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Best Practice Indicators for Health, 
Families SA and Childcare Staff

South Australian  
Safe Infant Sleeping

Standards



Acknowledgements
The Centre for Health Promotion, Children, Youth and Women s Health Service (CYWHS), Department 
of Health (DoH), acknowledges the valuable work of the South Australian Safe Sleeping Advisory 
Committee which provided expert advice, support and essential linkages. The Committee included 
representatives from:

 &gt; The Centre for Health Promotion, CYWHS

 &gt; Health Promotion Branch, DoH

 &gt; SIDS and Kids SA

 &gt; Kidsafe SA

 &gt; Child and Family Health, CYWHS

 &gt; Families SA, Department of Families and Communities (DFC)

 &gt; SA Health Injury Surveillance and Control Unit

 &gt; Child Death and Serious Injury Review Committee

 &gt; SA Maternal, Perinatal and Infant Mortality Committee 

 &gt; Aboriginal Health Division, DoH

 &gt; Association of Neonatal Nurses

 &gt; Australian College of Midwives

Most importantly, the Committee wishes to acknowledge the research carried out by Prof (Adj) 
Jeanine Young and Queensland Health identifying the important role health professionals play in 
the uptake of safe sleeping messages by parents. The Safe Infant Care to Reduce the Risk of 
Sudden Unexpected Deaths in Infancy Policy Statement and Guidelines developed by Queensland 
Health set the benchmark in terms of what can be achieved within a practice and policy document.

Special thanks go to SIDS and Kids ACT for their kind agreement to use their images throughout 
this document and supporting resources. 

The expert advice received by the Head of Gastroenterology at the Women s and Children s Hospital  
South Australia, Dr David Moore and supported by a Cochrane Review, regarding the placement of 
infants, including those with gastroesophageal reflux, on their backs to sleep on a firm, flat mattress 
that is not elevated (page 13) has provided much needed clarification for both medical and nursing staff. 

For more information
To obtain further information or copies of the Standards,  
please contact the Centre for Health Promotion  
Phone: (08) 8161 7777 
cywhshealthpromotion@health.sa.gov.au 
295 South Terrace, Adelaide SA 5000

March 2011.



Contents

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1

Classifications and explanation of terms .......................................................................... 2

Incidence ........................................................................................................................................... 3

Risk factors for SUDI, SIDS and fatal sleeping incidents ............................................ 3

About the standards of practice ............................................................................................ 5

The five safe infant care practices ........................................................................................ 6

The South Australian approach to co-sleeping .............................................................. 7

Standards

South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards ......................................................... 8

Appendices

Appendix 1: 
Additional best practice indicators specific to SA Health staff and volunteers .......................................... 13

Appendix 2: 
Additional best practice indicators specific to Families SA staff and volunteers ........................................ 15

Appendix 3: 
Additional best practice indicators specific to Department of Education and Children s Services  
  Early Childhood Services staff and volunteers  ..................................................................................... 17

Evidence

Challenges to meeting best practice, evidence and resources ............................ 18

Services and information

Quick guide for help .................................................................................................................. 27

Quick guide for information .................................................................................................. 31

References ...................................................................................................................................... 32





Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 1

Introduction
The sudden and unexpected death of infants during sleep has reduced significantly since a public  
health campaign about safe sleeping for infants was conducted in the 1990s. However, the sudden  
and unexpected death of infants during sleep remains a leading cause of preventable death for infants 
between one month and one year of age. The Maternal, Perinatal and Infant Mortality Committee 
(MPIMC) and the Child Death and Serious Injury Review Committee (CDSIRC) are two South Australian 
committees that investigate and document the circumstances surrounding deaths and serious injuries to 
children and make recommendations to Government. In 2006, these committees recommended a further 
public health campaign to highlight the risks within the infant sleeping environment and in 2008 they 
continued to identify co-sleeping and unsafe sleeping environs as risk factors in the infant deaths they 
reviewed. They also continued to identify a link between unsafe sleeping environments and socioeconomic 
disadvantage. Both Committees noted that hospital and community midwives and maternal child health 
nurses employed in the Universal Home Visiting program in South Australia had pivotal roles in discussing 
and checking safe sleeping arrangements for infants with families.1 These findings led to the Coroner, in 
June 2008, endorsing the recommendations of CDSIRC and further recommending that health professionals 
and carers be supported to  properly, accurately and consistently  promote and model safe sleeping practices 
to parents and families.2 

These South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards respond to the State Coroner s Recommendations 
made on 25 June 2008 to  develop a single set of consistent guidelines that define the appropriate 
strategies to be implemented by parents, carers and health professionals for the reduction of risk factors 
in sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI)  and to  enable members of the nursing profession, carers 
and other health professionals to properly, accurately and consistently impart to parents and families the 
essentials of safe sleeping practices for infants .2

Studies conducted with Queensland health professionals and nursing staff highlighted the importance  
of staff understanding and modelling of recommended practices to increase the uptake of safe sleeping 
messages by parents at home.3 7 Their studies found that improvements could be made to the information 
provided by staff to parents about modifiable risk factors in the infant s sleeping environment. In South 
Australia, a consultation with young parents suggests that inconsistencies between the information 
provided by health professionals and their practice causes confusion and some anxiety for parents. 

Queensland Health s Safe Infant Care to Reduce the Risk of Sudden Unexpected Deaths in Infancy Policy 
Statement and Guidelines note the unique position health professionals hold and the power they have  
 to directly influence the behaviour of parents and caregivers, by modelling safe infant sleep practices 
while the infant is in hospital and by providing parents with information and support strategies, to ensure 
parent practices used at home are consistent with public health safe sleeping recommendations .8

The five Standards contained in this document provide clarity and direction for staff and volunteers working 
with families and caregivers with infants under 12 months of age. This document is intended as a practical 
resource and outlines essential safe infant sleeping practices and environments alongside the respective 
challenges they pose for parents and staff. The Standards are informed by the available evidence about 
risk factors in the infant sleeping environment as well as current professional practice and consumer needs 
and apply to all families with infants from birth through to 12 months of age. 

The SA Safe Infant Sleeping Standards were developed by a core group of experts from Government and 
non-Government sectors in South Australia under the direction of the South Australian Safe Sleeping 
Advisory Committee. They are the result of extensive consultations and conversations, not only with 
members of the Committee, but also with local and interstate experts outside the Committee including 
consumers, retailers, staff within SA Health, Families SA, Disability SA, Department of Education and 
Children s Services (DECS) Early Childhood, Queensland Health and the Victorian Child Safety Commissioner.



page 2 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

The Standards were written to guide staff and increase family and community awareness of the key infant 
care practices associated with reducing the risk of infants dying while asleep. This document is informed 
by current Australian and international research and provides information consistent with the safe 
sleeping recommendations being promoted in many parts of the world. The decision to adopt a 
precautionary approach in South Australia, particularly in relation to co-sleeping, was not taken lightly. To 
the extent possible, the Committee has attempted to take account of all available evidence and arrived at 
an approach which they believe best supports the interests of public health. The safety of infants has been 
given the highest priority in formulating these recommendations.

Classifications and explanation of terms 
The definition of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) used in this document is based on the 
definition proposed by Fleming and others.9 This definition includes infants under one year of age  
whose deaths:

1. were unexpected and unexplained at autopsy;

2. occurred in the course of an acute illness that was not recognised by carers and/or health 
professionals as potentially life-threatening,

3. arose from a pre-existing condition that had not been previously recognised by health professionals, or

4. resulted from any form of accident, trauma or poisoning.

Sudden unexpected death in infancy could be described as an umbrella term with Sudden Infant Death 
Syndrome (SIDS) a subset of SUDI. The definition for SIDS currently accepted in Australia and by many 
experts internationally, is the San Diego definition proposed by Krous and others:10

 the sudden and unexpected death of an infant under one year of age, with onset of the lethal episode 
apparently occurring during sleep, that remains unexplained after a thorough investigation including 
performance of a complete autopsy and review of the circumstances of death and the clinical history .

The current definition of SIDS has become more stringent, such that some deaths which were attributed 
to SIDS in earlier years would now be classified as SUDI s in the  unexplained  group. 

SUDIs fall into one of two categories:

 &gt; explained deaths of infants which incorporate criteria 2 to 4 of the above definition, or

 &gt; unexplained deaths of infants accounted for by criteria 1 and incorporating the San Diego definition  
if SIDS proposed by Krous and others.

There are a number of known maternal, infant and socio-demographic risk factors which are common to 
SUDI and fatal sleep incidents. Research has clearly shown that the sleeping environment of infants can 
increase their risk of SUDI. For example infants who are placed to sleep on their front or side; who are 
exposed to tobacco smoke, both before and after birth; or who do not have a safe sleeping place are at  
a greater risk of sudden infant death.11



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 3

Incidence 
In Australia, infant deaths attributed to SIDS have fallen approximately 83% during the last 20 years.12 
Evidence suggests that the marked reduction in SIDS incidence can be directly associated with Australian 
public health campaigns which promoted safe sleeping practices, particularly advice to parents to place 
baby on their back to sleep.13 

The number of infant deaths attributed to SIDS has also fallen in South Australia during the period 
1989 2005, from 2.1 per 1,000 live births in 1989 to 0.2 per 1000 live births in 2006.14 In 2007 and 
2008 in South Australia, no sudden unexplained deaths in infancy have been attributed to SIDS.15 This is 
mostly attributed to the success of the SIDS and Kids Reducing the Risk of SIDS Campaign, but also to 
changing trends in classification. However, annually over the past few years there have been approximately 
10 sudden unexpected deaths in infancy associated with unsafe sleeping environments. This represents a 
significant number of preventable deaths. This incidence can be further reduced by continuing to improve 
parental practices with regard to sleeping environments. 

Figure 1: Post neo-natal death rates, South Australia 1986 2008 as reported in the Maternal, Perinatal and Infant Mortality in  
South Australia 2008 Report15

0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

19
86

 

19
88

 

19
90

 

19
92

 

19
94

 

19
96

 

19
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20
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20
02

 

20
04

 

20
06

 

20
08

 

D
ea

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All causes SIDS Non SIDS 

Risk factors for SUDI, SIDS and fatal sleeping incidents 
There are a number of factors that can increase the risk of an infant dying suddenly and unexpectedly 
during sleep. The level of risk increases significantly when a number of known factors are clustered in the 
infant s care or sleep environment.6,9,11,16 21

It is useful to consider risks within the three areas of infant characteristics, parental capacity and 
environment. Within these three areas, risks can be most easily addressed in the sleep environment 
although other protective factors can be identified to reduce the level of risk in other areas. 

Modifiable risk factors include:

 &gt; infant sleep position and sleep environment,

 &gt; smoking during pregnancy and after birth,

 &gt; alcohol and other drug use (including medications which cause drowsiness),

 &gt; co-sleeping with the infant on the same sleep surface (such as couch, bed or floor). 



page 4 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

Potentially protective factors include:

 &gt; sleeping the infant in the same room as the parents,

 &gt; immunisation,

 &gt; use of a pacifier (please note that if a pacifier is to be used it should be introduced after 6 weeks  
of age to ensure breast feeding is fully established first),

 &gt; breastfeeding.

There may be increased incidence also associated with infants who are:

 &gt; born prematurely (&lt; 37 weeks),

 &gt; of low birth weight (&lt; 2,500 grams),

 &gt; from multiple births,

 &gt; of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent,

 &gt; of young mothers (&lt; 20 years of age),

 &gt; of parents with mental health issues including depression,

 &gt; of parents with intellectual disability,

 &gt; experiencing neonatal health problems, including a history of minor viral respiratory infections and/or 
gastrointestinal illness in the days leading up to the death, 

 &gt; male and first born,

 &gt; born into families experiencing unstable or violent family relationships,

 &gt; born into unstable or transient living situations.

Significantly increased incidence is associated with infants who are born into families of low socio-
economic status, disadvantaged by occupational status, low educational level and unemployment.22

Protective factors for parents and caregivers can include the provision of appropriate support from 
agencies such as Families SA, Disability SA, mental health services, health or welfare agencies as well as 
access to extended family support, general practitioners and child and family health nurses.

It is important that workers and volunteers are able to identify risks and take appropriate action to 
mediate those risks. These Standards will assist workers and volunteers to:

1. Identify the risk factors and talk with families about those risks that can result in infants dying 
suddenly and unexpectedly whilst sleeping.

2. Promote and model to families evidence-based safe infant care practices and environments.

3. Provide families with relevant information on how to address identified risks and the reasons why  
safe infant care practices are important (using the Quick guide for information and the Challenges  
to meeting best practice sections).

4. Assist families to access relevant services, supports or referrals, or if necessary engage relevant 
services, supports or referrals on their behalf (using the Quick guide for help section).

