<html>
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8"/>
<meta name="tikaGenerated" content="true"/>
<meta name="date" content="2018-09-04T08:01:32Z"/>
<meta name="xmp:CreatorTool" content="Adobe InDesign CS6 (Macintosh)"/>
<meta name="trapped" content="False"/>
<meta name="meta:creation-date" content="2018-09-04T07:53:15Z"/>
<meta name="created" content="Tue Sep 04 17:23:15 ACST 2018"/>
<meta name="xmpTPg:NPages" content="40"/>
<meta name="Creation-Date" content="2018-09-04T07:53:15Z"/>
<meta name="dcterms:created" content="2018-09-04T07:53:15Z"/>
<meta name="Last-Modified" content="2018-09-04T08:01:32Z"/>
<meta name="dcterms:modified" content="2018-09-04T08:01:32Z"/>
<meta name="Last-Save-Date" content="2018-09-04T08:01:32Z"/>
<meta name="meta:save-date" content="2018-09-04T08:01:32Z"/>
<meta name="producer" content="Adobe PDF Library 10.0.1"/>
<meta name="modified" content="2018-09-04T08:01:32Z"/>
<meta name="Content-Type" content="application/pdf"/>
</head>
<body>
<pre>
SA Dental Service
Year Book  15-16





SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 1

Contents

2 Executive Director Report

3 Strategic Directions 

4 Vision

4 Values

5 Organisational Chart

6 Statewide Dental Services Division

7 The Adelaide Dental Hospital Division

7 Health Promotion Division

8 Service Quality and Performance 
 Improvement Division (SQ&amp;PI) 

9 Corporate Services Division

10 Report on the Implementation of the 
 SA Dental Service Strategic Plan 

 Other Matters

22 Freedom of information
 
24 Adelaide Dental Hospital Statistics 

26 School Dental Service Statistics
 
29 Community Dental Service Statistics
 
32 Aboriginal Dental Scheme Statistics
 
33 Human Resource Statistics
 

36 Financial Statements



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 2

&gt; A further 1.7% increase in the number of 
preschool children treated in the School Dental 
Service reflecting a focus on reducing the 
incidence of early childhood caries. 

&gt; In line with oral health s integral role within 
general health, the number of public dental 
patients receiving short interventions for tobacco 
cessation increased again with more than 7,100 
patients receiving one or more QUIT interventions. 

&gt; Sustained excellent outcomes in a range of 
indicators of clinical quality including retreatment 
rates for a range of services. 

&gt; Involvement in the development of the new 
National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024.  

&gt; Continuation in the Child Dental Benefits Schedule 
program with $15.6m revenue generated.

&gt; Finalisation of the SA Health public tender process 
for a Dental Education Partner with the University 
of Adelaide being the successful bidder. SA Dental 
Service contributed a significant amount of work 
in July   December 2014 towards development 
of the Request for Proposal and in evaluating the 
tender bids. In January   June 2015 significant 
work was required in developing the 30 year 
Partnership Agreement between Central Adelaide 
Local Health Network/SADS and the University of 
Adelaide.

&gt; A significant outcome of this process is that the 
University will fund and build a new Adelaide 
Dental Hospital (ADH) at the West End Health 
precinct. The new ADH will be designed and 
developed in collaboration with SA Dental Service 
and will be managed by SA Dental Service when it 
opens in mid-2017.

&gt; Another significant outcome of the Partnership 
Agreement was the commencement of a post 
graduate course to train Dental Therapists to treat 
adults as well as children.  

&gt; In February 2016 the SA Dental Service Executive 
endorsed a recommendation to integrate the 
Health Promotion division into the Service Quality 
and Performance Improvement division. The 
change will take effect from July 2016

Geoff Franklin
Executive Director
SA Dental Service

Executive Director s 
Report 2015-16
Geoff Franklin

SA Dental Service has its own suite of strategic 
outcomes 2011-2018 within the framework of the 
SA Health Care Plan and the Department for Health 
and Ageing s Strategic Directions. The SA Dental 
Service strategic outcomes formed the framework 
for activities during the 2015-16 financial year. 
Highlights of the year include:

&gt; A balanced budget, which has been achieved 
every year for at least the past decade.

&gt; Further focus on the Aboriginal Liaison Program 
connecting Aboriginal communities with 
mainstream public dental services. As a result 
there was a further 2% increase in the number 
of Aboriginal children treated in SA Dental 
Service facilities and a 1% increase in the number 
of Aboriginal adults, building on incremental 
increases in previous years.

&gt; On average 69 Homeless clients per month were 
referred for care, an increase of 8% over the 
previous year.  

&gt;  Over the past year 652 (78%) Supported 
Residential Facilities (SRF) residents have received 
dental treatment which compares favourably 
with attendance patterns of the general 
population and is an extremely positive result for 
this population group.



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 3

Strategic Directions
SA Dental Service Strategic Outcomes for 2011-2018

Strategic Outcome 1   The oral health of the South Australian population is improved and oral health 
inequalities are reduced with a particular focus on:

&gt; people living in rural and remote areas
&gt; Aboriginal people
&gt; people experiencing homelessness
&gt; people in Supported Residential Facilities
&gt; older people living in the community and in residential care
&gt; pre-school children 
&gt; people with chronic diseases
&gt; migrants with a refugee background

Strategic Outcome 2   Oral health is sustainably integrated into the wider health system.

Strategic Outcome 3   The community and private dental sector are involved in the planning, design and 
monitoring of public dental services.

Strategic Outcome 4   SA Dental Service is active in the development of public oral health policy at a State 
level and National level.

Strategic Outcome 5   Population based health promotion underpins all of SA Dental Service Programs and 
clinical programs have an increased focus on prevention and early intervention.

Strategic Outcome 6   Client focused quality systems drive improved clinical and non clinical services which are 
demonstrably efficient and effective.

Strategic Outcome 7   SA Dental Service is an employer of choice, has sufficient skilled clinical and non clinical 
workforce and is making full and flexible use of its capabilities.

Strategic Outcome 8   SA Dental Service is an active partner with the dental tertiary education and 
research sectors.

Strategic Outcome 9   Public dental infrastructure supports the provision of contemporary public dental 
services and is integrated with other health services wherever possible.



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 4

SA Dental Service Vision
Good oral health is essential for overall health and well being. A healthy mouth has a positive impact on 
physical, mental and social well being, hence healthy smile - healthy life.  

Mission

Working with the community to enable South Australians to achieve better oral health and well being through
&gt; health promotion
&gt; timely dental treatment with a focus on prevention and early intervention
&gt; support for education and research.

Values



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 5

Organisational Structure
SA Dental Service 

Chief 
Executive Officer

CALHN CALHN
   WHS 
   HR
   Finance
   Business Reform
   Asset Services

Shared Services
  Accounts
   Payable
  Pay Office

SA Health
  ICT (e-Health)
  Biomed
  Procurement

Chief Operating 
Officer
CALHN

Executive Director,
SA Dental Service/
General Manager

Statewide 
Dental Services

Statewide
Dental 
Services

Director 
Health 

Promotion

Manager 
Corporate 
Statewide

General 
Manager
Adelaide 
Dental 

Hospital

Director 
Service 

Quality &amp;
Performance 
Improvement

  School Dental 
Service 

  Community 
Dental Service

  Private Sector 
Schemes

  Remote Dental 
Services

  Attraction and 
Retention

  Teaching Clinics
  Oral &amp; 

Maxillofacial 
Surgery

  Special Needs 
Unit

  Infection Control
  Specialist 

Restorative Unit
  Orthodontic Unit

  Safety and Quality
  Clinical Risk
  Program 

Development
  Capital and 

Service Planning
  Client Relations
  Program 

Evaluation
  Research Programs

  Health Promotion
  Communication
  Aboriginal Oral 

Health Program

  Risk Management
  Policy 

Administration
  Contracts/Leases
  Corporate Records
  Asset 

Management
  ICT/Procurement
  Business 

Management



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16

Statewide Dental 
Services Division

Statewide Dental Services provide dental services 
to children and eligible adults through two core 
programs, the School Dental Service and the 
Community Dental Service. Special arrangements 
apply for those who may be particularly vulnerable 
to the consequences of poor oral health including 
babies and young children, Aboriginal clients, clients 
with mental health issues, older people and people 
experiencing homelessness. Those arrangements 
may include priority access to care and/or free care. 

In addition to services provided by qualified 
clinicians, general dental services in School and 
Community Dental Services are also provided 
by undergraduate dental students and students 
in the Bachelor of Oral Health Program. School 
and Community Dental Service staff are involved 
in the clinical supervision and training of these 
undergraduate students.

School Dental Service  

The School Dental Service offers a comprehensive 
dental care program to all children up until their 
18th birthday. This care is free of charge to all pre-
school children.  It is also free for primary school 
and high school students with a school card, or who 
have or are dependents of a concession cardholder. 
Children and young people may also receive free 
care under the Commonwealth Child Dental Benefits 
Schedule, which from January 2014 pays scheduled 
amounts to the provider for dental care to children 
in families eligible for a range of Commonwealth 
means tested payments, including Family Tax Benefit 
Part A. All other primary school and high school 
students are required to pay a small fee for each 
general course of care they receive, to a maximum of 
one fee per calendar year for each child.

Care is provided by teams of Dentists, Dental 
Therapists and Dental Assistants who work from a 
network of 45 clinics and mobile vans throughout 
the state. Many of these clinics are located within 
Primary Schools while others are mobile services to 
remote locations such as Leigh Creek, Nepabunna 
and Marree. 

