health and PIRSA, both 
agencies share risk management principles that minimise regulatory burden and 
duplication. In practice to avoid duplication, retail butcher shops that sell food (other than 
meat) and conduct activities regulated under the Food Act 2001, are inspected by 
Biosecurity SA officers. There are a number of officers that have been appointed 
Authorised Officers under the Act.  
 
During 2016-17, 1012 audits were conducted by Biosecurity SA Authorised Officers on 
526 retail butcher shops, where a component of audits addressed other retail activities 
regulated under the Act. During the audits at retail butcher shops, 58 Corrective Action 
Requests were issued to 49 businesses which related to their food safety program, 
hygiene or construction and required follow up visits. No expiation notices or penalties 
were issued.  
 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

 

Safe Drinking Water Act 2011 

Part 8 - Miscellaneous 
50   Agreement and consultation with local government sector 
(1) The Minister must take reasonable steps to consult with the LGA from time to time in  
relation to the administration and enforcement of this Act.  
(2) If the Minister and the LGA enter into an agreement with respect to the exercise of  
functions under this Act by councils, then the Minister must prepare a report on the  
matter and cause copies of the report to be laid before both Houses of Parliament.  
(3) A report under subsection (2) must be accompanied by a copy of any relevant written  
agreement between the Minister and the LGA.  
(4) The Minister must consult with the LGA before a regulation that confers any function  
on councils is made under this Act.  
(5) The annual report of the Minister under this Act must include a specific report on   

(a) the outcome of any consultation undertaken under subsection (1) or (4); and  
(b) the operation of any agreement referred to in subsection (2).  

51   Annual report by Minister 
(1) The Minister must, on or before 30 September in each year, prepare a report on the  
operation of this Act for the financial year ending on the preceding 30 June.  
(2) The Minister must, within 6 sitting days after completing a report under  
subsection (1), cause copies of the report to be laid before both Houses of Parliament.  

52   Annual reports by enforcement agencies  
(1) An enforcement agency (other than the Minister) must, on or before 30 September in  
each year, furnish to the Minister a report on the activities of the enforcement agency  
under this Act during the financial year ending on the preceding 30 June.  
 
 
The objectives of the Safe Drinking Water Act 2011 (the Act) and Safe Drinking Water 
Regulations 2012 (the Regulations) are to: 

  ensure that drinking water supplied to South Australians is safe, 
  provide direction on how to achieve a safe drinking water supply, 
  implement principles of the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines, 2011 (ADWG)  

 
The Act requires: 

  registration of drinking water providers, 
  development and implementation of risk management plans (RMPs) for individual 

supplies, 
  audit or inspection of supplies, 
  reporting of incidents to the Department for Health and Ageing (the department), 
  provision of water quality results to the public on request. 

 
The department administers the Act with support from local Government. Within the 
department, the Water Quality Unit is responsible for day to day administration of the Act 
with assistance from the Health Protection Operations and Food Safety and Audit 
sections. 
 
 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Registration of drinking water providers 
During 2016-17, the department registered 24 new drinking water providers. Seven 
drinking water providers cancelled their registration. At 30 June 2017, there were 176 
drinking water providers registered with the department. Some providers include multiple 
supplies under one registration. SA Water s registration includes 75 water supplies, while 
the Department of Education and Child Development s registration includes 51 schools 
and preschools. 
 
As required under Section 11 of the Act, the department maintains a list of registered 
drinking water providers on the SA Health website. Councils are advised of drinking water 
providers within their area.  
 
Risk management plans 
All drinking water providers must have a Risk Management Plan (RMP) that includes an 
approved monitoring program and an incident protocol.  
 
During 2016-17 the department reviewed RMPs for new drinking water providers and 
provided assistance as required. An updated standard RMP for water carters was 
published on the SA Health website.  
 
Water quality incidents  
Under Section 13 of the Act, a drinking water provider s RMP must include a procedure for 
identifying, notifying and responding to water quality incidents. The department receives 
notification of incidents and provides advice and direction on remedial actions required to 
maintain safety of drinking water supplies. 
 
Incidents reported by SA Water 
 
SA Water incidents are reported according to the interagency Water/Wastewater Incident 
Notification and Communication Protocol. Under the Protocol, the department provides the 
Water Incident Coordinator. Incidents are classified as Priority Type 1, Type 1 or Type 2 
health incidents.  

  Priority Type 1 incidents   likely to require an immediate interagency meeting to 
develop responses and consider possible issuing of public advice. In the absence 
of appropriate interventions these incidents could cause serious risk to human 
health. 

  Type 1 water quality incidents   in the absence of appropriate intervention these 
incidents could cause serious risk to human health.  

  Type 2 incidents   represents a low risk to human health, but may provide 
preliminary warnings of more serious incidents.   

 
During 2016-17, the department received notification of two Priority Type 1 incidents, 48 
Type 1 incidents and 161 Type 2 incidents from SA Water. 
 