5. Document discussions and actions taken with the family in the client record.

NOTE: Every agency is likely to have broader assessment frameworks which may include consideration of 
infant characteristics, parent capacity, environment and protective factors. It is always important to refer to 
your agency s specific guidelines to assist in the identification of risk factors, particularly where a combination 
of risks may be present.



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 5

About the standards of practice 
These Standards apply:

 &gt; To all SA Health, Families SA and Department for Education, Early Childhood Services staff, carers 
and volunteers whose work brings them in contact with families, parents and caregivers with infants 
under 12 months of age.

 &gt; To all settings across clinical, acute care and the community.

 &gt; In all circumstances unless medically indicated reasons state otherwise. 

These Standards aim: 

 &gt; To ensure staff in all facilities (i.e. antenatal, birthing, postnatal, paediatric, child health, childcare, 
community and general practice settings) promote and model safe infant care practices and 
environments consistent with the Standards.

 &gt; To ensure staff provide parents and caregivers with consistent and accurate information and the 
opportunity to observe recommended safe sleeping practices that take into consideration the needs 
of the baby and the family so that parents can implement these on return to their home environment.

 &gt; To support ongoing training and/or professional development activities that build the capacity of staff 
to model and promote safe sleeping best-practice.

These Standards ensure all staff are able to effectively promote and model the five safe 
infant care practices which ensure a safe sleeping environment. It is expected that all staff 
will comply with these Standards unless medically indicated reasons state otherwise.

Standard 1
All staff will place well infants under 12 months on their back to sleep from birth, never on the front 
(tummy) or side, unless there are medically indicated reasons.

Standard 2 
All staff will be fully informed about the risks of co-sleeping and promote the placing of infants for sleep 
in a Standards Australia compliant cot (AS/NZS 2172) in the same room as the parents for the first six to 
12 months.

Standard 3
All staff will consider the social and life circumstances of each family when promoting safe sleeping 
practices and ensure the information is provided in ways that are culturally accessible and can be easily 
understood by that family.

Standard 4 
All staff will ensure that expectant and new parents are made aware of the strong association  
between smoking and the increased risk of SIDS and are supported and referred to smoking cessation  
or reduction programs.

Standard 5
All staff will provide families, parents and caregivers with accurate information about a safe cot, with a 
safe mattress, safe bedding and in a safe environment.

This document lists Standards common to all workers and volunteers. Additional indicators apply 
to SA Health, Families SA and Early Child staff. See Appendices 1,2 and 3 for those additional 
indicators relevant to your organisation.



page 6 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

The five safe infant care practices
The following key infant care practices ensure a safe sleeping environment for babies up to 12 months of age:

1. Sleep infants on their back from birth for every sleep period (night and day), never on their front or side:

   with feet at the foot of the cot, 
   with appropriate bedclothes or sleeping bag which are the correct weight for the season to 

provide adequate warmth whilst avoiding overheating,
   with head and face uncovered,
   with bedclothes tucked in securely so bedding is not loose or in a sleeping bag that fits the neck firmly,
   without quilts, doonas, duvets, pillows, cot bumpers, sheep skins, soft toys or any other soft item 

which could pose an asphyxiation risk.

2. Avoid exposing babies to tobacco smoke before and after birth.

3. Sleep baby in their own cot in the same room as the parents for the first six to 12 months,

4. Provide a safe sleeping place night and day in a cot that is compliant with the Australian Standards for 
Household Cots (AS/NZS 2172)23 and positioned away from blind cords and other hazards.

Image courtesy of SIDS and Kids ACT

 3 Baby on back
 3 Keep head and face 

uncovered

 3 Keep baby smoke free 
before birth and after

 3 Sleep baby in a safe cot 
next to parent s bed

Although the current definitions and classifications presented in this document refer to an age limit of up to 
12 months and relate to the immediate sleeping environment (e.g. sleep positioning, cot), other items in or 
around the sleeping environment, such as blind cords or electrical cords, can pose a risk of strangulation for 
children of any age. These and other risks become more evident as infants become more mobile and capable 
of exploring their environment. For this reason it is important that parents continue to remain alert to risks in 
the sleeping environment throughout their child s developmental stages. 

Parents and carers of children with developmental delay or special needs are encouraged to consult with 
their child health specialist (ie. doctor, nurse, allied health worker) regarding the safest sleep practices for 
their child. It is always important to consider a child or infant s ability to move, lift and turn their head to 
breathe when choosing the most appropriate sleeping situation, cot, bed, bedding and temperature control. 
Staff should consider referring parents/carers to their child health specialist (i.e. doctor/nurse/allied health 
worker) for further information regarding infant safety issues as well as information in relation to the infant s 
overall health, development and wellbeing.

The safe infant care practices referred to in these Standards apply in all circumstances unless 
medically indicated reasons dictate otherwise. These Standards do not replace specific agency 
guidelines, protocols or procedures.



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 7

The South Australian approach to co-sleeping 
Although there may be divided opinions about co-sleeping, in South Australia we have chosen to present 
an approach that can be applied universally by staff to all parents and families. This approach is one of 
actively discouraging co-sleeping (sleeping on any surface with a baby). This approach is informed by 
evidence and ensures all families, regardless of their social and life circumstances, are provided with known 
best practices in relation to safe infant sleeping, the reasons why these practices are safest and the dangers 
and risks of practices which differ from those being promoted. Specifically these Standards do not  
support a harm minimisation approach to co-sleeping as this approach may inadvertently expose infants 
to unnecessary risks. On the other hand the Standards support room sharing, where infants sleep in a  
safe cot in the same room as their parents.

The South Australian position is to provide a clear, unambiguous message to parents (i.e. that co-sleeping 
with an infant increases the risk of infant death). It is based on an understanding that as part of their 
normal practice, professionals will provide information and education to parents about the behaviours  
and circumstances that may pose unintentional risks to their infants and the rationale for such advice.

The reasons that South Australia has taken this universal approach to co-sleeping include the following:

 &gt; Co-sleeping with infants increases the risk of infant death, particularly if the baby is of low birthweight 
or premature, if the mother has smoked during pregnancy or if adults in the household are smokers, 
if the baby is younger, if the co-sleeping adult has been drinking alcohol, taken medication or drugs 
or is very tired. Recent research has shown that co-sleeping is an independent risk factor for SUDI.24 26 
As an example, Tappin et al found the association between co-sleeping and infant death remained 
even if the mother did not smoke.25

 &gt; A substantial proportion of the Australian population, including parents, use drugs and alcohol. 
Parents of young infants are often fatigued. There is a high incidence of obesity in both women and 
men in Australia. Reducing these lifestyle risk factors is difficult as is attempting to individually tailor  
a message for particular families. 

These Standards support a clear, safe, universal message about co-sleeping.





Standards

South Australian Safe  
Infant Sleeping Standards

S
ta

n
d

a
rd

s





Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 8

South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

Standard 1
All staff will place well infants under 12 months on their back to sleep from birth, never 
on the front or side, unless there are medically indicated reasons.

Indicators of best practice:

To meet this Standard, all workers must be able to: 
1. Describe to parents with infants under 12 months of age how to place the infant on their back from 

birth for every sleep period (night and day):

   with feet at the foot of the cot,
   with appropriate bedclothes or sleeping bag which are the correct weight for the season to 

provide adequate warmth whilst avoiding overheating,
   with head and face uncovered,
   with bedclothes tucked in securely so bedding is not loose or in a sleeping bag that fits the neck firmly,
   without quilts, doonas, duvets, pillows, cot bumpers, sheep skins, soft toys or any other soft item 

which could pose an asphyxiation risk.

2. Provide parents and caregivers with evidence about the risks associated with side and front sleep 
positions (illustrated below). 

3. Provide parents and caregivers with advice about the importance of a firm sleeping surface (mattress).

4. Recognise when lack of appropriate sleep and settling strategies are contributing to unsafe sleeping 
practices and make relevant referrals based on the specific needs of the infant and the family 
circumstances. 

5. Explain to parents and caregivers the importance of supervised tummy time when the infant is awake  
(ie. to strengthen infant neck muscles and prevent a  flat head ).

6. Explain to parents and caregivers the dangers of positional aids, devices and rolls which are marketed 
to maintain infants in certain sleep positions in the sleep environment (such devices could pose an 
asphyxiation risk).

7. Recognise when referrals, supports and information are necessary to better support the parent or 
caregiver to provide a safe sleeping environment for their infant (see pages 27 30).

back side

tummy

Image courtesy of SIDS and Kids ACT



page 9 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

Standard 2
All staff will be fully informed about the risks of co-sleeping and promote the placing of 
infants for sleep in a Standards Australia compliant cot in the same room as the parents 
for the first six to 12 months.

Indicators of best practice:

To meet this Standard, all workers must be able to: 
1. Explain the risk factors (see pages 3 4) which contribute to the deaths of infants, particularly the risks  

of co-sleeping.

2. Describe to parents of infants aged under 12 months the benefits of room sharing and the risks of 
co-sleeping (see below).

3. Describe to parents the risks of co-sleeping whilst still encouraging breastfeeding, bonding and closeness 
before returning the infant to its own cot beside the bed.

4. Work in partnership with parents and caregivers to develop settling and sleep strategies which work 
best for the family or ensure a referral is made to Child and Family Health staff for assistance with 
this. Suggested strategies must take into account the families  social and life circumstances.

5. Link families with appropriate supports and resources, making referrals as necessary and documenting 
these in the client record (see page 27 30).

These are definitions of the terms used in this Standard:

Room sharing (RECOMMENDED)

Room sharing is defined as an infant sleeping in a 
Standards Australia compliant cot (AS/NZS 2172) in the 
same room as their parents. This is recommended for the 
first six to 12 months of life. Bed sharing when awake is 
defined as a parent taking their infant into bed in hospital 
or at home to feed, provide comfort and closeness and 
then to return the infant to a safe cot before the parent 
falls asleep.

Co-sleeping (NOT RECOMMENDED)

The term co-sleeping refers to mothers/partners (or 
any other person) sleeping on any surface (bed, sofa, 
couch or mattress) with a baby, whether with the 
intention to fall asleep or not. 

Please note that these definitions differ slightly from those proposed by UNICEF27 because of the new 
evidence regarding the protective effect of room sharing and because in the SA context we wish to make 
clear distinctions between sleeping with a baby (co-sleeping) and sharing the bed when awake with an 
infant to feed or cuddle (bed sharing).

Safest place for baby to sleep  
in a safe cot next to parent's bed

Image courtesy of SIDS and Kids ACT

 Co-sleeping with infants (whether in a bed or on a sofa, mattress or chair) should be strongly 
discouraged because it carries with it a clear risk of the infant dying particularly if the baby is of 
low birth weight or premature, or if adults in the household are smokers, or if the co-sleeping 
adult has been drinking, has taken medication or drugs or is very tired. 1 



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 10

Standard 3
All staff will consider the social and life circumstances of each family when promoting 
safe sleeping practices and ensure that information is provided in ways that are culturally 
accessible and can be easily understood by that family

Indicators of best practice:

To meet this Standard, all workers must be able to: 
1. Demonstrate they are able to promote the safe infant care practices recommended by SIDS and Kids 

in the format most appropriate for the individual family and caregiver.

2. Describe, particularly to  high needs  and vulnerable clients, including pregnant women, young 
parents and families from diverse cultural communities, where further evidence-based culturally-
appropriate information, services and resources related to safe infant sleeping can be accessed.

3. Work in partnership with families to identify any specific resources, information and services that  
may be required to meet the unique needs of the infant or the family circumstances.

4. Make referrals as appropriate, particularly where they have reason to believe the parent or caregiver  
is unable to understand the risks inherent in the sleep environment (e.g. due to language difficulties, 
intellectual disability or mental health issues).

5. When necessary, engage culturally appropriate supports: such as a person or service that has 
credibility with the family and is able to translate or convey the evidence-based safe infant care 
practices in the language or manner that is most suitable for that family (see pages 27 30).

6. Document in the client record any risks identified and referrals made.

The Translating and Interpreting Service provides professional translating 
services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week   phone 131 450 and quote your 
service s client number.

See pages 27 30 for services available to Aboriginal families.



page 11 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

Indicators of best practice:

To meet this Standard, all workers must be able to: 
1. Explain to expectant and new parents the harmful effects to the infant of smoking during pregnancy 

and second-hand smoke after birth.

2. Describe to families the importance of ensuring a smoke-free zone around pregnant women, infants 
and children to avoid them being exposed to tobacco smoke before and after birth. This includes the 
parent s bedroom when room sharing occurs.

3. Work in partnership with individuals to increase smoking disclosure and support them to stop or 
reduce smoking (e.g. the 5A s approach: Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, Arrange).

4. Provide pregnant women who smoke with Quit SA resources and referral information as appropriate 
to assist them to cease or reduce smoking (see page 27 30).