Private dentists provide school dental services, under 
a capitation agreement, to approximately 1,400 
children who reside in areas remote from a school 
dental clinic. No client fees apply for these services.  

General Anaesthetics are required for some young 
children with extensive oral health care needs 
and these are provided both at local hospitals by 
SA Dental Service dentists and under contractual 
arrangements with the Department of Paediatric 
Dentistry of the Women s and Children s Hospital. 

Children are examined on a regular basis according 
to their individual needs and receive a full range 
of preventive and treatment based services. These 
services are provided mainly by Dental Therapists 
who work under a structured professional 
relationship with dentists, in accordance with their 
conditions of employment, supported by Dental 
Assistants.

Community Dental Service  

The Community Dental Service provides emergency 
and routine dental services to adults who are the 
holders of a concession card. Urgent needs are 
attended to promptly, while routine care is provided 
after recourse to a waiting list. 

While the majority of care is provided by dentists, 
some is provided by dental hygienists and extended 
care dental therapists who have received additional 
training to provide care to adults, all of whom 
operate from a network of 35 clinics located 
throughout the state. This care is supplemented 
by private dentists through a range of schemes 
such as the Emergency Dental Scheme, General 
Dental Scheme, Pensioner Denture Scheme, and the 
Aboriginal Dental Scheme. Client fees apply for most 
services but some preventive items are provided at 
no cost.

Two Domiciliary Dental teams operate in the 
Adelaide metropolitan area and provide services to 
homebound people in private homes and Residential 
Aged Care Facilities. 

Remote Dental Services  

The Remote Dental Service team responsibilities include:
&gt; Strategic planning to meet service needs in remote 

areas, in particular for Aboriginal communities.
&gt; Contractual arrangements with private dentists 

to provide services in remote locations such as 
Coober Pedy.

&gt; Visiting services by SA Dental Service staff, for 
example, services to children in Ceduna.

&gt; Output or other funded services through 
Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

Page 6



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16

Schemes Unit  

This team has a range of responsibilities for 
predominantly externally sourced services including:
&gt; The payment of private practice scheme invoices 

including Emergency Dental Scheme, General 
Dental Scheme, Aboriginal Dental Scheme, 
Pensioner Dental Scheme and Capitation.

&gt; Fee Schedules for services provided through 
private practitioners.

&gt; Clinical quality issues relating to the outsourced 
provision of oral health services.

The Adelaide Dental 
Hospital Division
The Adelaide Dental Hospital (ADH) is one of the 
two service provision arms of SA Dental Service 
and is a core component of the SA Government s 
approach to providing public dental care. The ADH 
fulfils a number of essential roles including:
&gt; the only dental teaching hospital in South 

Australia that provides facilities, management and 
staff to support the training of undergraduate and 
postgraduate students of the School of Dentistry 
of the University of Adelaide 

&gt; the sole statewide referral centre for specialist and 
complex oral health care services

&gt; provision of general and specialist public dental 
services, continuing education, some specialist 
and treatment planning advice to SA Dental 
Service professional staff 

&gt;  The provision of a specialist network and advice 
supports the acute medical sector in SA.

General and emergency dental care is largely 
provided by undergraduate dental and oral health 
students under the supervision of SA Dental Service.

Specialist services in the ADH are provided by 
a combination of staff and visiting specialists, 
academic staff of the University and significantly by 
postgraduate students in specialty training programs.

The range of specialty services provided include:
&gt; Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
&gt; Orthodontics 
&gt; Endodontics
&gt; Periodontics 
&gt; Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics 
&gt; Special Needs Dentistry. 

In addition to managing the operation of the ADH, 
and providing patient care, staff are involved in the 

Page 7

clinical supervision and training of undergraduate 
and postgraduate students. 

Because of its historic relationship with the Royal 
Adelaide Hospital (RAH), the ADH provides dental 
services to inpatients of the RAH and operates 
an after hours on-call service through the RAH 
Accident and Emergency Department. All patients 
requiring general anaesthesia for dental or oral 
and maxillofacial surgery procedures are admitted 
and treated in RAH theatres.  Dental technicians 
attached to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit 
provide maxillofacial prostheses on referral from 
metropolitan hospitals. 

In addition to providing specialist support to dentists 
in SA Dental Service Community and School Dental 
Services, the ADH also accepts a limited number of 
referrals from the private sector. These patients are 
accepted in circumstances where the resources of 
the Hospital are better able to accommodate the 
needs of particularly complex or difficult cases.

Health Promotion Division

The Health Promotion Unit works in partnership with 
SA Dental Service staff, external agencies, clients and 
the wider community to promote oral health as an 
integral part of general health and wellbeing.

The Health Promotion Unit has responsibility for:
&gt;  incorporating health promotion principles through 

organisational policies and work practices
&gt;  implementing population health promotion 

programs to improve oral health



&gt;  developing evidence-based oral health resources 
to support staff promote oral health in the 
community

&gt;  assisting staff to plan and implement local health 
promotion initiatives

&gt;  developing strategic partnerships and providing 
education and training that increase oral health 
knowledge and practice

&gt;  managing internal and external communication 
strategies to ensure consistency of message and 
branding

&gt;  conducting staff satisfaction and culture surveys.

Service Quality and 
Performance Improvement 
(SQ&amp;PI) Division 
The SQ&amp;PI Division has a strategic, organisation 
wide focus, and provides leadership to, and works 
collaboratively with, all SA Dental Service Divisional 
teams to challenge and support service improvement 
and program development.  SQ&amp;PI promotes public 
oral health principles, drives quality and service 
improvement and provides high level advice and 
leadership with respect to:
&gt; Strategic and operational planning
&gt; Safety, quality and clinical risk management
&gt; Client relations and the management of consumer 

feedback
&gt; Program planning and development
&gt; Capital and infrastructure planning and development
&gt; Program Evaluation and Research.

The SQ&amp;PI Division comprises the following Units:
&gt; Quality, Patient Safety, Clinical Risk and Workforce 

Development 
&gt; Client Relations 
&gt; Service Planning 
&gt; Evaluation and Research.
 
SQ&amp;PI leads service improvement by:
&gt; Promoting a culture of safety and quality as well 

as clinical learning
 -  Engaging with staff to positively influence the 

quality and safety culture of the organisation 
in recognition that improvement has to be an 
integral part of what the organisation does.

&gt; Developing Programs
 - Exploration and development of new and 

innovative models of care
 - Implementation of the SA Health Care Plan, 

State and National Oral Health Plans
 - Identification of at risk population groups and 

their oral health needs
 - Development of programs for at risk population 

groups.
&gt; Seeking and securing capital funding to support 

the provision of public oral health services
 - Identification of infrastructure requirements
 - Pursuit of capital funding opportunities
 - Oversight of capital developments.

&gt; Evaluating programs and organisational clinical 
performance

 - Provision of program analysis and reporting
 - Development of management information  

systems 
 - Conducting and/or overseeing evaluation and 

research projects

Page 8 SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16



Page 9

 - Supporting research involving SA Dental Service 
clients and staff.

&gt; Promoting evidence-based approaches to service 
and program delivery

&gt; Promoting client-centred approaches to enhance 
service quality

 - Promoting and facilitating good consumer 
practice at the interface between staff and 
clients

 - Developing and promoting mechanisms to 
facilitate effective management of consumer 
feedback

 - Monitoring consumer experience.

Corporate Services Division
The Corporate Services Division provides non-
clinical support services to SA Dental Service for the 
management of risk and corporate records, as well 
as policy and procedure administration, contract 
development, business management and executive 
support services.  

The Division leads strategic work for SA Dental 
Service via strong links with the consolidated support 
services such as eHealth Systems, Procurement and 
Supply Chain Management, Biomedical Engineering, 
Corporate Finance and Property Management, all of 
which report under SA Health. There are also close 
links with the Central Adelaide Local Health Network 
(CALHN) Asset and Security Management Unit 
who are responsible for building maintenance and 
management via the Across Government Facilities 
Management Arrangement.

SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16

Other non-clinical support services are provided by 
SA Health staff out-posted to CALHN, who work 
closely with SA Dental Service in areas such as 
Human Resources, Finance and Business Advisory 
Service, and Worker Health and Safety. Links are 
also maintained with Shared Services SA who 
provide Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable and 
Payroll functions under the Department for Premier 
and Cabinet.



Page 10

Population Oral Health Program 

The Population Oral Health Program aims to increase 
the number of preschool children attending dental 
services. A total of 15,667 pre-school children had 
been referred to the program by 30 June 2016, 
14.5% of whom identified as being of Aboriginal 
and Torres Strait Islander decent.   

Child and Family Health Service (CaFHS) nurses 
referred 85% of external Lift the Lip referrals in 
2015-16; 14 training sessions were carried out for 
external Lift the Lip referrers. The Lift the Lip Work-
practice for SA Dental Service referrers was updated 
to provide two referral processes for SADS clinical 
staff, one for high-risk screening in areas with high 
demand and one for screening and recruiting in 
areas with low demand.

Of the total referrals received in 2015/2016, 48% 
of children were aged under 4 years at the time of 
referral, the same as in the previous year.  

Aboriginal Oral Health

Since 2012 SA Dental Service has received 
Closing the Gap (CTG) funding to support the 
implementation of the Aboriginal Health Care Plan 
in South Australia. This Closing the Gap funding 
has been used to employ Aboriginal Oral Health 
Project Officers to engage the Aboriginal and 
Torres Strait Islander community, raise oral health 
awareness and provide information about accessing 
dental services at community and school dental 
clinics across South Australia. 