The department: 

  coordinated communication and responses to all Priority Type 1 and Type 1 
incidents 

  called interagency meetings and provided advice on operational responses for the 
two Priority Type 1 incidents. Both incidents involved the detection of potentially 
human infectious Cryptosporidium parvum at outlets of drinking water treatment 
plants 

  liaised with SA Water during Type 1 incidents to ensure remedial actions or 
responses were implemented in a timely manner.  

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

The department determined that responses to all Priority Type 1 and Type 1 incidents 
were effective and none represented a significant risk to public health. The department 
determined that no public notifications were required for these incidents. 
 
Reported Type 2 incidents were determined to be low risk and to not require further action 
by the department. 
 
Incidents reported by other drinking water providers 
 
In 2016-17 there were 19 drinking water incidents reported to the department by providers 
other than SA Water. The majority of incidents, 14 out of the 19 reported, were due to the 
detection of E.coli in rainwater tank supplies. The department provided advice on 
chlorination of water tanks and flushing of pipework with resampling of the water supply 
where required.  
 
Other incidents reported were due to loss of chlorine residual, high turbidity, high 
aluminium concentrations and bird access to a water storage tank. The incidents relating 
to high turbidity and high aluminium were from supply using surface water (River Murray 
water). At the time of the incidents floodwater from interstate was impacting on river water 
quality making treatment difficult to control. As a result bottled or cask water was supplied 
as an alternative for drinking and cooking purposes until control of water treatment 
improved.  
 
In each case appropriate responses were implemented.  
 
Approval of auditors and inspectors 
Auditors and inspectors are approved under Section 15 of the Act in line with established 
competency criteria. Approval as either a Level 1 Auditor, Level 2 Auditor or Level 3 
Inspector is based on technical skills and experience. The types of supply that can be 
audited or inspected by an individual are defined in approval conditions. 
 
In the past year the department: 

  approved one Level 2 Auditor and cancelled one existing approval; 
  conducted a training session for 14 prospective auditors and inspectors. Local 

Government employees and departmental staff attended. Online training was 
available for those unable to attend in person; 

  provided support and on-site training for local Government auditors and inspectors. 
 

At 30 June 2017 there were 35 approved auditors and inspectors including independent 
auditors, department staff, local Government employees and officers from the Dairy 
Authority of South Australia (DASA). The department maintains a list of approved auditors 
and inspectors on its website. 
 
Audits and inspections 
The Act requires that all drinking water providers are subject to an audit or inspection 
every year or every two years as described in a schedule published in the Government 
Gazette. Reports of all audits and inspections have to be submitted to the department. 
 
Under Section 20(4) of the Act the drinking water provider is responsible for ensuring the 
audit or inspection is carried out in accordance with the published schedule.  
 
The Water Quality Unit oversees the audit and inspection program and where possible 
coordinates drinking water audit and inspections with the activities of Health Protection 
Operations and the Food Safety and Audit section to avoid duplication and cost. Audits 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

and inspections are also performed by local Government and independent auditors. DASA 
undertakes inspections of independent drinking water supplies used by 10 dairy 
processors as part of existing audit activities.  
 
During 2016-17, a total of 86 audits and inspections of drinking water supplies were 
carried out with the department undertaking 42 of the audits and 29 inspections.  
 
Audits and inspections conducted by the department (small-medium sized drinking water 
providers) identified a number of non-compliances. These included incomplete RMPs and 
gaps in documentation of maintenance activities and water quality test results. None of the 
non-compliances resulted in a drinking water supply being declared unsafe. The 
department continues to provide advice and recommendations on improvements to 
maintenance and water treatment options for these providers. 
 
Quality of water and provision of results 
Under Section 27 of the Act, drinking water providers must make results of monitoring 
program available to the public.   
 
SA Water provides consumers with water quality information through publication of data 
on their website and in their annual report. Other drinking water providers can provide 
results to consumers on request by letter, email or telephone. 
 
Approval of laboratories 
No laboratories were approved during the reporting period.  Approved water quality testing 
laboratories are listed on the SA Health website. 
 
Administration and enforcement 
The Act incorporates enforcement provisions including the appointment of authorised 
officers with appropriate qualifications and experience. Department officers may also be 
authorised to carry out expiation notices under the Act and Regulations. 
 
In 2016-17 there was one new appointment of an authorised officer within the department.  
Authorised officers appointed by local Government are listed in Council annual reports 
(Appendix 3). 
 
At 30 June 2017 there were 15 authorised officers and 13 officers authorised to issue 
expiations for expiable offences. 
 
Consultation with local Government sector 
Under Section 50 of the Act, the Minister must take reasonable steps to consult with the 
Local Government Association (LGA) from time to time in relation to the administration 
and enforcement of the Act.  
 