All community facilities will promote smoke-free displays and smoking cessation resources (e.g. antenatal 
and maternity outpatient clinics, postnatal wards, neonatal units, child care centres, etc).

All agencies will ensure educational messages relating to smoking are available to secondary care providers 
including day care and child care providers, grandparents, foster parents and babysitters.

Standard 4
All staff will ensure that expectant and new parents are made aware of the strong 
association between smoking and the increased risk of fatal infant sleeping incidents  
and that they are supported and referred to smoking cessation or reduction programs.

Image courtesy of SIDS and Kids ACT



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 12

Indicators of best practice:

To meet this Standard, all workers must be able to: 
1. Describe the dangers associated with a cot that doesn t comply with the Australian Standards for 

Household Cots (AS/NZS 2172) or is in poor condition, broken or damaged with missing slats.  
This includes:

   where the spacing between the bars may be too wide and trap a child s head or too narrow and 
trap a child s arms or legs,

   where the corner posts of the cot may be higher than the sides and ends creating a strangulation 
hazard if clothes get caught on any corner post,

   when the mattress does not fit snugly to within 20 mm of the sides and ends, and when pillows, 
toys and other items are not removed to prevent asphyxiation.

2. Explain, particularly to expectant parents and families with young infants, the Australian Standards for 
Household Cots and the importance of positioning the cot away from blind cords and other hazards.

3. Provide information about safe infant care practices and safe sleeping environments to parents and 
caregivers of infants under 12 months.

4. Consistently model safe sleeping environments in community settings.

5. Link families with appropriate supports and resources   make referrals as necessary and document this 
in client records (see page 27 30).

Standard 5
All staff will provide families and caregivers with accurate information about a safe cot, 
with a safe mattress, safe bedding and in a safe environment.





Appendices

Appendix 1: 
Additional best practice indicators 

 specific to SA Health staff and volunteers

Appendix 2: 
Additional best practice indicators  

specific to Families SA staff and volunteers

Appendix 3: 
Additional best practice indicators  

specific to Department of Education  
and Children s Services   Early Childhood  

Services staff and volunteers

A
p

p
e

n
d

ice
s





Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 13

Appendix 1: Additional best practice indicators specific to SA Health  
staff and volunteers

Standard 1: All staff will place well infants under 12 months on their back to sleep  
from birth, never on the front or side, unless there are medically indicated reasons.

To meet this Standard, all health workers must be able to:
1. Provide parents and caregivers with information on how to position infants safely in the cot and an 

explanation of the risks associated with side and front positioning.

2. Provide sleep and settling strategies that support parents and caregivers in ways that take into 
account the specific needs of the infant and the family circumstances.

3. Demonstrate the practice of placing all infants, including those with gastroesophageal reflux, on their 
back to sleep on a firm, flat mattress that is not elevated.

4. Provide parents and caregivers with strategies to manage gastroesophageal reflux effectively without 
placing the infant at risk.

5. Demonstrate the practice in neonatal units of placing premature and low birth weight infants on their 
backs as soon as their oxygen requirements allow and well before discharge.

6. Demonstrate, where a medical directive exists that requires the infant is not placed on their back to 
sleep in a health facility, that information is provided to parents or caregivers prior to discharge about 
the importance of placing baby on their back once home.

Standard 2: All staff will be fully informed about the risks of co-sleeping and promote the 
placing of infants for sleep in a Standards Australia compliant cot in the same room as 
the parents for the first six to 12 months.

To meet this Standard, all health workers must be able to: 
1. Work in partnership with parents and caregivers to identify settling and sleep strategies which take 

into account the families  social and life circumstances. 

2. Demonstrate that the birthing and post-natal facilities where they work model the placing of cots by 
the mother s bed (away from blind cords) and promote the return of infants to their cot after feeding 
and before parents fall asleep.

3. Demonstrate that discharge planning, in particular from postnatal or neonatal care units, takes into 
account risk factors (infant characteristics, parental capacity and environment) and ensures accurate 
information is provided and appropriate referrals are made in response to these.

4. Demonstrate that discharge planning, in particular from postnatal or neonatal care units, includes 
information for parents about the risks of co-sleeping and the benefits of room sharing.



page 14 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

Standard 3: All staff will consider the social and life circumstances of each family when 
promoting safe sleeping practices and ensure the information is provided in ways that 
are culturally accessible and can be easily understood by that family.

To meet this Standard, all health workers must be able to:
1. Specifically discuss the five safe infant care practices and intended infant sleeping environment with 

families prior to discharge. 

2. Discuss safe infant care practices and proposed sleeping arrangements with families on their return 
home and work in partnership with them to address any barriers to implementing safe infant care 
practices at home through the provision of culturally appropriate referrals, information and services 
based on the specific needs of the infant and the family.

Standard 4: All staff will ensure that expectant and new parents are made aware  
of the strong association between smoking and the increased risk of fatal infant  
sleeping incidents and that they are supported and referred to smoking cessation  
or reduction programs.

There are no additional indicators of best practice specific to health workers  
for this Standard. 

Standard 5: All staff will provide families and caregivers with accurate information about 
a safe cot, with a safe mattress, safe bedding and in a safe environment.

To meet this Standard, all health workers must be able to:
1. Provide information and appropriate referrals to parents and caregivers at each point on the care 

continuum   from the first antenatal contact until the end of infancy. 

2. Document information about discharge preparation and referrals to support safe infant sleeping on 
clinical care pathways and medical and nursing records for both parent and child.

3. Work in partnership with families to identify their reasons for being unable to provide a safe sleeping 
environment for their infant. These reasons could include cots given as family heirloom, financial 
constraints, high levels of transience, inadequate housing or other reasons.

4. Engage supports and referrals as appropriate.



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 15

Appendix 2: Additional best practice indicators specific to Families SA  
staff and volunteers
All staff have a duty of care which extends beyond the individual child and includes other family members. 

The role of Families SA, as the statutory child protection agency within the Department for Families and 
Communities, is to provide assessment, education and support to parents and carers aimed at preventing 
sudden and unexpected infant death. Where the parenting environment has been assessed as being unsafe, 
Families SA may take action to secure the care and protection of an infant under the Children s Protection 
Act, 1993. Families SA workers, foster carers and contracted alternative care service provider staff must 
adhere to the relevant policies, procedures and practices including:

 &gt; Aboriginal Child Placement Principle Policy,

 &gt; Care and Protection Assessment Framework Policy,

 &gt; Care and Protection Assessment Framework Practice Guidelines for Investigation and Assessment,

 &gt; Families SA safe sleeping procedure,

 &gt; Families SA Duty of Care for Children and Young People in Care Policy and Practice Guide,

 &gt; Relative Kinship and Specific Child Only Care Policy,

 &gt; Standards of Alternative Care in South Australia (specifically standard 3.7.1).

Standard 1: All staff will place well infants under 12 months on their back to sleep from 
birth, never on the front or side, unless there are medically indicated reasons

Best practice indicators
1. Foster carers, relative/kinship carers and contracted alternative care service provider staff who care for 

infants are informed about, and implement safe sleeping practices for infants under 12 months. 

2. Foster carers, relative/kinship carers and contracted alternative care service providers staff who care for 
infants must seek advice from medical staff about positioning infants safely where a medical directive 
exists that requires the infant not to be placed on their back to sleep.

Standard 2: All staff will be fully informed about the risks of co-sleeping and promote the 
placing of infants for sleep in a Standards Australia compliant cot in the same room as 
the parents for the first six to 12 months.

Best practice indicators
1. When investigating a notification, Families SA staff must sight the infant, view the infants sleeping 

environment and discuss the sleeping arrangements with the infant s caregivers. 

2. This is undertaken as part of the child protection assessment process, or it can be incorporated into 
an already existing assessment process (e.g. drug and alcohol assessment) which should explore how 
caregivers who use drugs and/or alcohol will mitigate risks to their infants safe sleeping.

3. It is recommended that Families SA staff demonstrate safe sleeping techniques to support caregivers 
understanding of the importance of providing safe sleeping environments to their infants.



page 16 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

Standard 3: All staff will consider the social and life circumstances of each family when 
promoting safe sleeping practices and ensure the information is provided in ways that 
are culturally accessible and can be easily understood by that family.

Best practice indicators
1. Families SA recognises that families who are disadvantaged and marginalised may be harder to reach 

using traditional public health education strategies and therefore require more direct intervention to 
ensure that safe sleeping strategies are understood and implemented. 

2. Families SA staff must promote safe sleeping depending on the family s circumstances (and unless it 
is not required due to good practices already being in place) including recommending that parents/
carers do not sleep with their infant due to risks associated with substance abuse, overlaying by another 
person and suffocation from pillows and blankets.

3. Families SA staff will consult with the Principal Aboriginal Consultant to ensure engagement with 
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families/carers/kin/ community is supported in a culturally 
appropriate manner.

4. Staff must document in the investigation notes on C3MS what safe sleeping promotion was undertaken 
with the parents/carers, or why safe sleeping promotion was not required (i.e. the parents/carers were 
already practicing safe sleeping strategies).

Standard 4: All staff will ensure that expectant and new parents are made aware of the 
strong association between smoking and increased risk of fatal infant sleeping incidents 
and they are supported and referred to smoking cessation or reduction program.

Best practice indicators
Families SA staff will work in partnership with parents/carers to ensure that they are aware of the 
increased risk of SIDS associated with smoking and support them to engage with programs to address 
their smoking behaviour.

Standard 5: All staff will provide families and caregivers with accurate information about 
a safe cot, with a safe mattress, safe bedding and safe environment.

Best practice indicators
1. There may be many reasons why families do not have safe cots or goods to provide a safe sleeping 

environment for their infants. Staff must work in partnership with families to identify the reasons for 
this such as financial constraints, high levels of transience, inadequate housing or other reasons.

2. Families who are disadvantaged may also find it harder to adapt their home environment to militate 
against the risk of SUDI, and therefore may require additional support to do so.

3. Where assessed to be appropriate, Families SA workers should consider integrated practice with 
Families SA Anti-poverty teams to assess the family s financial difficulties/needs and assist the family  
to obtain safe cots, baby sleeping bags or appropriate bedding.

4. Staff must document what safe sleeping promotion was undertaken with the caregiver.

5. Staff must document the parents/carers willingness and capacity to meet the needs of the infant as 
part of the overall assessment of risk to the infant. 



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 17

Appendix 3: Additional best practice indicators specific to Department  
of Education and Children s Services   Early Childhood Services staff  
and volunteers 
It is important to acknowledge the critical role early childhood workers play in promoting and modelling 
safe sleeping practices and environments to families with infants.

The South Australian Safe Sleeping Standards have important implications for both Childcare Centres and 
Family Day Care workers in relation to the onus they place on staff and family day care providers to model 
and promote accurate information to parents about:

 &gt; placing infants under 12 months of age in an Australian Standards compliant cot, away from blind 
cords, with appropriate supervision and lighting, 

 &gt; sleeping baby on back, the effects of smoking and the risks of co-sleeping, and 

 &gt; conveying this in a way that parents of infants in their care can understand.

NB: It is important to note that a National Standard for Early Childhood Services (covering Family Day Care 
and Child Care Centres) is currently under development and will include safe sleeping. Once these National 
Standards have been developed, they will be linked with the accreditation of services from January 2012. 
All staff and family day care workers will be governed by these National Standards for Early Childhood 
Services (relevant section) and any other legislation, policies, procedures or guidelines that support the 
safety of infants particularly in the sleeping environment.





Evidence

Challenges to meeting best  
practice, evidence and resources

E
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Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 18

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Standard 1: All staff will place well infants under 12 months on their back to sleep 
from birth, never on the front or side, unless there are medically indicated reasons



page 19 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

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or
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r 
yo

ur
 

fr
ee

 c
op

y

 T
um

m
y 

tim
e 

 b
ro

ch
ur

e 
av

ai
la

bl
e 

fr
om

 S
ID

S 
an

d 
K

id
s 

SA
 P

h:
 8

36
9 

01
55

 
&gt;

In
co

ns
is

te
nt

 r
ol

e 
m

od
el

lin
g 

 
by

 s
ta

ff
 c

on
fli

ct
s 

w
ith

 t
he

se
 

re
co

m
m

en
da

tio
ns

.