Due to the uncertainty of ongoing CTG funding post 
2015-16, one ongoing Project Officer position was 
funded by SA Dental Service operational budget.

Report on the 
Implementation of the 
SA Dental Service Strategic 
Plan - Progress as at June 2016

Strategic Outcome 1 

After continuous deterioration since the late-1990s, 
the amount of permanent tooth dental decay in 
12 year old children has reduced by 24% since 2008.  
The 12 year-old mean DMFT is now 0.79, compared 
with 1.05 in 2008.

The average 6 year-old deciduous decay experience is 
now 2.35 teeth affected, which is approximately mid-
range since 2008, but remains higher than pre-2007.

Improved health and reduced health 
inequalities

6 year old Mean DMFT SA SDS

2.5

2.4

2.3

2.2

2.1

2.0

1.9

20
05

20
06

20
07

20
08

20
09

20
10

20
11

20
13

20
14

20
15

20
15

/1
6

20
12

12 year old Mean DMFT SA SDS

1.1

1.0

0.9

0.8

0.7

20
05

20
06

20
07

20
08

20
09

20
10

20
11

20
12

20
14

20
15

20
15

/1
6

20
13

Number of new children seen under the
 Lift the Lip  program by SDS

1400

1200

1000

  800

  600

   400

  200

2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16

      0

SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 11

Aboriginal ADULT PATIENTS

5000

4500

4000

3500

3000

2500

2000

  1500
  1000
  500

20
05

/0
6

20
06

/0
7

20
07

/0
8

20
08

/0
9

20
09

/1
0

20
10

/1
1

20
11

/1
2

20
12

/1
3

20
13

/1
4

20
14

/1
5

20
15

/1
6

      0

16
78

16
00 18

91

28
77

33
96

38
77 41

12 42
74 45

73 48
03 48

73

Aboriginal CHILD PATIENTS

4000

4500

5000

3000

3500

2500

2000

1500

  1000

  500

20
05

/0
6

20
06

/0
7

20
07

/0
8

20
08

/0
9

20
09

/1
0

20
10

/1
1

20
11

/1
2

20
12

/1
3

20
13

/1
4

20
14

/1
5

20
15

/1
6

      0

28
95

28
56

28
11

32
17

32
94 3

56
5

40
23

44
03 45

08

45
58 46

44

In January 2016, SA Health, Aboriginal Health Branch 
contracted the South Australian Health and Medical 
Research Institute (SAHMRI) Aboriginal Health Research 
unit, Wardliparringga to conduct a rapid review evaluation 
of Closing the Gap funded programs. The Aboriginal 
Health Branch submitted a budget bid for 12 months 
recurrent funding (2016/17) for a further in depth review of 
existing programs and models of care as well as renewal 
of the Aboriginal Health Care Plan, due to expire in 2016.

The SA Dental Service Aboriginal Oral Health 
Program (AOHP) continues to provide state-wide 
priority, free dental care for all eligible Aboriginal and 
Torres Strait Islander clients. This priority free care is 
embedded within SADS routine clinical care.

In 2015-16, 4873 Aboriginal adults were treated 
through the Aboriginal Liaison Program. This is an 
increase of 1% compared to last year and 26% 
increase since 2010/2011 baseline. 

In 2015-16, 4644 Aboriginal children attended SDS 
an increase of 2% compared to last year and 30% 
increase from 2010/11baseline.

Homelessness and Oral Health Project (HOHP)

The Homelessness and Oral Health Program 
continues to deliver a flexible and accessible dental 
treatment pathway for adults who are homeless 
or at risk of homelessness in the Adelaide city and 
metropolitan areas and a number of country areas.  

The Program demonstrates the value of multi-
disciplinary, primary health care approaches in 
improving the oral health of referred clients, many of 
whom have exceptional needs, substance use issues, 
and complex mental and general health diagnoses.

Since its inception the Homelessness and Oral Health 
Program has successfully connected with over 50 
key homelessness sector agencies. Promotion of 
the Program by the homelessness sector workforce 
in their day-to-day interactions with clients is a key 
factor in increasing client engagement, trust and 
willingness to attend their dental appointments. 

Key elements of the Program include:
&gt; an education and intervention package enabling 

homelessness sector staff to integrate a simple 
oral health assessment within routine client 
assessment processes and to refer clients in need 
of dental care

&gt; dental treatment for referred clients which is timely, 
free of charge, and available in all SA Dental Service 
adult clinics and some private clinics.

&gt; case-management to support and sustain 
continuity of care.

In 2015-16 over 800 people were referred for 
dental care as a result of this program which 
successfully removes actual and perceived barriers 
to oral health care for people experiencing 
homelessness in South Australia.

Homeless Referrals - Annual

600

700

800

900

500

400

300

 200

 100
 24

 279

656

772

835

656

      0
Total Referrals

2011/12
Total Referrals

2012/13
Total Referrals

2013/14
Total Referrals

2014/15
Total Referrals

2015/16



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 12

Supported Residential Facility (SRF) 
Dental Program
 
People living in SRFs tend to have complex and 
diverse needs; many have a history of chronic 
homelessness and face significant barriers in 
accessing mainstream health services. In South 
Australia there are currently 25 SRFs accommodating 
around 830 residents. 

The SRF Dental Program commenced in 2004 and 
continues to offer client-focused dental treatment 
for all residents of licenced pension-only SRFs. The 
Program s ongoing success and effectiveness is 
underpinned by its partnership approach involving 
SRF residents, SRF Managers and care staff, external 
support agency staff, and public and private dental 
professionals. Regular interaction with these 
external partners supports greater awareness of the 
importance of oral health, and improved engagement 
and oral health outcomes for SRF residents. 

Over the past year around 652 (78%) SRF residents 
have received dental treatment which compares 
favourably with attendance patterns of the general 
population. 

Innovation in Oral Health and Mental Health Project  

In 2015, SA Dental Service successfully applied 
for a second round of grant funding from the 
Central Adelaide and Hills Medicare Local Partners 
in Recovery. The funding supported phase 2 of the 
Innovation in Oral Health and Mental Health Project.  

Phase 2 aimed to achieve better oral health 
outcomes for people with mental illness by 
improving oral health awareness and skills of 
mental health service workers, community 
pharmacists and clients.

The second phase of the project focussed on 
prevention, improving collaboration between service 
providers and resource development. This was 
achieved by:
&gt; establishing relationships with mental health and 

pharmacy sector staff
&gt; delivering oral health education sessions to increase 

the capacity of non-dental staff
&gt; developing educational resources, including an 

on-line oral health training package, videos and 
written information, in consultation with key 
stakeholders and clients

&gt; working with the Pharmaceutical Society of 
Australia to develop a National Oral Health 
Education Program, due to commence in 2017.

Strategic Outcome 2

Building Better Oral Health Communities

The Commonwealth funded Building Better Oral 
Health Communities project was led by SA Dental 
Service as a public dental provider/ community aged 
care partnership. The project successfully demonstrated 
that home care providers can support older people to 
maintain good oral health through appropriate oral 
health assessment, care plan development, service 
delivery and referral to dental care. 

This approach actively supports the concept of 
ageing well at home by providing community 
based prevention and early detection of oral health 
problems, oral health quality improvement strategies 
for home care service delivery and improved oral 
health knowledge and skills of home care workers. 

Recommendations for sustainable change indicate 
that improving oral health for older people has 
practice and policy implications which require 
ongoing inter-sectorial facilitation involving aged 
care, vocational health education and dental sectors. 

SRF Patients Seen Annually

700

600

500

  400

  300

   200

  100

2006/07

SRF External PATIENTS

2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16
      0

SRF Internal PATIENTS

215

169

190

195

305

199

318

168

327

174

350

212

416

174

383

178

456

205

457

195

Oral health is sustainably integrated 
into the wider health system

 Year           2011/12    2012/13    2013/14    2014/15    2015/16

 HOHP
 Referrals per      4.0         23.3       54.7        64.3       69.6
 Month (Av)



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 13

Strategic Outcome 3

Consumer Advisory Panel  

The SA Dental Service Consumer Advisory Panel 
(CAP) was established in 1999 as a sub-committee 
of SA Dental Service Executive.  Panel members 
are representative of each of the major population 
groups to whom public dental services are provided. 

CAP s role is to advise the Executive Director on 
effective consumer participation in oral health 
programs, operational policy and strategy and 
impact on quality oral health service outcomes.  
CAP also advocates to the Executive Director on 
behalf of the community to promote attention 
and sensitivity to the needs of disadvantaged and 
marginalised consumers and communities. 
 
During 2015-16 CAP was actively involved in 
&gt; advocating on behalf of consumers for 

improved access to and increased physical 
parking drop off/pick up areas for the new 
Adelaide Dental Hospital

&gt; the development of infographics on consumer 
feedback and safety and quality data, for 
posting on the SA Dental Service website

&gt; redevelopment of consumer information 
and work practices related to Rights and 
Responsibilities 

&gt; redevelopment of several pages of the SA 
Dental Service Website  

&gt; promoting information about SA Dental Service 
to their communities of interest.