During 2016-17 the department held discussions with the LGA to formalise the roles and 
responsibilities of the department and local Government in administering the Act. An 
exchange of letters clarifying the arrangement between the two parties and a package of 
resources will be developed in consultation with local Government. The department 
continues to work with local Government and provide support and training opportunities to 
facilitate the ongoing administration of the Act.   

 

 

  

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Carers Recognition Act 2005 

The Carers Recognition Act 2005 is deemed applicable for the following: Department for 
Communities and Social Inclusion, Department for Education and Child Development, 
Department for Health and Ageing, Department of State Development, Department of 
Planning, Transport and Infrastructure, South Australia Police and TAFE SA. 

Section 7   Reporting by reporting organisation 
(1) A reporting organisation must prepare a report on    
(a) the organisation s compliance or non-compliance with section 6; and  
(b) if a person or body provides relevant services under a contract with the organisation 
(other than a contract of employment), that person's or body's compliance or  
non-compliance with section 6. 
 
 
The SA Health Partnering with Carers Policy Directive was released during Carers Week 
in October 2015. 
 
In 2016-17, SA Health continues to collaborate and partner with Carers SA to progress he 
SA Health Partnering with Carers Strategic Action Plan 2016-19. The Strategic Action 
Plan oversees the state coordination and monitoring of the whole of health strategy which 
supports standardisation across SA Health in relation to Partnering with Carers Policy 
Directive. 
 
The action plan is designed to examine key issues and identify priorities relevant to 
partnering with carers and the community, and aligns with the SA Health Partnering with 
Carers Policy Directive. 
 
Key priorities under the Strategic Action Plan include: 

  early identification and recognition; 
  staff education and training; 
  carers are engaged as partners in care; 
  carers provide comments and feedback; 
  carer friendly workplace; 
  celebrate carers during National Carers Week. 
 

SA Health continues to work with the Local Health Networks to implement the SA Health 
Partnering with Carers Strategic Action Plan. 
 

 
 
 

 

 

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Section C: Reporting of public complaints as requested by 
the Ombudsman 
 

The information provided below is comprised of all SA Health complaints received (inclusive 
of LHNs and SAAS complaints). 

In 2016-17, the number of SA Health complaints reported into the Safety Learning System 
(SLS) was 6888. In some instances, one complaint may contain multiple complaint 
categories in addition to the primary complaint.  

The table below shows the number of complaints received for each category of complaint. 

Summary of complaints by subject 

Category of complaints by subject Number of instances 
Treatment 2570 

Communication 2370 

Access 2061 

Corporate Services 901 

Privacy / Discrimination 436 

Cost 356 

Professional Conduct 203 

Consent 110 

Grievances 100 

Total  9107 

 

Data for the past five years is available at: https://data.sa.gov.au/data/organization/sa-health 

 
Further information is available in the SA Health Patient Safety Report and the  
SA Health Patient Safety Report for Consumers and the Community on the Safety and Quality 
website at www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/safetyandquality - Safety and Quality Reports page. 
 

Complaint outcomes  
 

SA Health encourages patients, consumers, families, carers and the community to provide 
feedback. 
 
Feedback provides an opportunity for health services to observe the quality of health care 
from the perspective of patients, consumers, families, carers and the community. It also 
assists in directing improvement in the quality of these services. 
 
  

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2016-17 ANNUAL REPORT for the Department for Health and Ageing 

Consumers can provide feedback and express their concerns, complaints or compliments in 
person with the relevant health care service, via telephone, by writing, via the health care 
website or with the Consumer / Patient Adviser. Issues that cannot be resolved at the health 
care service may be forwarded to the Health and Community Services Complaints 
Commissioner (HCSCC). 
 
The SA Health Consumer Feedback and Complaints Management Policy Directive, 
Guideline and Toolkit assists in addressing consumer feedback and complaints, and 
provides a consistent approach to feedback and complaints management and feedback at 
all health sites. 
 
The Safety Learning System (SLS) Consumer Feedback Module is used to record all 
complaints, compliments, advice and suggestions in South Australia. The complaints 
received are categorised against the HCSCC Charter of Rights and national health 
complaints categories and sub-category definitions. 
 
As part of the consumer feedback awareness program, Safety and Quality developed the 
SA Health Partnering with Consumers and Community online eLearning course. 
Consumers in the videos talk about respect and dignity, receiving information, 
communication with health care professionals, and partnership in deciding on their care. 
These are all important aspects of partnering with consumers and consumer centred care 
approaches, which includes the consumers  right to provide feedback, and to comment or 
complain about the health care setting. 
 
The SA Health Consumer feedback process information sheet provides consumers and the 
community with a step-by-step process for providing feedback, and also provides a list of 
contacts for the individual health sites.  The information sheet is available on the Health and 
community services feedback and complaints page on the SA Health website 
www.sahealth.sa.gov.au  
 
 

 

 

 

 

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