M
an

y 
in

fa
nt

s 
in

 n
eo

na
ta

l s
pe

ci
al

 c
ar

e 
un

its
 a

re
 p

la
ce

d 
on

 t
he

ir 
fr

on
t 

or
 s

id
e 

fo
r 

m
ed

ic
al

 
re

as
on

s.
 H

ow
ev

er
, p

re
m

at
ur

e 
an

d 
lo

w
 b

irt
h 

w
ei

gh
t 

in
fa

nt
s 

ar
e 

pl
ac

ed
 o

n 
th

ei
r 

ba
ck

s 
as

 
so

on
 a

s 
th

ei
r 

ox
yg

en
 re

qu
ire

m
en

ts
 a

llo
w

 a
nd

 w
el

l b
ef

or
e 

di
sc

ha
rg

e,
 t

o 
en

su
re

 t
ha

t 
th

e 
in

fa
nt

 a
nd

 p
ar

en
ts

 a
re

 a
cc

us
to

m
ed

 t
o 

th
e 

in
fa

nt
 b

ei
ng

 p
la

ce
d 

on
 it

s 
ba

ck
 t

o 
sl

ee
p.

 
&gt;

O
bs

er
va

tio
n 

on
 t

el
ev

is
io

n 
or

 
th

ro
ug

h 
ot

he
r 

m
ed

ia
 w

hi
ch

 
su

gg
es

ts
 f

ro
nt

 o
r 

si
de

 s
le

ep
in

g 
 

of
 in

fa
nt

s 
is

 s
af

e.

It 
is

 s
om

et
im

es
 im

pl
ie

d 
du

rin
g 

ad
ve

rt
is

em
en

ts
 o

r 
te

le
vi

si
on

 p
ro

gr
am

s 
th

at
 it

 is
 s

af
e 

to
 

pl
ac

e 
ba

by
 o

n 
th

e 
tu

m
m

y 
or

 s
id

e 
to

 s
le

ep
. T

he
 s

id
e 

sl
ee

pi
ng

 p
os

iti
on

 is
 u

ns
ta

bl
e 

an
d 

th
er

ef
or

e 
in

cr
ea

se
s 

th
e 

ris
k 

of
 S

ID
S 

by
 t

w
o 

to
 f

ou
r 

tim
es

, a
tt

rib
ut

ed
 m

ai
nl

y 
to

 t
he

 s
id

e 
po

si
tio

n 
be

in
g 

re
la

tiv
el

y 
un

st
ab

le
, r

es
ul

tin
g 

in
 s

om
e 

in
fa

nt
s 

ro
lli

ng
 t

o 
th

e 
tu

m
m

y 
po

si
tio

n 
du

rin
g 

sl
ee

p 
an

d 
as

ph
yx

ia
tin

g.
 S

id
e 

sl
ee

pi
ng

 is
 n

ot
 r

ec
om

m
en

de
d 

as
 a

 s
af

e 
al

te
rn

at
iv

e 
to

 s
le

ep
in

g 
on

 t
he

 b
ac

k.
 P

os
iti

on
in

g 
de

vi
ce

s 
ar

e 
al

so
 n

ot
 r

ec
om

m
en

de
d.

Standard 1 cont...



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 20

Standard 2: All staff will be fully informed about the risks of co-sleeping and 
promote the placing of infants for sleep in a Standards Australia compliant cot  
in the same room as the parents for the first six to 12 months

C
h

al
le

n
g

es
 in

 m
ee

ti
n

g
  

b
es

t-
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Ev
id

en
ce

 s
u

p
p

o
rt

in
g

 b
es

t 
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Su
p

p
o

rt
 a

n
d

 r
es

o
u

rc
es

Fa
m

ili
es

 m
ay

 s
it

e 
re

as
o

n
s 

fo
r 

co
-s

le
ep

in
g 

an
d 

no
t 

ro
om

-s
ha

ri
ng

. 
Th

es
e 

m
ay

 in
cl

u
d

e:

In
fa

n
ts

 a
re

 m
o

re
 a

t 
ri

sk
 o

f 
SU

D
I a

n
d

 f
at

al
 s

le
ep

in
g

 a
cc

id
en

ts
 w

h
en

  
co

-s
le

ep
in

g
 o

cc
u

rs

 &gt;
Be

in
g 

to
o 

tir
ed

 o
r e

xh
au

st
ed

 to
 

re
tu

rn
 b

ab
y 

to
 t

he
 c

ot
 a

ft
er

 
br

ea
st

fe
ed

in
g.

 
&gt;

H
av

in
g 

tr
ou

bl
e 

se
tt

lin
g 

th
ei

r 
ba

by
.

 
&gt;

Fa
lli

ng
 a

sl
ee

p 
un

in
te

nt
io

na
lly

  
on

 t
he

 c
ou

ch
.

It 
is

 n
ot

 s
af

e 
fo

r 
an

yb
od

y 
to

 f
al

l a
sl

ee
p 

w
ith

 a
 b

ab
y 

on
 t

he
 s

am
e 

sl
ee

p 
su

rf
ac

e.
34

 

Pl
ac

in
g 

a 
ba

by
 t

o 
sl

ee
p 

or
 f

al
lin

g 
as

le
ep

 t
og

et
he

r 
w

ith
 a

 b
ab

y 
on

 a
 s

of
a 

or
 c

ou
ch

 

is
 e

xt
re

m
el

y 
ha

za
rd

ou
s.

 T
he

re
 is

 a
 g

re
at

ly
 e

le
va

te
d 

ris
k 

of
 in

fa
nt

 d
ea

th
 a

nd
 s

le
ep

in
g 

ac
ci

de
nt

s 
w

he
n 

a 
ba

by
 s

ha
re

s 
a 

so
fa

 o
r 

co
uc

h 
w

ith
 a

n 
ad

ul
t 

du
rin

g 
sl

ee
p.

 T
he

 r
is

ks
 

ar
e 

in
cr

ea
se

d 
w

he
n 

th
e 

pa
re

nt
 o

r 
fa

m
ily

 m
em

be
r 

is
 u

nd
er

 t
he

 in
flu

en
ce

 o
f 

al
co

ho
l 

an
d/

or
 o

th
er

 d
ru

gs
 o

r 
un

de
r 

th
e 

in
flu

en
ce

 o
f 

m
ed

ic
at

io
n 

th
at

 c
au

se
s 

sl
ee

pi
ne

ss
 a

nd
 

th
ey

 c
o-

sl
ee

p.

Se
e 

A
de

la
id

e 
N

ow
 a

rt
ic

le
 o

n 
C

or
on

er
 s 

Fi
nd

in
gs

 2
01

0 
 

w
w

w
.a

de
la

id
en

ow
.c

om
.a

u/
ne

w
s/

so
ut

h-
au

st
ra

lia
/p

ar
en

ts
-w

ar
ne

d-
on

-
co

t-
de

at
h-

da
ng

er
s-

of
-s

ha
rin

g-
be

ds
-

w
ith

-b
ab

ie
s/

st
or

y-
e6

fr
ea

83
-1

22
59

32
20

70
35

SI
D

S 
an

d 
K

id
s 

(2
00

7)
 In

fo
rm

at
io

n 
st

at
em

en
t 

on
 t

he
 d

an
ge

rs
 o

f 
co

-s
le

ep
in

g:
 S

le
ep

in
g 

w
ith

 a
 b

ab
y 

Se
pt

, 2
00

7.
 C

an
be

rr
a:

  
w

w
w

.s
id

sa
nd

ki
ds

.o
rg

 
&gt;

Fr
eq

ue
nt

 c
ha

ng
es

 t
o 

in
fa

nt
 

ro
ut

in
es

 a
nd

 u
su

al
 s

le
ep

in
g 

en
vi

ro
nm

en
ts

 le
ad

 t
o 

di
ffi

cu
lty

 
se

tt
lin

g.

W
he

n 
in

fa
nt

s 
be

co
m

e 
un

se
tt

le
d 

an
d 

ha
ve

 t
ro

ub
le

 s
le

ep
in

g,
 p

ar
en

ts
 m

ay
 b

e 
te

m
pt

ed
 

to
 c

o-
sl

ee
p 

w
ith

 t
he

ir 
in

fa
nt

. P
ar

en
ts

 w
ill

 b
en

efi
t 

fr
om

 s
et

tli
ng

 id
ea

s 
w

hi
ch

 c
an

 b
e 

fo
un

d 
in

 t
he

 S
le

ep
 P

ar
en

t 
Ea

sy
 G

ui
de

.

A
 b

as
si

ne
tt

e 
or

 t
ra

ve
l c

ot
 w

hi
ch

 h
as

 b
ee

n 
sp

ec
ifi

ca
lly

 d
es

ig
ne

d 
as

 a
n 

in
fa

nt
 s

le
ep

in
g 

en
vi

ro
nm

en
t 

ca
n 

be
 u

se
d 

fo
r 

da
yt

im
e 

sl
ee

ps
 a

nd
 m

ov
ed

 f
ro

m
 r

oo
m

 t
o 

ro
om

 o
r 

us
ed

 
w

he
n 

vi
si

tin
g 

or
 m

ov
in

g 
fr

om
 o

ne
 h

ou
se

 t
o 

an
ot

he
r. 

A
 p

or
ta

co
t 

sh
ou

ld
 o

nl
y 

be
 u

se
d 

w
ith

 t
he

 t
hi

n 
m

at
tr

es
s 

w
hi

ch
 it

 c
om

es
 w

ith
. N

o 
ot

he
r 

m
at

tr
es

s 
or

 p
ad

di
ng

 s
ho

ul
d 

be
 

ad
de

d 
to

 t
he

 p
or

ta
co

t.
 T

he
 m

at
tr

es
s 

w
hi

ch
 t

he
 p

or
ta

co
t 

co
m

es
 w

ith
 is

 d
es

ig
ne

d 
to

 
pr

ov
id

e 
ad

eq
ua

te
 c

om
fo

rt
 f

or
 t

he
 in

fa
nt

.

C
ar

 s
ea

ts
, b

ou
nc

in
et

te
s,

 h
am

m
oc

ks
, b

ea
n 

ba
gs

, p
ill

ow
s 

an
d 

so
fa

s 
(a

rm
ch

ai
rs

, l
ou

ng
es

, 
co

uc
he

s)
 a

re
 n

ot
 d

es
ig

ne
d 

as
 s

le
ep

in
g 

en
vi

ro
nm

en
ts

 f
or

 b
ab

ie
s 

an
d 

ar
e 

no
t 

be
 u

se
d 

fo
r 

th
at

 p
ur

po
se

.

K
id

sa
fe

 S
A

 c
an

 p
ro

vi
de

 a
dv

ic
e 

 
on

 t
he

 u
se

 o
f 

po
rt

ab
le

/t
ra

ve
l c

ot
s 

Ph
: 8

16
1 

63
18

 

Pa
re

n
ti

n
g

 S
A

 h
av

e 
in

fo
rm

at
io

n 
on

 
sl

ee
p 

an
d 

se
tt

lin
g 

in
 t

he
ir 

Pa
re

nt
 

Ea
sy

 G
ui

de
  

 
w

w
w

.p
ar

en
tin

g.
sa

.g
ov

.a
u/

pe
gs

/
PE

G
34

.p
df

 a
nd

 a
ls

o 
w

w
w

.c
yh

.c
om

Pa
re

n
t 

H
el

p
lin

e 
ca

n 
pr

ov
id

e 
ad

vi
ce

 a
nd

 s
up

po
rt

 2
4 

ho
ur

s 
a 

da
y 

7 
da

ys
 a

 w
ee

k 
 

Ph
: 1

30
0 

36
4 

10
0



page 21 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

C
h

al
le

n
g

es
 in

 m
ee

ti
n

g
  

b
es

t-
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Ev
id

en
ce

 s
u

p
p

o
rt

in
g

 b
es

t 
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Su
p

p
o

rt
 a

n
d

 r
es

o
u

rc
es

Fa
m

ili
es

 m
ay

 s
it

e 
re

as
o

n
s 

fo
r 

co
-s

le
ep

in
g

 a
n

d
 n

o
t 

ro
o

m
-

sh
ar

in
g

. T
h

es
e 

m
ay

 in
cl

u
d

e:

In
fa

n
ts

 a
re

 m
o

re
 a

t 
ri

sk
 o

f 
SU

D
I a

n
d

 f
at

al
 s

le
ep

in
g

 a
cc

id
en

ts
 w

h
en

  
co

-s
le

ep
in

g
 o

cc
u

rs

 
&gt;

H
is

to
ric

al
ly

 a
nd

 c
ul

tu
ra

lly
 

co
-s

le
ep

in
g 

w
ith

 in
fa

nt
s 

is
 

co
ns

id
er

ed
 t

he
 n

or
m

.

 
&gt;

Pa
re

nt
s,

 p
ar

tic
ul

ar
ly

 t
ho

se
 f

or
 

w
ho

m
 E

ng
lis

h 
is

 a
 s

ec
on

d 
la

ng
ua

ge
, m

ay
 n

ot
 b

e 
aw

ar
e 

 
of

 t
he

 r
is

ks
 o

f 
co

-s
le

ep
in

g.

 
&gt;

La
ck

 o
f 

fu
nd

s 
to

 p
ur

ch
as

e 
a 

co
t

 
&gt;

N
o 

ro
om

 f
or

 a
 c

ot
 in

 t
he

 p
ar

en
t s

 
be

dr
oo

m
.