SA Dental Service - Measuring Consumer 
Experience   

The April 2016 Survey focussed on ascertaining 
client experiences of public dental services for 
adults.  Surveys were forwarded to a random 
sample of 500 clients aged over 18 years who had 
completed an emergency or general course of 
dental care at a Community Dental Service clinic 
or the Adelaide Dental Hospital within one to two 
weeks prior to receipt of a  Consumer Experience 
Survey  form. The survey group included clients 
living in metropolitan and country areas, as well 
as being from ATSI and CALD backgrounds. The 
return rate was 34% (171 respondents).

Oral Health 
for Older People Project   

The Oral Health for Older People Study was led by The 
Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health 
(ARCPOH) in collaboration with SA Dental Service 
and general medical practitioners (GPs) from three 
Medical Local areas (now Primary Health Networks). 
The study followed oral and general health outcomes 
for patients referred to public dental care following 
the inclusion of oral health screening questions 
with Annual Health Assessments undertaken by 
GPs for people 75 years and older. Patients referred 
immediately were compared with those waitlisted.  

Results found participating older people had worse 
oral health and oral health-related quality of life 
than the national population of that age. Common 
risk factors for poor oral and general health were 
low socioeconomic status, comorbidity of chronic 
conditions and high nutritional risk. Assessment 
of the need for dental care and referral to public 
dental care by GPs demonstrated improvement 
in older people s self-rated oral health and their 
oral health-related quality of life over one year 
however no impact on general health and quality 
of life was identified.  No difference in health 
outcomes were detected between older people 
referred to clinics immediately and those referred 
after 3 months waitlisting.

Study recommendations conclude that oral health 
screening questions be integrated into the Annual 
Health Assessments for people 75 years and 
older, that a standardised GP public dental care 
referral pathway be established and that older 
people eligible for public dental care be given 
opportunities to access timely dental treatment.
 

The community and private dental sector 
are involved in the planning, design and 
monitoring of public dental services



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 14

Similar to both the November 2014 Pilot Phase and 
February 2015 Surveys (both of which focussed 
on services for adults) the results were generally 
positive.

Some of the key findings included:
&gt; 161 (94%) respondents rated their dental clinic 

experience as  very good  (70%) or  good  (24%)
&gt; 158 (92%) respondents considered staff 

welcoming and helpful
&gt; 162 (95%) respondents felt they were treated 

with dignity and respect
&gt; 170 (99%) respondents felt that staff either 

 always  (89%) or  sometimes  (10%) explained 
things in a way they could understand

&gt; 167 (98%) respondents felt that they  definitely  
(87%) or  to some extent  (11%) were involved 
as much as they wanted to be in decisions about 
their dental care 

&gt; of the 35 (20%) respondents who had questions, 
worries or fears about their  treatment, 80% 
noted that staff discussed these with them 

&gt; 169 (99%) respondents thought dental staff 
 definitely  (86%) or  to some extent  (13%) 
worked well together to plan and co-ordinate 
their care.

The April 2016 Survey results reinforced consistently 
received feedback about the value clients place on 
the accessibility and provision of high quality, public 
dental services.
 

Strategic Outcome 4

Conclusion of the National Partnership on 
Treating More Public Dental Patients 

The Commonwealth funded National Partnership 
Agreement (NPA) on Adult Public Dental Services 
was signed by South Australia on 3 December 2015. 
This twelve month NPA provided an additional 
$12.480m to SA and aimed to reduce pressure on 
public dental waiting lists.

Dental Service was required to provide an additional 
14,617 units of activity described as Dental 
Weighted Activity Units. 

Nearly 206,000 adult visits were recorded in 2015-16, 
a 12.3% increase above the state funded baseline. 

While some additional clinical staff were employed in the 
Adelaide Dental Hospital, the majority of the additional 
activity was generated via the greater use of private 
sector dental schemes including emergency, general, 
denture, crown and bridge and endodontic schemes. 
An additional 14,600 General Dental Scheme and an 
additional 3,200 denture offers of care were made and 
around 250 additional patients were offered specialist 
care. A private sector scheme to assist increased capacity 
for oral surgery care was introduced for the first time 
in March 2016 and around 100 patients requiring 
extraction of wisdom teeth received care.

The NPA on Adult Public Dental Services enabled 
the majority of adult public dental waiting lists to 
stabilise with waiting times at 30 June 2016 being at 
similar levels with those of July 2015.

On 23 April 2016 the Commonwealth Minister 
for Health announced there would be changes 
to the Commonwealth funding for dental care.
The announcement included a new national Child 
and Adult Public Dental Scheme would operate 
through the public sector and that the Child Dental 
Benefits Schedule (CDBS) would cease.  However, 
the legislation to close the CDBS did not pass prior to 
the Commonwealth government entering care-taker 
mode in the lead up to the Federal election to be held 
on 2 July 2016. The Commonwealth Government has 
indicated that State and Territory public sector access 
to the CDBS will continue for a further six months and 
that the NPA on Adult Public Dental Services will also 
be extended for six months. 

Australia s National Oral Health Plan 
2015-2024      

The new National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024 was 
endorsed by the Council of Australian Governments 
(COAG) Health Council in August 2015. 

The new plan provides national strategic direction 
for collaborative action on oral health over 
the next 10 years, with targeted strategies in 
six foundation areas and across four priority 
population groups.

The Executive Director of SA Dental Service, Dr 
Geoff Franklin, has continued in his role as chair 
of the national Oral Health Monitoring Group 
(OHMG).  The role of the OHMG is to monitor 
and report progress of the Plan.  The OHMG has 
commenced:
&gt; Reviewing the strategies and Key Performance 

Indicators recommended in the National Plan and 
determining which are the core KPIs and national 

SA Dental Service is active in the 
development of public oral health 
policy at a State level and National level



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 15

Strategic Outcome 5

Smoking Cessation

Consistent with oral health s integral role within 
general health, SA Dental Service introduced a 
clinic-based smoking cessation support program 
for adult clients in 2006. The program uses brief 
intervention techniques to support smokers 
interested in quitting. The program provides a 
referral pathway to the Quitline and is supported 
by Cancer Council SA and Drug and Alcohol 
Services SA. Quit information/training sessions are 
offered to ADH and SWDS staff via the Workforce 
Development calendar. 

During the year, Health Promotion supported various 
events with quitting resource material, including a 

goals that will be reported though to the COAG 
Health Council over the life of the plan.

&gt; Designing a standardised reporting framework 
to enable National reporting against the agreed 
NOHP KPIs and the ability to track changes in oral 
health outcomes.

Population based health promotion 
underpins all of SA Dental Service 
Programs and clinical programs have 
an increased focus on prevention and 
early intervention

Smoking Cessation themed Expo at the Adelaide 
Remand Centre. SA Dental Service and Cancer 
Council SA continue to use the Mighty Mouth 
resource as a support tool for smoking cessation 
conversations with Aboriginal clients.

Since the project s inception 37,012 smoking 
interventions have been recorded. 7174 persons 
received one or more QUIT records this year, 
a 2.6% increase from 2014/15. The program 
continues to be embedded into daily clinical 
practice.

Child Recall Intervals 2015-16

The reduction in median actual recall interval for 
children treated in the School Dental Service was 
sustained with a reduction to 18 months or less, 
during 2015-16. This is well below the target of 
18.7 months and achieved the shortest recalls, since 
before 2005. Recent emphasis on ensuring timely 
children s recalls, in particular for high risk children, 
has demonstrated improvement with a further 
reduction on the proportion and total number of 
overdue recalls for each risk group.

Preventive Care 2015-16   

The delivery of preventive services per client 
improved across all of SA Dental Service. Across 
the School Dental Service Fissure Sealants and 
Fluoride application for children assessed as 
being at higher risk of caries was maintained. 
The outcomes of this sustained increase in clinical 
prevention for children can be seen in the long 
term trend of the  Mean DMFT  graph on page 
10, which shows the amount of dental decay 
experience in 12 year old children attending the 

SADS TOTAL Number of People Receiving 
Short Intervention for Smoking Cessation (QUIT)

7000

8000

6000

5000

  4000

  3000

   2000

  1000

2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16
      0

3803

5065
5531

6994
7174



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 16

stable, year-on-year, but at substantially higher levels 
than two years previously when average waiting 
times were below 9 months.

The average waiting time for patients removed from 
routine care waiting lists remained stable at 13.2 
months at June 2016 compared with 13.4 months 
at June 2015. The weighted mean waiting time 
for patients being removed from denture waiting 
lists has increased by a month to 16.4 months at 
June 2016 compared with last year, but both these 
waitlists have increased since the initial NPA in 2013 
and 2014.

The combined average waiting time for Specialist 
Services at the Adelaide Dental Hospital reduced 
slightly from 18.3 months in June 2015 to 18.1 
months by June 2016.

Strategic Outcome 6

Child Dental Benefits Schedule 

From 1 January 2014 the Commonwealth 
Government introduced the Child Dental Benefits 
Schedule (CDBS) which provides payments to 
private and public dental practices for providing 
a limited range of dental care services to children 
eligible under the Schedule. Eligible children 
receive free care from SA Dental Service and 

Clinical Prevention Services
Rate per 100 Consenting Patients

70

50

40

60

30

 20

  10

20
06

/0
7

20
07

/0
8

20
08

/0
9

20
09

/1
0

20
10

/1
1

20
11

/1
2

20
12

/1
3

20
13

/1
4

20
14

/1
5

20
15

/1
6

      0

Fluoride Visits

Fissure Sealant

Dental Emergency Courses of Care
commenced per annum

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

30,000

35,000

40,000

45,000

50,000

55,000

20
05

/0
6

20
06

/07

20
07

/08

20
08

/09

20
09

/10

20
10

/11

20
11

/12

20
12

/13

20
13

/14

20
14

/15

20
15

/16

School Dental Service fell for six of the past seven 
years and is currently the lowest since 2003.