 
&gt;

La
ck

 o
f 

st
ab

le
 h

ou
si

ng
.

 
&gt;

O
ve

rc
ro

w
di

ng
, w

ith
 m

an
y 

ch
ild

re
n 

sh
ar

in
g 

th
e 

sa
m

e 
be

d.

D
es

pi
te

 t
he

 p
ra

ct
ic

e 
of

 s
ha

rin
g 

a 
sl

ee
p 

su
rf

ac
e 

w
ith

 b
ab

y 
be

in
g 

co
m

m
on

 in
 c

ul
tu

ra
lly

 
di

ve
rs

e 
co

m
m

un
iti

es
, C

or
on

ia
l i

nq
ue

st
s 

ha
ve

 d
et

er
m

in
ed

 t
ha

t 
co

-s
le

ep
in

g 
is

 a
 r

is
k 

to
 

al
l i

nf
an

ts
 in

cl
ud

in
g 

th
os

e 
fr

om
 c

ul
tu

ra
lly

 d
iv

er
se

 b
ac

kg
ro

un
ds

.

A
lth

ou
gh

 it
 m

ay
 s

ee
m

 d
iffi

cu
lt,

 it
 is

 e
ss

en
tia

l t
ha

t 
st

af
f 

pr
ov

id
e 

al
l f

am
ili

es
 w

ith
 

in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

ab
ou

t 
th

e 
ris

ks
 o

f 
co

-s
le

ep
in

g 
an

d 
th

e 
be

ne
fit

s 
of

 r
oo

m
-s

ha
rin

g 
re

ga
rd

le
ss

 o
f 

th
e 

fa
m

ily
 s 

cu
ltu

ra
l b

ac
kg

ro
un

d.

A
ll 

fa
m

ili
es

, p
ar

tic
ul

ar
ly

 t
ho

se
 f

ro
m

 d
iv

er
se

 b
ac

kg
ro

un
ds

, n
ee

d 
to

 b
e 

aw
ar

e 
th

at
 t

he
 

ris
ks

 o
f 

co
-s

le
ep

in
g 

w
ith

 in
fa

nt
s 

un
de

r 
12

 m
on

th
s 

ar
e 

in
cr

ea
se

d 
w

he
n 

pr
ot

ec
tiv

e 
fa

ct
or

s 
su

ch
 a

s 
a 

fir
m

 m
at

tr
es

s 
or

 m
at

 o
n 

th
e 

flo
or

 a
re

 s
ub

st
itu

te
d 

w
ith

 s
of

te
r 

sl
ee

pi
ng

 s
ur

fa
ce

s.
 

A
ll 

pa
re

nt
s 

al
so

 n
ee

d 
to

 b
e 

pa
rt

ic
ul

ar
ly

 a
w

ar
e 

of
 t

he
 r

is
ks

 o
f 

co
-s

le
ep

in
g 

an
d 

sm
ok

in
g.

W
he

re
 p

os
si

bl
e:

 

1.
 A

sk
 t

he
 p

ar
en

ts
 o

r 
ca

re
gi

ve
rs

 a
bo

ut
 t

he
 b

ab
y 

s 
sl

ee
p 

en
vi

ro
nm

en
t 

at
 h

om
e.

2.
 If

 t
he

 c
ar

eg
iv

er
 c

on
se

nt
s 

an
d 

if 
ho

m
e 

vi
si

tin
g 

ta
ke

s 
pl

ac
e,

 t
ak

e 
a 

lo
ok

 a
t 

th
e 

in
fa

nt
 s 

sl
ee

pi
ng

 p
la

ce
.

3.
 W

he
th

er
 it

 is
 o

bv
io

us
 t

ha
t 

co
-s

le
ep

in
g 

is
 o

cc
ur

rin
g 

or
 n

ot
, d

is
cu

ss
 t

he
 r

is
ks

 o
f 

co
-s

le
ep

in
g 

an
d 

th
e 

be
ne

fit
s 

of
 r

oo
m

 s
ha

rin
g 

(in
cl

ud
in

g 
br

ea
st

fe
ed

in
g)

.

4.
 N

ot
e 

th
e 

di
sc

us
si

on
 in

 t
he

 c
as

e 
no

te
s 

an
d 

en
su

re
 r

el
ev

an
t 

su
pp

or
ts

 a
nd

 s
er

vi
ce

s 
ha

ve
 b

ee
n 

en
ga

ge
d.

M
at

er
na

l a
w

ar
en

es
s 

of
 t

he
 r

is
k 

fa
ct

or
s 

as
so

ci
at

ed
 w

ith
 S

ID
S 

an
d 

fa
ta

l s
le

ep
in

g 
in

ci
de

nt
s 

is
 li

ke
ly

 t
o 

be
 lo

w
er

 w
he

re
 E

ng
lis

h 
is

 a
 s

ec
on

d 
la

ng
ua

ge
 o

r 
he

al
th

 li
te

ra
cy

 is
 lo

w
.

If 
pa

re
nt

s 
us

e 
co

-s
le

ep
in

g 
as

 a
 m

ea
ns

 f
or

 s
et

tli
ng

 t
he

ir 
ch

ild
 b

ef
or

e 
sl

ee
p,

 w
or

k 
in

 
pa

rt
ne

rs
hi

p 
w

ith
 t

he
m

 t
o 

id
en

tif
y 

ot
he

r 
se

tt
lin

g 
st

ra
te

gi
es

 w
hi

ch
 e

na
bl

e 
th

em
 t

o 
re

tu
rn

 b
ab

y 
to

 h
is

/h
er

 o
w

n 
sl

ee
p 

su
rf

ac
e 

or
 c

on
ta

ct
 t

he
 P

ar
en

t 
H

el
pl

in
e 

to
 g

et
 

as
si

st
an

ce
 w

ith
 t

hi
s.

A
b

o
ri

g
in

al
 M

at
er

n
al

 In
fa

n
t 

C
ar

e 
W

o
rk

er
s 

pr
ov

id
e 

A
bo

rig
in

al
 W

om
en

 
w

ith
 c

on
tin

ui
ty

 o
f 

ca
re

 f
or

 a
nt

en
at

al
, 

bi
rt

hi
ng

 a
nd

 p
os

tn
at

al
 s

er
vi

ce
s.

 
Th

ey
 c

an
 b

e 
co

nt
ac

te
d 

th
ro

ug
h:

 
&gt;

W
om

en
 s 

an
d 

C
hi

ld
re

n 
s 

H
os

pi
ta

l 
Ph

: 8
16

1 
70

00
 

&gt;
Ly

el
l M

cE
w

in
 H

os
pi

ta
l  

  
Bi

rt
hi

ng
 a

nd
 A

ss
es

sm
en

t 
U

ni
t 

 
Ph

: 8
18

2 
93

26
 

&gt;
N

or
th

er
n 

A
re

a 
M

id
w

ife
ry

 G
ro

up
 

Pr
ac

tic
e 

Ph
: 8

25
2 

37
11

, a
nd

 
 

&gt;
N

un
ka

w
ar

rin
 Y

un
ti 

Ph
: 8

40
6 

16
00

A
u

st
ra

lia
n

 R
ef

u
g

ee
 A

ss
o

ci
at

io
n

 
pr

ov
id

e 
as

si
st

an
ce

 w
ith

 c
om

m
un

ity
 

an
d 

cu
ltu

ra
l o

rie
nt

at
io

n 
an

d 
em

er
ge

nc
y 

fin
an

ci
al

 a
nd

 m
at

er
ia

l 
as

si
st

an
ce

 P
h:

 8
35

4 
29

51

M
ig

ra
n

t 
R

es
o

u
rc

e 
C

en
tr

e 
 

pr
ov

id
e 

he
lp

 w
ith

 s
et

tle
m

en
t,

 f
am

ily
 

re
la

tio
ns

hi
p 

co
un

se
lin

g,
 fi

na
nc

ia
l 

su
pp

or
t 

an
d 

em
er

ge
nc

y 
re

lie
f,

 C
A

LD
 

fa
m

ily
 a

nd
 c

hi
ld

re
n 

s 
su

pp
or

t 
se

rv
ic

e 
Ph

: 8
21

7 
95

10

Tr
an

sl
at

in
g

 a
n

d
 In

te
rp

re
ti

n
g

 
Se

rv
ic

e 
pr

ov
id

e 
pr

of
es

si
on

al
 

tr
an

sl
at

in
g 

se
rv

ic
es

 2
4/

7 
 

Ph
: 1

31
 4

50
 

Standard 2 cont...



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 22

C
h

al
le

n
g

es
 in

 m
ee

ti
n

g
  

b
es

t-
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Ev
id

en
ce

 s
u

p
p

o
rt

in
g

 b
es

t 
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Su
p

p
o

rt
 a

n
d

 r
es

o
u

rc
es

Fa
m

ili
es

 m
ay

 s
it

e 
re

as
o

n
s 

fo
r 

co
-s

le
ep

in
g

 a
n

d
 n

o
t 

ro
o

m
-

sh
ar

in
g

. T
h

es
e 

m
ay

 in
cl

u
d

e:

In
fa

n
ts

 a
re

 m
o

re
 a

t 
ri

sk
 o

f 
SU

D
I a

n
d

 f
at

al
 s

le
ep

in
g

 a
cc

id
en

ts
 w

h
en

  
co

-s
le

ep
in

g
 o

cc
u

rs

 
&gt;

Pa
re

nt
s 

be
in

g 
co

nc
er

ne
d 

ab
ou

t 
no

t 
be

in
g 

ab
le

 t
o 

re
sp

on
d 

to
 

ba
by

 q
ui

ck
ly

 e
no

ug
h 

du
rin

g 
 

th
e 

ni
gh

t.

Re
se

ar
ch

 in
 N

ew
 Z

ea
la

nd
 a

nd
 t

he
 U

K
 h

as
 s

ho
w

n 
th

at
 s

le
ep

in
g 

ba
by

 in
 t

he
 s

am
e 

ro
om

, b
ut

 n
ot

 in
 t

he
 s

am
e 

be
d,

 w
ith

 t
he

 p
ar

en
ts

 f
or

 t
he

 fi
rs

t 
12

 m
on

th
s 

is
 p

ro
te

ct
iv

e.
 

Th
is

 is
 t

ho
ug

ht
 t

o 
be

 b
ec

au
se

 p
ar

en
ts

 c
an

 s
ee

 t
he

 b
ab

y 
an

d 
ea

si
ly

 c
he

ck
 t

o 
se

e 
th

at
 

ba
by

 is
 s

af
e.

 R
ec

en
t 

ev
id

en
ce

 f
ro

m
 t

he
 U

K
 in

di
ca

te
s 

th
at

 s
ha

rin
g 

th
e 

sa
m

e 
ro

om
 

du
rin

g 
ba

by
 s 

da
yt

im
e 

sl
ee

ps
 is

 a
ls

o 
pr

ot
ec

tiv
e.

25

Se
ve

ra
l s

tu
di

es
 h

av
e 

sh
ow

n 
th

at
 w

he
n 

a 
ca

re
gi

ve
r 

sl
ee

ps
 in

 t
he

 s
am

e 
ro

om
, b

ut
 n

ot
 

th
e 

sa
m

e 
be

d 
w

ith
 t

he
ir 

ba
by

, t
he

 c
ha

nc
e 

of
 t

he
 b

ab
y 

dy
in

g 
su

dd
en

ly
 a

nd
 u

ne
xp

ec
te

dl
y 

is
 r

ed
uc

ed
 b

y 
up

 t
o 

50
%

 w
he

n 
co

m
pa

re
d 

to
 b

ab
ie

s 
sl

ee
pi

ng
 in

 a
 s

ep
ar

at
e 

be
dr

oo
m

.

If 
ba

by
 is

 s
le

ep
in

g 
in

 a
 s

ep
ar

at
e 

ro
om

, p
ar

en
ts

 a
re

 n
ot

 e
xp

ec
te

d 
to

 o
bs

er
ve

 b
ab

y 
co

ns
ta

nt
ly

 b
ut

 t
he

y 
sh

ou
ld

 c
he

ck
 b

ab
y 

re
gu

la
rly

 t
o 

en
su

re
 t

ha
t 

th
e 

in
fa

nt
 r

em
ai

ns
  

on
 t

he
ir 

ba
ck

 a
nd

 t
he

 h
ea

d 
an

d 
fa

ce
 r

em
ai

n 
un

co
ve

re
d 

(a
s 

ba
by

 g
ro

w
s 

be
yo

nd
 5

 6
 

m
on

th
s 

th
ey

 w
ill

 m
ov

e 
ar

ou
nd

 t
he

 c
ot

 a
nd

 m
ay

 r
ol

l o
ve

r)
.

Ro
om

-s
ha

rin
g 

fa
ci

lit
at

es
 a

 r
ap

id
 r

es
po

ns
e 

to
 a

 b
ab

y 
s 

ne
ed

s,
 m

or
e 

co
nv

en
ie

nt
 s

et
tli

ng
 

an
d 

co
m

fo
rt

in
g 

of
 b

ab
ie

s,
 a

nd
 c

lo
se

r 
m

ot
he

r-
in

fa
nt

 c
on

ta
ct

 a
nd

 c
om

m
un

ic
at

io
n.

 

Ro
om

 s
ha

rin
g 

is
 r

ec
om

m
en

de
d 

fo
r 

al
l b

ab
ie

s 
al

th
ou

gh
 t

he
 r

oo
m

 w
he

re
 b

ab
y 

sl
ee

ps
 

m
us

t 
be

 k
ep

t 
sm

ok
e 

fr
ee

.

Se
e 

A
de

la
id

e 
N

ow
 a

rt
ic

le
 o

n 
C

or
on

er
 s 

Fi
nd

in
gs

 2
01

0 
 

w
w

w
.a

de
la

id
en

ow
.c

om
.a

u/
ne

w
s/

so
ut

h-
au

st
ra

lia
/p

ar
en

ts
-w

ar
ne

d-
on

-
co

t-
de

at
h-

da
ng

er
s-

of
-s

ha
rin

g-
be

ds
-

w
ith

-b
ab

ie
s/

st
or

y-
e6

fr
ea

83
-1

22
59

32
20

70
35

SI
D

S 
an

d 
K

id
s 

(2
00

8)
 In

fo
rm

at
io

n 
st

at
em

en
t:

 R
oo

m
-s

ha
rin

g.
 M

ay
, 

20
08

. C
an

be
rr

a 
 

w
w

w
.s

id
sa

nd
ki

ds
.o

rg

Standard 2 cont...



page 23 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

C
h

al
le

n
g

es
 in

 m
ee

ti
n

g
  

b
es

t-
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Ev
id

en
ce

 s
u

p
p

o
rt

in
g

 b
es

t 
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Su
p

p
o

rt
 a

n
d

 r
es

o
u

rc
es

St
af

f 
m

ay
 c

it
e 

m
an

y 
re

as
o

n
s 

fo
r 

n
o

t 
p

ro
vi

d
in

g
 in

fo
rm

at
io

n
 in

 
cu

lt
u

ra
lly

 a
cc

es
si

b
le

 a
n

d
 

ap
p

ro
p

ri
at

e 
w

ay
s 

in
cl

u
d

in
g

:

Fa
m

ili
es

 n
ee

d
 in

fo
rm

at
io

n
 t

o
 b

e 
p

ro
vi

d
ed

 in
 w

ay
s 

th
at

 a
ss

is
t 

th
em

 t
o

 m
ak

e 
d

ec
is

io
n

s 
an

d
 e

xe
rc

is
e 

g
re

at
er

 c
o

n
tr

o
l o

ve
r 

th
ei

r 
h

ea
lt

h

 
&gt;

A
ss

um
pt

io
ns

 o
f 

fa
m

ily
  

lit
er

ac
y 

le
ve

ls
.

 
&gt;

O
ve

r 
re

lia
nc

e 
on

 w
rit

te
n 

he
al

th
 

in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

an
d 

re
so

ur
ce

s.

M
uc

h 
of

 t
he

 in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

pr
ov

id
ed

 t
o 

fa
m

ili
es

 a
ss

um
es

 m
or

e 
th

an
 a

 b
as

ic
 le

ve
l o

f 
he

al
th

 li
te

ra
cy

. P
rio

r 
to

 t
he

 b
irt

h 
an

d 
af

te
r 

th
e 

bi
rt

h 
of

 a
 b

ab
y,

 f
am

ili
es

 a
re

 e
xp

os
ed

 
to

 a
n 

en
or

m
ou

s 
am

ou
nt

 o
f 

in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

fr
om

 a
 v

ar
ie

ty
 o

f 
so

ur
ce

s 
in

cl
ud

in
g 

m
ed

ia
, 

m
ar

ke
tin

g,
  b

ou
nt

y 
ba

gs
 , 

nu
rs

es
, d

oc
to

rs
 a

nd
 f

am
ily

 m
em

be
rs

. 

U
np

ub
lis

he
d 

m
ar

ke
t 

re
se

ar
ch

 c
on

du
ct

ed
 in

 A
de

la
id

e,
 S

ou
th

 A
us

tr
al

ia
 in

 2
00

9,
 f

ou
nd

 
pa

re
nt

s 
an

d 
ca

re
gi

ve
rs

 m
or

e 
lik

el
y 

to
 a

ct
 o

n 
an

d 
un

de
rs

ta
nd

 in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

ab
ou

t 
sa

fe
 

sl
ee

pi
ng

 w
he

n 
th

is
 in

fo
rm

at
io

n 
is

 p
ro

vi
de

d 
ve

rb
al

ly
 f

ro
m

 a
 h

ea
lth

 p
ro

fe
ss

io
na

l. 

Pa
re

nt
s 

st
re

ss
ed

 t
he

 im
po

rt
an

ce
 o

f 
th

e 
re

la
tio

ns
hi

p 
w

ith
 n

ur
se

s 
an

d 
he

al
th

 p
ro

fe
ss

io
na

ls
 

as
 o

nc
e 

at
 h

om
e 

w
ith

 b
ab

y 
th

ey
 a

re
 o

ft
en

 t
im

e 
po

or
, t

ire
d 

an
d 

st
re

ss
ed

. S
om

e 
pa

re
nt

s 
al

so
 r

ep
or

te
d 

th
ey

 r
el

ie
d 

ve
ry

 li
tt

le
 o

n 
bo

ok
s,

 p
am

ph
le

ts
 a

nd
 o

th
er

 w
rit

te
n 

in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

pr
ef

er
rin

g 
to

 a
ct

 o
n 

ex
pe

rie
nc

e.

It 
is

 e
ss

en
tia

l t
ha

t 
st

af
f 

w
or

k 
in

 p
ar

tn
er

sh
ip

 w
ith

 f
am

ili
es

 a
nd

 p
ro

vi
de

 in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

in
 

w
ay

s 
th

at
 a

ss
is

t 
fa

m
ili

es
 a

nd
 c

ar
eg

iv
er

s 
to

 u
nd

er
st

an
d 

an
d 

im
pl

em
en

t 
sa

fe
 in

fa
nt

 
ca

re
 p

ra
ct

ic
es

 a
nd

 t
ha

t 
th

ey
 e

nc
ou

ra
ge

 f
am

ili
es

 t
o 

as
k 

qu
es

tio
ns

 a
nd

 c
rit

ic
al

ly
 c

on
si

de
r 

th
e 

in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

av
ai

la
bl

e 
to

 t
he

m
. T

he
 p

ro
vi

si
on

 o
f 

th
is

 e
ss

en
tia

l i
nf

or
m

at
io

n 
to

 
pa

re
nt

s 
sh

ou
ld

 b
e 

do
cu

m
en

te
d 

in
 c

lie
nt

 r
ec

or
ds

 f
or

 b
ot

h 
m

ot
he

r 
an

d 
ba

by
. 

SI
D

S 
an

d
 K

id
s 

pr
ov

id
e 

re
so

ur
ce

s 
in

 
a 

nu
m

be
r 

of
 la

ng
ua

ge
s 

  
 

w
w

w
.s

id
sa

nd
ki

ds
.o

rg
/s

af
e_

sl
ee

pi
ng

.h
tm

l

C
en

tr
e 

fo
r 

H
ea

lt
h

 P
ro

m
o

ti
o

n
 

of
fe

r 
Q

ua
lit

y 
G

ui
de

lin
es

 f
or

 H
ea

lth
 

In
fo

rm
at

io
n 

av
ai

la
bl

e 
on

 th
ei

r w
eb

sit
e 

w
w

w
.h

ea
lth

pr
om

ot
io

n.
cy

w
hs

.s
a.

go
v.

au

A
 s

um
m

ar
y 

of
 t

he
 S

af
e 

Sl
ee

pi
ng

 
Pr

og
ra

m
 M

ar
ke

t 
Re

se
ar

ch
  

 D
ra

ft
 

Re
po

rt
 is

 a
va

ila
bl

e 
fr

om
 t

he
 C

en
tr

e 
fo

r H
ea

lth
 P

ro
m

ot
io

n,
 S

ou
th

 A
us

tr
al

ia
.

Standard 3: All staff will consider the social and life circumstances of each family 
when promoting safe sleeping practices and ensure the information is provided in 
ways that are culturally accessible and can be easily understood by that family.



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 24

C
h

al
le

n
g

es
 in

 m
ee

ti
n

g
  

b
es

t-
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Ev
id

en
ce

 s
u

p
p

o
rt

in
g

 b
es

t 
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Su
p

p
o

rt
 a

n
d

 r
es

o
u

rc
es

St
af

f 
m

ay
 c

it
e 

m
an

y 
re

as
o

n
s 

 
fo

r 
n

o
t 

p
ro

vi
d

in
g

 in
fo

rm
at

io
n

 
in

 c
u

lt
u

ra
lly

 a
cc

es
si

b
le

 a
n

d
 

ap
p

ro
p

ri
at

e 
w

ay
s 

in
cl

u
d

in
g

:

Fa
m

ili
es

 n
ee

d
 in

fo
rm

at
io

n
 t

o
 b

e 
p

ro
vi

d
ed

 in
 w

ay
s 

th
at

 a
ss

is
t 

th
em

 t
o

 m
ak

e 
d

ec
is

io
n

s 
an

d
 e

xe
rc

is
e 

g
re

at
er

 c
o

n
tr

o
l o

ve
r 

th
ei

r 
h

ea
lt

h

 
&gt;

Ti
m

e 
ta

ke
n 

to
 c

om
m

un
ic

at
e 

ef
fe

ct
iv

el
y.

 

 
&gt;

La
ck

 o
f 

kn
ow

le
dg

e 
ab

ou
t 

w
he

re
 

to
 a

cc
es

s 
cu

ltu
ra

lly
 a

pp
ro

pr
ia

te
 

in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

an
d 

su
pp

or
t.

 
&gt;

D
iffi

cu
lti

es
 e

ng
ag

in
g 

w
ith

 c
lie

nt
 

re
la

tiv
es

 a
nd

 k
in

.

Th
e 

tim
e 

ta
ke

n 
to

 c
om

m
un

ic
at

e 
sa

fe
 s

le
ep

in
g 

m
es

sa
ge

s 
to

 f
am

ili
es

 c
an

 s
ig

ni
fic

an
tly

 
im

pr
ov

e 
pa

re
nt

s 
 c

ap
ac

ity
 t

o 
pr

ov
id

e 
a 

sa
fe

 s
le

ep
in

g 
en

vi
ro

nm
en

t 
fo

r 
th

ei
r 

in
fa

nt
 

an
d 

re
du

ce
 u

nn
ec

es
sa

ry
 r

is
ks

. F
ai

lu
re

 t
o 

co
m

m
un

ic
at

e 
or

 t
he

 p
ro

vi
si

on
 o

f 
in

co
ns

is
te

nt
, 

w
ro

ng
 o

r 
m

is
le

ad
in

g 
in

fo
rm

at
io

n,
 s

ig
ni

fic
an

tly
 im

pa
irs

 p
ar

en
ta

l c
ap

ac
ity

 t
o 

pr
ob

le
m

 
so

lv
e 

an
d 

m
ak

e 
cr

iti
ca

l d
ec

isi
on

s 
ar

ou
nd

 a
ch

ie
vi

ng
 re

co
m

m
en

de
d 

sa
fe

 s
le

ep
in

g 
pr

ac
tic

es
.

W
he

re
ve

r 
po

ss
ib

le
 in

fo
rm

at
io

n 
sh

ou
ld

 b
e 

pr
ov

id
ed

 in
 t

he
 m

os
t 

ap
pr

op
ria

te
 la

ng
ua

ge
 

an
d 

fo
rm

at
. A

pp
ro

xi
m

at
el

y 
2.