Adult dental emergencies 2015-16 

Dental emergencies treated in 2015-16 were 
29,649, a slight decrease of 889 or -2.9% since 
2014/2015.  Since the announcement of the 
cessation of the Commonwealth s Medicare Chronic 
Disease Dental Scheme (MCDDS) in late August 
2012, there has been a substantial increase in 
demand for both emergency and general services on 
the state public system.  An additional 5,172 (+21%) 
more emergency patients were seen in 2015-16, 
after the MCDDS closure, compared with the same 
period from five years before.

Waiting Lists 2015-16    

Waiting times on waitlists for general and denture 
public dental care were similar to those of 2014/15 
as shown in the graphs below.  Additional 
Commonwealth funded NPA dental services in the 
financial year allowed for the waiting time to remain 

Dental Wait Times (Months)

18

21

15

12

9

 6

   3

Specialist

Denture 

General Restorative

Ju
n-

12

Se
p-

12

D
ec

-1
2

Ju
n-

13

M
ar

-1
3

Se
p-

13

D
ec

-1
3

M
ar

-1
4

Ju
n-

14

Se
p-

14

D
ec

-1
4

M
ar

15

Ju
n-

15

Se
p-

15

D
ec

-1
5

M
ar

-1
6

Ju
n-

16

      0

Client focused quality systems drive 
improved clinical and non-clinical 
services which are demonstrably 
efficient and effective



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 17

To encourage dental care for eligible children, 
a promotional campaign was undertaken to 
ensure eligible families were aware they could 
access the CDBS at School Dental Service clinics. 
This included an online media campaign which 
launched advertisements on Facebook, enhanced 
online content on the SA Health/SA Dental 
Service website, print media advertisements and 
editorials. 

Extensive efforts continue to maximise legitimate 
CDBS claims including intensive auditing of claims 
against client records, monitoring of claim errors 
and adjustments, and retrospective claiming where 
client eligibility was confirmed during, rather than 
at the start of care.

During 2015-16 SA Dental Service received $15.6 
million in Medicare benefits, while continuing to 
maintain population oral health principles and the 
provision of clinically indicated appropriate care to 
individual children. 

2015-16 ACHS Quality of Care &amp; Clinical 
Indicators  

The SA Dental Service participates in the national 
quality clinical indicators program managed by the 
Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS).  
The main oral health care clinical indicators focus 
on monitoring and minimising returns for repeated 
care, usually on the same tooth -  also known as 
retreatment rates, or unplanned return visits for 
adult dental services (restorations, extractions and 
dentures), endodontics and children s dental care 
(restorations, pulpotomy and fissure sealants).

SA Dental Service results were statistically 
significantly more desirable than national peer 
aggregate results for four of the nine clinical 
indicator areas across both the School and 
Community Dental Services, for the first half-year 
reporting period of 2016. Most other oral quality 
indicators achieved statistically equal to or better 
than the national peer aggregate results, with only 
a small shortfall for the indicator associated with 
completing root canal treatments within 6-months 
of commencing endodontic treatment, where a high 
rate is deemed desirable.

The rate of restoration (filling) re-treatments within 6 
months, are two of the key ACHS clinical indicators.  
The CDS adult rates were significantly better than 
peer norm rates during 2014/15 and 2015-16 and 
SDS child rates were statistically significantly better 
during the second half of 2014, and the first half 
of 2016 and similar to or better than peer national 
rates during 2015.  Both these measures define 
positive quality results compared with interstate peer 
organisations, sustained over several years.

Accreditation 

SA Dental Service is accredited with the 
Australian Council on Health Care Standards 
(ACHS) until 10 March 2017.  In line with the 
annual review and progress report requirements, 
SA Dental Service submitted the required 
documentation to ACHS in July 2015. The 
progress report comprised a desktop audit which 
included:
&gt; Review and update of member details which 

outlines the role and purpose of SA Dental Service 
together with a detailed description of where and 
how services are provided

&gt; Review and update of Quality Measures for  
Standards 1, 2 and 3

&gt; Progress report against the gaps identified at the 
time of the 2013 Organisation Wide Survey.

The documentation was reviewed by one surveyor 
who assessed SA Dental service as being well on 
the path to continued accreditation at its next 
organisation wide survey in August 2016.

ACHS Clinical Indicators
Restoration Retreatment (6mths)
Cl1.1 (adult) Cl3.1 (child) 

  1%

  2%

  4%

  3%

  6%

  7%

  8%

  5%

20
11

_H
2

20
12

_H
1

20
12

_H
2

20
13

_H
1

20
13

_H
2

20
14

_H
1

20
14

_H
2

20
15

_H
2

20
15

_H
1

20
16

_H
1

      0%

Reporting Period (allow for lag for return services)

Peer Adult Peer Child

Adult         Child

include children in families receiving a number of 
means tested Commonwealth payments, including 
Family Tax Benefit Part A.



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 18

Crown &amp; Bridge Dental Scheme

The Crown &amp; Bridge Dental Scheme allows for 
referral of country residents who require simple 
crown and bridge treatment to the private sector, 
reducing the Specialist Restorative Unit waiting 
list for specialist crown and bridge treatment. This 
scheme was first implemented in 2014 through the 
National Partnership Agreement, and was continued 
through 2015-16. In 2015-16, 80 country patients 
on the Adelaide Dental Hospital crown and bridge 
waiting list had been offered treatment under the 
scheme. The uptake rate was 76%. As a result of 
these offers in conjunction with waiting list removals 
for treatment at the Adelaide Dental Hospital, the 
number of patients on the crown and bridge waiting 
list at the end of the 2015-16 year was 267, with 
the maximum waiting time at 17 months. 

Specialist Dental Scheme (Endodontics) 

The Specialist Dental Scheme (Endodontics) was 
launched in February 2013. The availability of this 
scheme provides another means by which patients 
can access specialist endodontic treatment, reducing 
the Adelaide Dental Hospital waiting list for specialist 
endodontic treatment.  In 2015-16, 70 patients on the 
endodontics waiting list had been offered treatment 
under the scheme. The uptake rate was 67%. As a 
result of these offers in conjunction with waiting list 
removals for treatment at the Adelaide Dental Hospital, 
the number of patients on the endodontic waiting 
list at the end of the 2015-16 year was 133, with the 
maximum waiting time at 4 months. 

Specialist Dental Scheme (Orthodontics) 

A pilot Specialist Dental Scheme (Orthodontics) was 
launched in December 2014, offering care to country 
patients at the top of the orthodontics priority 2 (P2) 
waiting list. This scheme aims to provide additional 
means for patients to access specialist orthodontic 
treatment, reducing the Orthodontic Unit waiting list.  
The initial round of offers for treatment under this 
scheme occurred in December 2014, with care offered 
to 30 country patients at the top of the P2 waiting list. 
At 30 June 2016, orthodontic treatment 
was underway for the14 patients accepting 
the offer. In November 2015 the second round 
of offers was extended to 80 country patients 
waiting on the orthodontics P2 
waiting list. At 30 June 2016, 38 of these 
patients had accepted the offer with assessment 
for treatment commencing. The uptake rate 

from these 2 rounds of offers for care through the 
Orthodontics Scheme is approximately 50%.

Specialist Dental Scheme (Oral Surgery)

The Specialist Dental Scheme (Oral Surgery) is a 
pilot scheme introduced in early 2016. This scheme 
provides a means for patients waiting on the Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery Royal Adelaide Hospital General 
Anaesthetic waiting list to access their care through a 
private specialist oral and maxillofacial surgeon. At 30 
June 2016, 150 patients who required extraction of 
two or more wisdom teeth were offered care under 
this scheme. The uptake rate was 66%. 

SA Dental Service Online Content

The update and maintenance of SA Dental Service 
Online content has become increasingly important 
as clients and staff use the web more frequently to 
access SA Dental Service information.

In 2015-16 the landing pages on both the SA Dental 
Service webpage and the intranet were updated 
with both including the carousel function to 
promote key messages.

Internet and Intranet hits per month

25,000

30,000

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000
Webpage Hits
Intranet Hits

Ju
n-

15

A
ug

-1
5

Se
p-

15

O
ct

-1
5

N
ov

-1
5

D
ec

-1
5

Ja
n-

16

Fe
b-

16

M
ar

16

A
pr

-1
6

M
ay

-1
6

Ju
n-

16
      0

9,586

22,884
23,786

21,041

18,552
19,191

16,242

20,579

25,711

27,278

23,319

25,583

23,975

8,328
7,720 7,901

8,619
7,033

6,074

8,831
9,346

8,263

9,643

8,138



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 19

To make it easier for parents/carers to make 
appointments for children, an online booking 
request form for School Dental Service clinics was 
embedded in the SA Dental Service webpage and 
1,202 appointment requests were received between 
February and June 2016.

 All SA Dental Service clinics were mapped using 
google maps, enabling clients to search for their 
nearest clinic and relevant information regarding 
opening times, access and services available. 

Strategic Outcome 7

Workforce Innovation - Extended Care Dental 
Therapists 

As a result of the 30 year Education Partnership 
Agreement between Central Adelaide Local 
Health Network and the University of Adelaide, 
the Graduate Certificate in Oral Health Science 
commenced in July 2015.  This workforce reform has 
been on the agenda for the public sector both locally 
and nationally for some time and now this formal 
pathway has been implemented. 

The six month post graduate course is a pathway 
for dental and oral health therapists to apply their 
traditional dental therapist scope of practice to 
clients of all ages.

Seven SA Dental Service staff were among the 
inaugural cohort of 10 students and another dental 
therapist commenced the course in January 2016. All 
eight SA Dental Service dental/oral health therapists 
successfully completed the course with a further dental 
therapist acquiring an equivalent qualification from the 
University of Melbourne.  There are now nine dental 
therapists working a minimum of 0.4 FTE treating adult 
clients in the Community Dental Service.  

Credentialling and Scope of Practice 

SA Dental Service Credentialling Committee 
maintained the credentialling status of over 500 
Dental Practitioners. This includes all non-SA Dental 
Service employees who provide and or supervise the 
provision of dental care within SA Dental Service (eg 
University Tutors). 

Voluntary Dentist Graduate Year Program 
(VDGYP)

The Commonwealth funded Voluntary Dental 
Graduate Year Program ceased in December 2015 
when graduates at Marleston, with rotations 
through the ADH and Wallaroo Community Dental 
Clinic, completed their placements. Under this 
program new dental graduates worked in the public 
sector providing treatment to eligible patients as well 
as undertaking a structured educational program to 
enhance their clinical practice. 

Oral Health Therapist Graduate Year Program 
(OHTGYP)     

This Commonwealth funded program also ceased 
in December 2015 when two graduates, based at 
the Elizabeth GP Plus Dental Clinic, completed their 
placements. The program was managed and funded 
along the same principles as the VDGYP.

Staff Biennial Conference      

Around 625 staff attended the 2016 biennial staff 
conference held on 17 June 2016. The theme for 
the day was It Starts With Us.  Key topics for the day 
included Responding to Racism, White Ribbon, Building 
a new Dental Hospital, Communicating for Success 
and A New Era. Everyday Excellence staff presentations 
relating to the theme were also a feature and were 
rated highly by attendees.

SA Dental Service is an employer of 
choice, has sufficient skilled clinical and 
non clinical workforce and is making 
full and flexible use of its capabilities



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 20

Strategic Outcome 8

In June 2014, SA Health issued a Request for 
Proposal (RFP) for an Educational Partner to join 
with SA Dental Service to provide dental care for 
eligible patients in SA. The RFP sought proposals 
from Australian Universities to use SA Dental 
Service facilities, provide dental care for patients 
through clinical placements of dental students and 
at the same time provide a capital infrastructure 
solution for the future of the Adelaide Dental 
Hospital. The University of Adelaide was the 
successful education partnership tenderer and the 
Dental Education Partnership Agreement between 
Central Adelaide Local Health Network and The 
University of Adelaide was signed in July 2015. 

Strategic Outcome 9

Adelaide Dental Hospital  

As part of the successful tender for an Educational 
Partner (Strategic Outcome 8), a new 89 dental 
chair Adelaide Dental Hospital will be constructed 
as part of the University s Health and Medical 
Sciences Building. In close proximity to the new 
Royal Adelaide Hospital, the new ADH is planned 
to open in July 2017 and will be operated and 
managed by SA Dental Service. Work on the 
design and layout of the new facility commenced 
in January 2015 and has been a major focus for 
managers and staff of the ADH during 2015-16.  

Allan Pease, widely recognised nationally and 
internationally as a communication expert, 
entertained and motivated staff and provided the 
audience with inspirational take home messages.

The current cohort of 30 and 40 year service 
recipients were acknowledged with 33 staff being 
presented with service badges and certificates.  
Due to popular demand the Unsung Hero awards 
returned and 5 staff and a work team were 
acknowledged as unsung heroes. The social media 
platform Twitter was used for the first time and 
proved to be a popular innovation.  

SA Dental Service is an active partner 
with the dental tertiary education and 
research sectors

Public dental infrastructure supports the 
provision of contemporary public dental 
services and is integrated with other 
health services wherever possible



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 21

Riverland Oral Health Centre

As part of the Education Partnership Agreement 
with the University of Adelaide a new 10 chair 
clinic will be established in the Berri campus of the 
Riverland Regional Hospital. Planning and design 
work is completed and a  sod turning  ceremony 
was held at the site on May 20th 2016 to mark the 
commencement of the building works. The building is 
due to commence clinical operations in late 2016. 

Other Infrastructure Improvements 

Improvements to clinic infrastructure continued in 
2015-16 with the following highlights:
&gt; The new 6 chair Parks Dental Clinic opened in 
    late 2015
&gt; Redevelopment of the Linden Park school dental 

clinic was completed in January 2016 
&gt; A substantial upgrade to the dental clinic located 

within Yatala Prison.  

Linden Park Dental Clinic (below)
Parks Dental Clinic (right)



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 22

Freedom of Information 
2015-16
Information Statement

The Freedom of Information Act 1991 gives 
members of the public a legally enforceable right 
to access information held by the South Australian 
Government, subject to certain restrictions.

Functions of SA Dental Service directly impacts 
on the public 

The work of SA Dental Service directly impacts on 
the public as a result of providing public dental 
services to eligible children and adults who hold 
current Pensioner Concession or Health Care Cards.

Public participation

The public can contribute to policy development 
within SA Dental Service in a number of ways. SA 
Dental Service accesses external expertise and policy 
advice through statutory and non-statutory advisory 
committees such as the Consumer Advisory Panel, 
which are comprised of both government and 
non-government representatives. SA Dental Service 
consults with major consumer groups, circulates 
discussion papers and calls for submissions on 
particular topics. It also fosters a culture of inclusion 

of communities and service providers in planning, 
development and evaluation of services. These 
processes ultimately facilitate the community s access 
to services and their informed decision making about 
service options and program developments.

Types of documents held by SA Dental Service 

SA Dental Service holds various hard copy and/
or electronic oral health publications in addition to 
administrative and client files. These include books, 
reports, reviews, serial publications, pamphlets, 
information sheets, codes of practice, surveys, 
guidelines, policies, procedures, programs, strategies, 
directories and evaluations.  

Arrangements and procedures for seeking 
access to documents

Application forms for access to documents can be 
downloaded from the SA Dental Service website, 
obtained through any clinic or provided by the 
Client Relations Unit.  The Client Relations Unit is 
responsible for processing FOI requests and is able to 
assist with any FOI related enquiries.



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 23

Applications for Access (2015-16)

Details of Applications    Personal       Non Personal    Total

New applications for the year    48  0   48

Applications brought forward from previous year   2  0     2

Total to be processed     50  0   50

  Determined      48  0   48

  Transferred in full       0  0     0

  Withdrawn        0  0     0

Totally actually processed    48  0   48

  Unfinished        0  0     0

Outcomes of Access Applications (2015-16)

Outcome description     Personal Non Personal  Total

  Full Release      47  0   47

  Partial Release       0  0     0

  Refused access (no record)      1  0     1

Total       48  0   48

 
Applications for Amendment (2015-16)

       Personal Non Personal  Total

New Amendment applications     0  0   0

Total       0  0   0

Applications for Internal Reviews (2015-16)

       Personal Non Personal  Total

New Internal Review applications    0  0   0

Total       0  0   0



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 24

Adelaide Dental Hospital Statistics
Treatment Statistics

     2012/2013 2013/2014   2014/2015          2015/2016

Patients     22,096       23,239                23,689      23,463

Attendances    77,174                 80,425                79,685      77,240

Diagnostic / Preventive    

Examinations     3,455       13,983                14,790      14,700

Consultations    12,238       12,683                13,315      12,849 

Radiographs    27,830       30,296                28,413      28,050

Periodontal treatment  
dental health education

   
18,551      17,317                17,085      16,460

Conservative Dentistry    

Temporary restorations     1,915           1,784                  1,693        1,786

Plastic restorations
(amalgam, GIC &amp; resin)   14,708     14, 405                14,292      13,756

Complex restorations        943           1,312                  1,218        1,117

Root canal treatment        947           1,175                     923           992

Prosthetic Dentistry    

Full dentures         498                 593                     608           546

Part dentures         834                 880                     929           880 

Denture relines / re-bases        186                 202                     191           217

Denture repairs         194                216                     256           252 

Denture adjustments     1,056           1,166                  1,341         1,291

Oral Surgery    

Simple extractions   12,280       14,163                14,184      13,528 

Surgical extractions     2,863           2,730                  2,777        3,373

Orthodontics    

Removable appliances**        982           1,148                  1,068        1,009

Fixed appliance
(Arches)       1,134           1,026                  1,250        1,186



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 25

Adelaide Dental Hospital Statistics (cont.)
Waiting Lists
Number of people on waiting lists

Patient Visits   seeing a dental student

  06/07   07/08      08/09      09/10     10/11      11/12      12/13      13/14      14/15      15/16

Orthodontics 1,249   1,222     1,165        708         626       1,210      1,710      1,635     1,646      1,266

Oral Surgery 1,125      819        765        494         721          895   898        877      1,343     1,509

200

0
06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 10/11 12/13 13/14 14/15 15/1611/12

400

600

800

1,000

1,200

1,600

1,400

1,800

Adelaide Dental Hospital Specialist Waiting Lists
Number of persons Waiting at 30th June

Oral Surgery

Orthodontics

5000

0
07/08 08/09 09/10 10/11 12/13 13/14 14/15 15/1611/12

10000

15000

20000

25000

30000

35000

40000

45000

Total Number of BDS Student Patient Visits per year

CDS-BDS5
SDS-BDS4

ADH
TOTAL

          08/09        09/10       10/11      11/12       12/13       13/14       14/15        15/16

Adelaide Dental Hospital       25,816     26,003     27,272     29,707     29,193     29,713     27,065      26,835

Community- BDS5         6,978       9,716       7,990       7,386       9,272       9,134       9,031      11,310

School Dental/Pedo BDS4        1,242       1,539       1,296       1,982       2,163       2,099       1,949        2,115

All                                 34,036     37,258     36,558     39,076     40,628     40,946     38,045      40,260



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 26

School Dental Service Statistics
Children under care (consents)

In 2015-16, the School Dental Service cared for 144,576 registered children; 119,822 pre-school and primary 
school children (+3,423) and 24,754 (-22) secondary school students. The number of patients under care is 
3,401 more than the 2014/15 total, and the highest number enrolled since 2009/10.