7 
m

ill
io

n 
A

us
tr

al
ia

ns
 (1

8%
) h

av
e 

di
ffi

cu
lty

 u
nd

er
st

an
di

ng
 

an
d 

us
in

g 
in

fo
rm

at
io

n 
re

la
tin

g 
to

 h
ea

lth
 is

su
es

.3
5  

M
er

el
y 

tr
an

sl
at

in
g 

w
rit

te
n 

he
al

th
 

in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

m
ay

 e
xc

lu
de

 t
ho

se
 w

ho
 a

re
 il

lit
er

at
e 

or
 h

av
e 

ex
ce

pt
io

na
lly

 lo
w

 li
te

ra
cy

 

le
ve

ls
, r

eg
ar

dl
es

s 
of

 t
he

 la
ng

ua
ge

 u
se

d.
36

D
es

pi
te

 t
he

 d
iffi

cu
lti

es
 t

ha
t 

co
m

m
un

ic
at

io
n 

ex
ch

an
ge

s 
m

ig
ht

 p
re

se
nt

, i
t 

is
 v

er
y 

im
po

rt
an

t 
th

at
 s

ta
ff

 c
al

l o
n 

pe
op

le
 w

ho
 h

av
e 

cr
ed

ib
ili

ty
 w

ith
 t

he
 f

am
ily

 o
r 

ar
e 

ab
le

 
to

 e
ff

ec
tiv

el
y 

co
nv

ey
 t

he
 m

es
sa

ge
s 

an
d 

th
ei

r 
im

po
rt

an
ce

. T
hi

s 
m

ay
 in

vo
lv

e 
se

ek
in

g 
pe

op
le

 o
ut

 w
ho

 a
re

 a
bl

e 
to

 h
el

p 
tr

an
sl

at
e 

th
e 

in
fo

rm
at

io
n 

in
to

 t
he

 la
ng

ua
ge

 o
r 

in
  

a 
m

an
ne

r 
th

at
 is

 s
ui

ta
bl

e 
an

d 
ha

s 
m

ea
ni

ng
 f

or
 t

he
 f

am
ily

. 

By
 d

oi
ng

 t
hi

s 
st

af
f 

ca
n 

en
su

re
:

 
&gt;

kn
ow

le
dg

e 
an

d 
un

de
rs

ta
nd

in
g 

of
 s

af
e 

sl
ee

pi
ng

 m
es

sa
ge

s 
by

 f
am

ili
es

 is
 im

pr
ov

ed
,

 
&gt;

fa
m

ili
es

 h
av

e 
gr

ea
te

r 
co

m
m

itm
en

t 
an

d 
co

nfi
de

nc
e 

to
 p

ro
bl

em
 s

ol
ve

 a
nd

 o
ve

rc
om

e 
th

e 
ba

rr
ie

rs
 t

o 
im

pl
em

en
tin

g 
th

e 
sa

fe
 in

fa
nt

 c
ar

e 
pr

ac
tic

es
 a

t 
ho

m
e,

 a
nd

 

 
&gt;

th
ey

 h
av

e 
a 

gr
ea

te
r 

aw
ar

en
es

s 
of

 f
am

ili
es

  n
ee

ds
 a

nd
 p

re
fe

re
nc

es
. 

M
an

y 
ag

en
ci

es
 n

ow
 h

av
e 

C
ul

tu
ra

lly
 a

nd
 L

in
gu

is
tic

al
ly

 D
iv

er
se

 (C
A

LD
) w

or
ke

rs
 a

nd
 

A
bo

rig
in

al
 H

ea
lth

 o
r 

Li
ai

so
n 

w
or

ke
rs

. S
ta

ff
 s

ho
ul

d 
fa

m
ili

ar
is

e 
th

em
se

lv
es

 w
ith

 t
he

se
 

su
pp

or
ts

 a
nd

 c
al

l o
n 

th
em

 a
s 

ne
ed

ed
. 

A
b

o
ri

g
in

al
 M

at
er

n
al

 In
fa

n
t 

 
C

ar
e 

W
o

rk
er

s 
pr

ov
id

e 
A

bo
rig

in
al

 
W

om
en

 w
ith

 c
on

tin
ui

ty
 o

f 
ca

re
 f

or
 

an
te

na
ta

l, 
bi

rt
hi

ng
 a

nd
 p

os
tn

at
al

 
se

rv
ic

es
. T

he
y 

ca
n 

be
 c

on
ta

ct
ed

 
th

ro
ug

h:

 
&gt;

W
om

en
 s 

an
d 

C
hi

ld
re

n 
s 

H
os

pi
ta

l 
Ph

: 8
16

1 
70

00
 

&gt;
Ly

el
l M

cE
w

in
 H

os
pi

ta
l  

  
Bi

rt
hi

ng
 a

nd
 A

ss
es

sm
en

t 
U

ni
t 

 
Ph

: 8
18

2 
93

26
 

&gt;
N

or
th

er
n 

A
re

a 
M

id
w

ife
ry

 G
ro

up
 

Pr
ac

tic
e 

Ph
: 8

25
2 

37
11

, a
nd

 
&gt;

N
un

ka
w

ar
rin

 Y
un

ti 
Ph

: 8
40

6 
16

00
A

u
st

ra
lia

n
 R

ef
u

g
ee

 A
ss

o
ci

at
io

n
 

pr
ov

id
e 

as
si

st
an

ce
 w

ith
 c

om
m

un
ity

 
an

d 
cu

ltu
ra

l o
rie

nt
at

io
n 

an
d 

em
er

ge
nc

y 
fin

an
ci

al
 a

nd
 m

at
er

ia
l 

as
si

st
an

ce
 P

h:
 8

35
4 

29
51

M
ig

ra
n

t 
R

es
o

u
rc

e 
C

en
tr

e 
 

pr
ov

id
e 

he
lp

 w
ith

 s
et

tle
m

en
t,

 f
am

ily
 

re
la

tio
ns

hi
p 

co
un

se
lli

ng
, fi

na
nc

ia
l 

su
pp

or
t 

an
d 

em
er

ge
nc

y 
re

lie
f,

 C
A

LD
 

fa
m

ily
 a

nd
 c

hi
ld

re
n 

s 
su

pp
or

t 
se

rv
ic

e 
Ph

: 8
21

7 
95

10

Tr
an

sl
at

in
g

 a
n

d
 In

te
rp

re
ti

n
g

 
Se

rv
ic

e 
pr

ov
id

e 
pr

of
es

si
on

al
 

tr
an

sl
at

in
g 

se
rv

ic
es

 2
4/

7 
Ph

: 1
31

 4
50

 

Standard 3 cont...



page 25 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

C
h

al
le

n
g

es
 in

 m
ee

ti
n

g
  

b
es

t-
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Ev
id

en
ce

 s
u

p
p

o
rt

in
g

 b
es

t 
p

ra
ct

ic
e

Su
p

p
o

rt
 a

n
d

 r
es

o
u

rc
es

Ex
p

ec
ta

n
t 

an
d

 n
ew

 p
ar

en
ts

 
m

ay
 n

o
t 

d
is

cl
o

se
 t

h
ei

r 
sm

o
ki

n
g

 
st

at
u

s 
fo

r 
a 

n
u

m
b

er
 o

f 
re

as
o

n
s

In
fa

n
ts

 o
f 

m
o

th
er

s 
w

h
o

 s
m

o
ke

 o
r 

w
h

o
 a

re
 e

xp
o

se
d

 t
o

 s
ec

o
n

d
 h

an
d

 s
m

o
ke

 
ar

e 
m

o
re

 li
ke

ly
 t

o
 b

e 
st

ill
b

o
rn

, b
o

rn
 p

re
m

at
u

re
ly

 a
n

d
 o

f 
lo

w
 b

ir
th

 w
ei

g
h

t 
an

d
 s

u
ff

er
 p

er
in

at
al

 d
ea

th
.

 
&gt;

Fa
m

ili
es

 a
nd

 c
ar

eg
iv

er
s 

m
ay

 
un

de
re

st
im

at
e 

th
e 

ef
fe

ct
s 

of
 

sm
ok

in
g 

on
 in

fa
nt

s 
an

d 
ch

ild
re

n.

 
&gt;

Fa
m

ili
es

 a
nd

 c
ar

eg
iv

er
s 

ar
e 

un
de

r-
 in

fo
rm

ed
 a

bo
ut

 t
he

 r
is

ks
 

be
tw

ee
n 

sm
ok

in
g,

 in
fa

nt
s 

an
d 

fa
ta

l s
le

ep
in

g 
in

ci
de

nt
s.

In
fa

nt
s 

an
d 

ch
ild

re
n 

ar
e 

at
 a

 h
ig

he
r 

ris
k 

of
 h

ar
m

 f
ro

m
 p

as
si

ve
 s

m
ok

in
g 

th
an

 a
du

lts
 

be
ca

us
e 

of
 t

he
ir 

sm
al

le
r, 

de
ve

lo
pi

ng
 b

od
ie

s,
 h

ig
he

r 
br

ea
th

in
g 

ra
te

s 
an

d 
le

ss
 d

ev
el

op
ed

 
re

sp
ira

to
ry

 a
nd

 im
m

un
e 

sy
st

em
s.

In
fa

nt
s 

of
 m

ot
he

rs
 w

ho
 s

m
ok

e 
or

 w
ho

 a
re

 e
xp

os
ed

 t
o 

se
co

nd
 h

an
d 

sm
ok

e 
ar

e 
m

or
e 

lik
el

y 
to

 b
e 

st
ill

bo
rn

, b
or

n 
pr

em
at

ur
el

y 
an

d 
of

 lo
w

 b
irt

h 
w

ei
gh

t 
an

d 
su

ff
er

 p
er

in
at

al
 

de
at

h.
 S

pe
ci

fic
 e

ff
ec

ts
 o

f 
pa

ss
iv

e 
sm

ok
in

g 
on

 in
fa

nt
s 

an
d 

ch
ild

re
n 

in
cl

ud
e 

SI
D

S;
 

re
sp

ira
to

ry
 in

fe
ct

io
ns

 a
nd

 c
on

di
tio

ns
 in

cl
ud

in
g 

cr
ou

p,
 b

ro
nc

hi
tis

, a
nd

 p
ne

um
on

ia
; 

ea
r 

in
fe

ct
io

ns
; l

ea
rn

in
g 

di
ffi

cu
lti

es
; b

eh
av

io
ur

al
 p

ro
bl

em
s;

 a
nd

 in
cr

ea
se

d 
lik

el
ih

oo
d 

of
 c

hi
ld

ho
od

 a
st

hm
a.

37
-4

0  

Th
er

e 
is

 n
o 

sa
fe

 le
ve

l o
f 

pa
ss

iv
e 

sm
ok

e 
ex

po
su

re
, a

nd
 e

ve
n 

br
ie

f 
ex

po
su

re
s 

ca
n 

be
 

ha
rm

fu
l. 

Th
e 

el
im

in
at

io
n 

of
 s

m
ok

in
g 

in
 in

do
or

 s
pa

ce
s 

is
 t

he
 o

nl
y 

w
ay

 t
o 

fu
lly

 p
ro

te
ct

 
ch

ild
re

n 
fr

om
 e

xp
os

ur
e 

to
 s

ec
on

d 
ha

nd
 s

m
ok

e.
 P

rim
ar

y 
so

ur
ce

s 
of

 in
fa

nt
s 

 a
nd

 
ch

ild
re

n 
s 

pa
ss

iv
e 

sm
ok

e 
ex

po
su

re
 a

re
 t

he
 h

om
e 

an
d 

ve
hi

cl
e.

 A
 s

in
gl

e 
ci

ga
re

tt
e 

sm
ok

ed
 in

 a
 r

oo
m

 w
ith

 p
oo

r 
ve

nt
ila

tio
n 

ge
ne

ra
te

s 
m

uc
h 

hi
gh

er
 c

on
ce

nt
ra

tio
ns

 o
f 

to
xi

c 
su

bs
ta

nc
es

 in
 t

he
 a

ir 
th

an
 n

or
m

al
, e

ve
ry

da
y 

ac
tiv

iti
es

 in
 a

 c
ity

, w
hi

le
 n

ic
ot

in
e 

fr
om

 s
ec

on
d 

ha
nd

 s
m

ok
e 

is 
de

po
sit

ed
 o

n 
ho

us
eh

ol
d 

su
rf

ac
es

 a
nd

 in
 d

us
t. 

En
vi

ro
nm

en
ta

l 
to

ba
cc

o 
sm

ok
e 

pe
rm

ea
te

s 
th

e 
en

tir
e 

ho
us

e 
an

d 
lin

ge
rs

 lo
ng

 a
ft

er
 t

he
 c

ig
ar

et
te

 h
as

 
be

en
 e

xt
in

gu
is

he
d,

 s
o 

sm
ok

in
g 

in
 c

er
ta

in
 r

oo
m

s,
 a

t 
ce

rt
ai

n 
tim

es
, o

r 
by

 a
 w

in
do

w
, 

fa
n 

or
 d

oo
r 

is
 n

ot
 s

af
e.

37

Sm
ok

in
g 

an
d 

Pr
eg

na
nc

y 
bo

ok
le

t 
av

ai
la

bl
e 

fr
om

 Q
u

it
 S

A
  

  
w

w
w

.q
ui

ts
a.

or
g.

au
/a

sp
x/

or
de

r_
on

lin
e.

as
px

Pr
eg

na
nt

 a
nd

 S
m

ok
in

g 
(A

bo
rig

in
al

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&gt;

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Standard 4: All staff will ensure that expectant and new parents are made aware 
of the strong association between smoking and the increased risk of SIDS and 
supported and referred to smoking cessation or reduction programs.