A similar number of secondary school children have been enrolled in SDS for the past six years.

The number of pre-school and primary school children enrolled in the SDS increased to levels not seen since 
before 2008.

The Medicare Teen Dental Plan voucher scheme for diagnositc and preventive dental services, covered under 
Family Tax Benefit A entitlements, ceased in December 2013.

A Commonwealth funded scheme, the Child Dental Benefits Schedule (CDBS) commenced from 
1 January 2014.

The number of children under care by the School Dental Service since 1972 is shown below:

&gt;  Note: lower secondary school participation since 1995, associated with an annual secondary school subscription.
&gt;  Note: Copayments were introduced for Primary (&amp; some Preschool) children   after first Free course of care   

for non-cardholders from January 2007.
&gt;  Pre-school aged children are now free of copayments for school dental service care.
&gt;  The Medicare Teen Dental Plan voucher scheme introduced from July 2008, also now allows non-cardholders 

to receive free SDS care in exchange for the voucher.
&gt;  The Child Dental Benefits Schedule (CDBS), a Commonwealth funded children s dental program commenced 

in January 2014. The SA School Dental Service staff are deemed eligible providers under the CDBS, but dental 
students and services under General Anaesthetic in hospitals are not entitled CDBS services.

50,000

0

19
75

19
77

19
79

19
81

19
83

19
85

19
87

19
89

19
91

19
93

19
95

19
97

19
99

20
05

/0
6

20
03

/0
4

20
01

/0
2

20
07

/0
8

20
09

/1
0

20
11

/1
2

20
13

/1
4

20
15

/1
6

100,000

150,000

200,000

250,000
SDS Number of Children Enrolled

Total Number of Children

Pre &amp; Primary

Secondary &amp; Tertiary



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 27

School Dental Service Statistics (cont.)
Dental caries experience

A patient s DMFT index is the total number of decayed, missing or filled permanent teeth and is a measure of 
decay experience. The mean DMFT for 12 year old children is presented below for years since 1977. The oral 
health of 12 year old SDS patients is represented by a mean DMFT score of 0.79 in 2015.  

While there had been noticable deterioration in children s oral health over approximately the decade leading 
up to 2008, this had stabilised at about DMFT = 1.0 for about four years, and improved annually between 
2009 and 2012. Since then the average DMFT index has stablised at around 0.8.

The average 12 year-old DMFT in 2015 is the same as 2003, at 0.79, and is the best rate observed since 2004.

1.0

0.5

0.0
1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 20152013

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

3.5

4.0

4.5

5.0

SA School Dental Service DMFT   12 year olds



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 28

School Dental Service Statistics (cont.)
Annual services per 100 children under care (registered consents)

*    Estimated 5 minute time unit
**  Estimated 15 minute time unit
#  from January 2014 Child Dental Benefits Schedule   Fluorides (as visits)
Not documented as Conc Fluoride per Tooth   

          2012/13                2013/14                2014/15                 2015/16
                          Freq        Per 100   Freq     Per 100     Freq         Per 100     Freq        Per100        
                                                                   Consents                  Consents                    Consents                    Consents

Patients               84,975                 86,666                    85,709                    84.604

Attendances                        184,509               183,222                  180,402                  176,388

Examinations              83,967      62.2      98,218       70.3    112,261      79.5     120,535      83.4

Radiographs                          92,273      68.3      99,531       71.2    103,114      73.0     102,160      70.7

Prophylaxis              15,390      11.4      19,829       14.2      22,833      16.2       22,975      15.9

#Topical Fluoride (visits)             20,235      15.0    #47,076      #33.7    #69,316      49.1       69,401      48.0

#Conc Fluoride (Teeth treated)    413,611     306.4   #198,357   #142.0                  Not Applicable since CDBS

Filling (primary + permanent)      44,544        33.0      40,474       29.0      39,996       28.3       35,193      24.3

Pulpotomy (Primary)               2,207        1.6        1,816         1.3       1,815         1.3         1,672        1.2

Root Canal Treatment                  285         0.2          244         0.2          211         0.2            219        0.2
 
Extractions        

Simple (primary+perm)             15,872       11.8     15,433       11.0      15,808       11.2      14,585      10.1

Temporary dressing               2,617         1.9       2,240         1.6        2,237         1.6        2,100        1.5

Orthodontics        

Active appliance                               331        0.2           302        0.2            272        0.2           249         0.2

Referral                                         4,916        3.6        4,300        3.1         4,334        3.1        4,675         3.2

Mouthguard                               933        0.7           724        0.5            480        0.3           497         0.3

Fissure sealant
and surface protection             80,479      59.6       81,793      58.5      91,573      64.9      87,208       60.3
   
Dental Health Education        

Child-individual*                          65,018      48.2       70,102      50.2      85,022      60.2      98,592       68.2

    small group*                               804        0.6        1,454         1.0        1,211        1.0           383         0.3

Parent-individual*             84,325      62.5      80,395       57.5      85,562      61.0      91,553       63.3

          -group**                               124         0.1             41        0.0             67        0.0           112         0.1

     



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 29

Community Dental Service Statistics 
Treatment Statistics (Community Dental Clinics and Private Sector Schemes)
Number of services provided 2015/2016

          CDS                          Contracted Privately              Total 2015/2016

           Freq  Per 100           Freq       Per 100  Freq          Per 100
                                                      Patients                              Patients           Patients

Number of patients         45,033                22,210                   64,303 

Patient attendances       103,904                            51,820                 156,229 
 
Examinations                      44,793     99.5               15,139             68.2      60,183 93.6
 
Radiographs                      50,184   111.4               19,762             89.0     70,141         109.1

Periodontal treatment /         
66,000   146.6               13,702             61.7     80,021         124.4

dental health education   

Temporary restorations           3,213       7.1                    345               1.6       3,558   5.5

Plastic restorations         
44,704     99.3               24,692           111.2     69,709         108.4

(amalgam, GIC &amp; resin)      

Complex restorations              105       0.2                       3               0.0         108   0.2

Root canal treatments              958       2.1                    143               0.6      1,101   1.7

Denture units                        1,744       3.9                 5,729             25.8      7,497 11.7

Denture relines / rebases              236       0.5                    385               1.7         631   1.0

Denture repairs                           237       0.5                 6,882              31.0      7,131 11.1

Denture adjustments           1,967       4.4                      68                0.3      2,044   3.2

Simple extractions         24,061     53.4                 6,092              27.4    30,208 47.0

Surgical extractions              397       0.9                    863                3.9      1,265   2.0



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 30

Community Dental Service Statistics (cont.) 
Treatment statistics   service mix profile 
(Community Dental Clinics and Private Sector Schemes combined)
Number of services provided for the past four years

                                            2012/2013         2013/2014              2014/2015             2015/2016
    Freq Rate     Freq      Rate        Freq       Rate          Freq  Rate 
                                                                 Per 100                  Per 100                  Per 100                 Per 100  
                                                                 Patients                 Patients                Patients                Patients

Number of patients             53,846                  65,551         57,114                    64,303

Patient attendances           131,350                167,479       131,798                  156,229

Examinations                          48,938     90.9        57,983      88.5      52,091 91.2      60,183      93.6

Radiographs                          55,652   103.4        68,626    104.7      53,083 92.9      70,141    109.1

Periodontal treatment / 
dental health education           

  47,883     88.9        69,537    106.1      64,503     112.9      80,021    124.4

Temporary restorations               3,076       5.7          3,246        5.0        3,398   5.9        3,558        5.5
  
Plastic restorations 
(amalgam, GIC &amp; resin)             59,200   109.9        86,014    131.2      47,911 83.9      69,709    108.4

Complex restorations                    22       0.0            15        0.0   38   0.1           108        0.2
  
Root canal treatments               1,120       2.1          1,702        2.6 973   1.7        1,101        1.7
      
Denture units                            6,096     11.3          7,127      10.9        6,047 10.6        7,497      11.7

Denture relines / rebases                  438       0.8          593        0.9 611   1.1           631        1.0

Denture repairs                            5,957     11.1          6,940      10.6        7,114 12.5        7,131      11.1

Denture adjustments               1,588       2.9          1,924        2.9        1,989   3.5        2,044        3.2
 
Simple extractions             23,684     44.0        28,645      43.7      26,920  47.1     30,208      47.0

Surgical extractions               1,271       2.4          1,851        2.8 889   1.6        1,265        2.0