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 26

C
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ct
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kn
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A
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(A
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21
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th

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s 

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Standard 5: All staff will provide families and caregivers with accurate information 
about a safe cot, with a safe mattress, safe bedding and in a safe environment.





Services and 
information

Quick guide for help

Quick guide for information

References

S
e

rvice
s a

n
d

 in
fo

rm
a

tio
n





Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 27

Quick guide for help
This list is intended as a guide only and does not in any way intend to be an exhaustive list of all available 
services in South Australia. 

Challenges to  
Safe Practice

Services Details Contact

Sleep positioning 

Placing baby on back  
to sleep may raise: 

 &gt; concerns about infants 
aspirating after feeding 
and regurgitating,

 &gt; belief that baby sleeps 
and settles better on 
the front or side,

 &gt; difficulty settling and 
putting infants down  
to sleep,

 &gt; concerns about  
miss-shapen head 
(plagiocephaly).

Child and Family  
Health nurses

Child and Family Health 
Nurses can provide support 
and advice to parents. 

CaFHs appointment line 
Ph: 1300 733 606

Kidsafe SA Kidsafe SA provide advice on 
sleeping bags and the risks 
and safety aspects of aids and 
devices for infants.

Kidsafe SA 
Ph: 8161 6318  
www.Kidsafesa.com.au

SIDS and Kids SA Provide counselling and 
advice on the reasons for 
sleeping baby on back.

SIDS and Kids SA 
Ph: 8369 0155 
www.sidsandkids.org

SA Parent Helpline Advice on settling babies  
is available from the Parent 
Helpline 24/7.

SA Parent Helpline 
Ph:1300 364 100 
www.parenting.sa.gov.au/
helpline/

Health Direct 
Helpline

24 hour call centre for non 
urgent health advice.

Health Direct Helpline 
Ph: 1800 022 222

Cot bedding 

Removing many forms 
of bedding and toys 
from the cot may raise:

 &gt; concerns baby will get 
cold without a doona, 
hat, duvet etc, 

 &gt; belief that baby sleeps 
better with toys, pillow  
or sheep skin in the cot,

 &gt; no funds to purchase 
baby sleeping bag.

Child and Family  
Health nurses

CaFHs nurses can demonstrate 
wrapping techniques and 
advise on appropriate infant 
bedding and settling techniques.

CaFHs appointment line 
Ph: 1300 733 606

SA Parent Helpline  
and Kidsafe SA

Can provide advice on setting 
up a safe sleep environment 
for babies 24/7.

Parent Helpline 
Ph:1300 364 100 
www.parenting.sa.gov.au/
helpline/

Kidsafe SA 
Ph: 8161 6318

SIDS and Kids SA Provide counselling and 
advice about the sleep 
environment for babies.

SIDS and Kids SA 
Ph: 8369 0155 
www.sidsandkids.org

Health Direct 
Helpline

24 hour call centre for non 
urgent health advice.

Health Direct Helpline 
Ph: 1800 022 222

Smoking at home 

Families and caregivers:

 &gt; underestimate the 
effects of smoking  
on infants,

 &gt; are unaware of the 
association between 
smoking and fatal 
sleeping incidents,

 &gt; are unaware of the 
opportunities pregnancy 
presents to quit smoking.

Quit SA Provides state-wide programs 
to help smokers quit smoking.

Quit SA 
Ph:137 848



page 28 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

Challenges to  
Safe Practice

Services Details Contact

Room sharing 

Sleeping baby in their  
own cot located next to 
the parent s bed or in 
the same room as the 
parents could present 
difficulties if there is: 

 &gt; no access to a cot,

 &gt; no funds for a cot,

 &gt; no room for a cot in 
the parent s bedroom,

 &gt; cultural practices 
which support other 
than safe practice,

 &gt; no stable housing,

 &gt; many children sharing 
the same bed.

Aboriginal 
Maternal Infant 
Care Workers

Aboriginal Maternal Infant 
Care Workers provide 
Aboriginal Women and their 
families with continuity of 
care for antenatal, birthing 
and postnatal services.

AMIC workers can be 
contacted through:

 &gt; Women s and 
Children s Hospital  
Ph: 8161 7000

 &gt; Lyell McEwin Hospital 
  Birthing and 
Assessment Unit,  
Ph: 8182 9326

 &gt; Northern Area Midwifery 
Group Practice  
Ph: 8252 3711

 &gt; Nunkawarrin Yunti  
Ph: 8406 1600

Department for 
Families and 
Communities (DFC)

Can provide information  
and access to financial 
services, housing services  
and family support.

The DFC website has 
location and contact 
details of services 
provided http://www.
dfc.sa.gov.au/pub/

Centacare

Lutheran 
Community Care

Anglicare

Uniting Care Wesley

These 4 agencies can provide 
emergency financial assistance 
and housing support in certain 
circumstances and some provide 
services in country areas.

Their websites have 
location and contact 
details of services 
available:  
www.centacare.org.au

Lutheran Care  
Ph: 8269933

ww.anglicare-sa.org.au

Uniting Care Wesley: 
www.ucwpa.org.au/

Nunkawarrin Yunti 
of SA

Provide access to 
paediatrician services  
for Aboriginal families.

Nunkawarrin Yunti 
Ph: 8406 1600

Translating and  
Interpreting Service 
(TIS)

Provide professional 
translating services 24/7.

Translating and  
Interpreting Service (TIS) 
Ph: 131 450 and quote 
your service s client #

Migrant Health 
Service

The MHS provides culturally 
appropriate medical care for 
migrants, refugees and assylum 
seekers. Training, advice and 
information is also provided 
to individuals and groups.

Migrant Health Service 
Ph: 8237 3900

Migrant Resource 
Centre (MRC)

Can provide help with 
settlement, financial  
support and emergency  
relief, CALD family and 
children s support service.

Migrant Resource Centre 
(MRC) 
Ph: 8217 9510



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 29

Challenges to  
Safe Practice

Services Details Contact

Difficult social and  
life circumstances

Difficulty implementing 
safe infant care practices 
due to:

 &gt; poor emotional health 
and wellbeing, anxiety, 
depression,

 &gt; recent migration,

 &gt; cultural and linguistic 
diversity,

 &gt; limited mental capacity,

 &gt; drug/alcohol use,

 &gt; violence,

 &gt; young parents.

Nunkawarrin Yunti 
of SA

Have access to psychologist 
and psychiatric services for 
Aboriginal families.

Nunkawarrin Yunti 
Ph: 8406 1600

Alcohol and Drug 
Information Service 
helpline

Provide confidential alcohol 
and drug counselling 24/7. If 
an interpreter is needed, ring 
the Translating and Interpreting 
Service on 13 1450 and ask 
to be connected to the  
SA Alcohol and Drug 
Information Service.

Alcohol and Drug 
Information Service 
helpline  
Ph: 1300 13 1340  
South Australian callers 
  local call fee

Or phone TIS on 131450 
for an interpreter

Beyond Blue  
Info Line

Provides access to 
information and referral  
to relevant services for 
depression and anxiety.

Beyond Blue Info Line 
Ph: 1300 22 4636 

Department for 
Families and 
Communities (DFC)

Can provide access to 
financial services, housing 
services and family support. 

Families SA has a specific role 
to protect children. Any 
concerns about the safety 
and well being of infants and 
children can be made to the 
Child Abuse Report Line 
which operates 24/7.

The DFC website has 
location and contact 
details of services provided  
www.dfc.sa.gov.au/pub/

The Child Abuse Report Line 
Ph 131 478 is a part of 
Families SA.

Louise Place 
(Centacare)

Louise Place is a  24hour 
supported accomm. service for 
young women who are 
pregnant or parenting and who 
are homeless or at risk of 
homelessness, during their 
pregnancy and in the early 
months of parenting.  They also 
provide an outreach service.

Louise Place can be 
contacted directly on  
Ph: 8272 6811

Migrant Health 
Service

The MHS provides culturally 
appropriate medical care for 
migrants, refugees and assylum 
seekers. Training, advice and 
information is also provided 
to individuals and groups.

Migrant Health Service 
Ph: 8237 3900

Migrant Resource 
Centre (MRC)

Provide help with settlement, 
family relationship counselling, 
financial support and emergency 
relief, CALD family and 
children s support service.

Migrant Resource Centre 
(MRC) 
Ph: 8217 9510

Continued on page 30...



page 30 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

Challenges to  
Safe Practice

Services Details Contact

Continued from page 29...
Difficult social and  
life circumstances

Difficulty implementing 
safe infant care 
practices due to:

 &gt; poor emotional health 
and wellbeing, anxiety, 
depression,

 &gt; recent migration,

 &gt; cultural and linguistic 
diversity,

 &gt; limited mental capacity,

 &gt; drug/alcohol use,

 &gt; violence,

 &gt; young parents.

Translating and  
Interpreting Service 
(TIS)

Provide professional 
translating services 24/7.

Translating and  
Interpreting Service (TIS) 
Ph: 131 450 and quote 
your service s client number

Men s Line Provides a dedicated service for 
men with relationship and 
family concerns 24/7.

Men s Line 
Ph: 1300 789978  
www.menslineaus.org.au/

Domestic Violence 
Crisis Service 1300 
782 200 
Mon Fri 9am 4pm

Police 131 444

Central Eastern 
Domestic Violence 
Service (CALD workers 
may be available) 
Ph: 8365 5033

These are just a starting place 
to contact Aboriginal workers 
located in the Northern and 
Southern regions of SA 
providing advice and 
assistance responding to 
domestic violence.

 &gt; Northern: Muna 
Paiendi Ph:8182 9206

 &gt; Southern: ATSI Primary 
Health Care Team  
Ph: 8384 9266

 &gt; Aboriginal Family Clinic 
Ph: 8179 5943

 &gt; Flinders Medical Centre: 
Karpa Ngarrattendi 
Ph: 8204 5012



Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards page 31

Quick guide for information
The Child and Family Health Service website www.cyh.com provides a comprehensive range of up-to-date 
evidence-based information about safe sleeping for babies. Another useful source of information is the 
SIDS and Kids website www.sidsandkids.org. Listed below are further information sources available to 
families seeking evidence-based information about safe infant sleeping environments and care practices.

Safe infant care Information service Details Contact

Sleep and settling Parenting SA Parent Easy Guides  
 Sleep (Children 0 6 years) 

www.parenting.sa.gov.
au/pegs/PEG34.pdf

Head shape 
(plagiocephaly)

Child and Family Health  Plagiocephaly  

 Baby s Head Shape 

www.cyh.com

www.sidsandkids.org

Wrapping Infants SIDS and Kids SA  Wrapping Infants   
Info Sheet

www.sidsandkids.org

Tummy time SIDS and Kids SA  Tummy time  brochures SIDS and Kids    
Ph: 8369 0155

www.sidsandkids.org

Centre for Health 
Promotion

Eat well be active  
  Healthy eating and 
active play for under 5 s 
DVD  
tips on tummy play time 
for infants

Centre for Health 
Promotion  
Ph: 8161 7777 to order  
a free copy

www.healthpromotion.
cywhs.sa.gov.au

Post natal  
depression/anxiety

Beyond Blue Provide information 
about mental health, 
anxiety and depression 
on their website

Ph: 1300 22 4636

www.beyondblue.org.au

www.cyh.com

Culturally and 
linguistically diverse 
written information

Sids and Kids SIDS and Kids provide 
information sheets in  
other languages

www.sidsandkids.org

Product Safety, cots  
and and the dangers  
of positioning cots  
near blind cords and 
other hazards

Australian Standards Australian Standard  
for Household Cots  
(AS/NZS 2172)

Tips to keep your  
baby safe

Kidsafe Australia 

www.kidsafe.com.au

Australian Competition 
and Consumer 
Commission

For information about 
competition, fair trade  
and consumer protection 
laws and benefits for 
consumers, business 
and the community

www.productsafety.gov.au

www.accc.gov.au/



page 32 Best Practice Indicators for Health, Families SA and Childcare Staff  |  South Australian Safe Infant Sleeping Standards

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For more information 

Centre for Health Promotion, 
Children, Youth and Women's Health Service 
Phone: (08) 8161 7777 
295 South Terrace, Adelaide SA 5000 
cywhshealthpromotion@health.sa.gov.au

Non-English speaking: for information in languages other than 
English, call the Interpreting and Translating Centre and ask them 
to call The Department of Health. This service is available at no  
cost to you, contact (08) 8226 1990.

  Department of Health, Government of South Australia.  
All rights reserved. ISBN: 97809806980-9-1. Printed March 2011.


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