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 31

Community Dental Service Statistics (cont.) 
State Adult Dental Waiting Lists
Waiting lists at Community Dental Service Clinics   adult dental services

 

State Average Waiting Time (months) at Community Dental Service Clinics

                           06/07    07/08     08/09     09/10    10/11    11/12    12/13     13/14    14/15      15/16

Prosthetic Waiting Lists    6,378    6,075     3,776    3,043     1,615       927       429     1,861     2,823    2,501

Conservative Waiting Lists   42,051   32,429   31,289   28,143   23,951  21,373  13,473   20,371  37,324   33,026

                           06/07     07/08     08/09    09/10    10/11     11/12    12/13    13/14     14/15    15/16

Prosthetic Waiting Lists     40.6      38.7       27.8       28.6      16.6       14.8      11.4       9.0       15.4       16.3

Conservative Waiting Lists       22.6        19.1          17.3         17.7        16.8         16.0        11.5          8.4         13.4         13.2

10,000

20,000

30,000

40,000

50,000

60,000

70,000

0
05/06 06/07 08/0907/08 09/10 10/11 12/13 13/14 14/15 15/1611/12

CDS State Total Waiting Lists Restorative and Prosthetic
Number of Persons Names on Waiting Lists

Prosthetic Waiting List

Restorative Waiting List



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 32

Aboriginal Dental Scheme Statistics 
Treatment Provided 2010/2011   2015/2016

Aboriginal Liaison Project Statistics

                                           2010/2011  2011/2012  2012/2013   2013/2014   2014/2015  2015/2016

Practices participating               55      56                32              18                 25             21

Claims submitted                         847    611             566              356              292           240

Examinations                                      723    503             519              318              234           202

Dental prevention                           91      57               54              163              127           107

Restorations                                      272    222             185              412              299           221

Endodontics                                          3        1                 2                  4                  3               0

Radiographs                                      370    235             379              573              396           294

Extractions                                      408    275             244              274              198           127

Surgical extractions / oral surgery              75      82               85                79                25             15

Relief of pain / Temporary filling              11        9               11                  4                  2               5

Dentures units                                        46      29                 5                17                34             31

Repairs / maintenance to Dentures              15      16               11                  5                  1               0

Adjustments or relines                             3        5                 2                  0                  0               1

                                           2009/2010   2010/2011   2011/2012  2012/2013  2013/2014   2014/2015

Number of patients                    1,351           1,840         2,216          2,500          2,934          3,377

Patient attendances                    3,679 4,625            5,557          6,322          6,743          7,850

Courses of care                                 1,425 1,951            2,352          2,690          3,150          3,688

Examinations                                 1,511 2,108         2,442          2,767          3,188          3,964

Dental prevention /
periodontal treatment                       909 1,189         2,197          2,898          3,866          5,465

Restorations                                 1,792 2,147         2,616          3,289          3,172          3,678

Endodontics                                      15      25              28               48               52               44

Radiographs                                 1,534 2,151         2,756          3,307          3,686           4,543

Extractions                                 1,506 1,812         2,338          2,518          2,339           2,847

Surgical extractions / oral surgery              7      10                5               12                 8                28

Relief of pain / temporary filling            75    149            129             213             271              219

Dentures units                                    129    100            139               86             130              140

Repairs / maintenance to dentures          15        8              12               11               10                20

Adjustments or relines                         53      52              75               71               66              119



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 33

Human Resources Statistics 

Number of Employees by Salary Bracket

Status of Employees in Current Position

Number of Executives by Status in Current Position, Gender and Classification

Employees       Health Units                Org Level             DSSA

Persons           886 

FTEs         661.82

Number of Persons Separated from the agency 
during the last 12 months        114

Number of Persons Recruited to the agency 
during the 15/16 financial year        112

Number of Persons Recruited to the agency during the 15/16 
financial year AND who were active/paid at June 2016        79

Number of Persons on Leave without Pay at 30 June 2016       29

Male         15.69     15.08

Female         84.31                  84.92

Gender         % Persons   %FTE

EXEC0A   1           1      1         50         1           50                 2

Total                           1           1                  1         50                  1           50                 2

Classification            Term Untenured                                                         Total                                   

                                                                                              % of total                     % of total
            Male      Female   Male         Execs        Female         Execs             Total
  

 Male          74.96       18.33                1           5.48           99.77

 Female         470.02       78.79                                 1                     12.24         562.05

 Total         544.98       97.12                                 2                     17.72         661.82

 Male            92        22                                              1                       24             139

 Female          605      102                                              1                       39             747

 Total          697      124                                              2                       63             886

FTEs Gender         Ongoing       Short-term Contract      Long-term Contract      Casual        Total

Persons Gender         Ongoing       Short-term Contract      Long-term Contract      Casual Total

0 - $57,599           12    434   446

$57,600 to $73,299          25    113   138

$73,300 to $93,799          14    113               127

$93,800 to $118,399          18      30     48

$118,400 Plus           70      57   127

Total          139     747   886

Salary Bracket         Male             Female             Total



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 34

Human Resources Statistics (cont.) 
Total Days Leave Taken   Needs to be divided by average FTE figure for the financial year for per FTE figure

Number of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Employees

Number of Employees by Age Bracket by Gender

Cultural and Linguistic Diversity

Total Number of Employees with Disabilities (according to Commonwealth definition)

0 - $57,599      4   446     0.90

$57,600 to $73,299     1   138     0.72

$73,300 to $93,799     1   127     0.79

$93,800 to $118,399     1     48     2.08

$118,400 Plus      0   127          0

Total       7   886     0.79

1) Sick Leave Taken               7655.20   

2) Family Carer s Leave Taken            118.35   

3) Miscellaneous Special Leave                          488.91   

Leave Type                        2015/16   

Number of Employees born overseas   52                  161                      213                   24.04

Number of Employees who speak
language(s) other than English at home   

10                  37                      47                   5.30

   1         6       7                                       0.8

 

Name                                  Male               Female       Total  % of Agency

  Male                             Female         Total              % of Agency

Salary Bracket   Aboriginal Employees      Total Employees  % Aboriginal Employees

15 - 19                    0                    11                        11                     1.24

20 - 24                    3                    61                        64                     7.22

25 - 29                                                       18                  107                      125                   14.11

30 - 34                                                       17                    61                        78                     8.80

35 - 39                                                       23                    66                        89                   10.05

40 - 44                                                       14                    53                        67                     7.56

45 - 49                                                         9                    80                        89                   10.05

50 - 54                                                         7                    93                      100                   11.29

55 - 59                                                       23                  132                      155        17.49

60 - 64                                                       17                    73                        90        10.16

65+                                                         8                    10                        18                     2.03

Total                                                     139                  747                      886           100

Age Bracket              Male                 Female          Total              % of Total



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16 Page 35

Human Resources Statistics (cont.) 
Types of Disability (where specified)

Number of Employees using Voluntary Flexible Working Arrangements by Gender

Documented Review of Individual Performance Management

Disability Requiring Workplace Adaptation  1                5              6         0.7

Physical      0    0  0         0.0

Intellectual     0    0  0         0.0

Sensory      0    1  1         0.1

Psychological/Psychiatric    0    0  0         0.0

Disability                 Male             Female           Total           % of Agency

Purchased Leave     0      0             0

Flexitime                 8    11           19

Compressed Weeks    7    37           44

Part-time               75              508         583

Job Share     0      0             0

Working from Home    1      1             2

% Reviewed within the last 12 months     44.36

% review older than 12 months      41.08

% Not reviewed        14.56

Leave Type                 Male                        Female                      Total           

Documented Review of Individual 
Performance Management                             

Total  
         



SA Dental Service Yearbook 2015-16Page 36

Financial Statements
SA Dental Service Financial Report as at 30 June 2016

Revenue                                                      YTD Actuals $ 000   YTD Budget $ 000   YTD Variance $ 000
Patient/Client Fees                                (19,924)                          (21,406)                       (1,482)
Goods and Services Recharge/Recoveries       (294)                               (179)                            115
Recharges - Employee Related Cost                          (3)                                    0                                 3  
Commonwealth Grants                                                       (386)                               (363)                               23
Grants, Donations &amp; Subsidies        (100)                               (154)                            (54)
User Fees and Charges Revenue        (705)                               (951)                          (246)
Investment Income &amp; Other Revenue                                   (344)                               (334)                              10
Revenue Total                   (21,756)                         (23,387)                       (1,631)

   Expense
Employee Related Expenses      
Salaries and Wages - Nursing           360                                 441                             81
Salaries and Wages - Medical Officers                        957                                 920                            (37)
Salaries and Wages - Weekly Paid           442                                440                              (2)
Salaries and Wages - Clinical Academics            54                                    0                            (54)
Salaries and Wages - Salaried Employees                  44,222                            46,051                         1,829
AL, LSL and Revals for Leave and Oncosts                            5,714                              5,568                          (146)
Other Employee Related Expenses                     5,555                              5,584                              29
Employee Related Expenses Total                                57,304                            59,004                         1,700

Non Employee Related Expenses      
Agency Staffing              61                                   64                               3
Food Supplies              34                                   23                            (11)
Drug supplies            150                                   24                          (126)
Medical, Para Med &amp; Laboratory Supplies      4,161                              4,133                            (28)
Diagnostic Testing Charges                            3                                     5                                2
Housekeeping                      1,482                              1,338                          (144)
Linen Services                3                                   14                              11
Electricity, Gas, Fuel           466                                 573                            107
Minor Equipment                           23                                   81                              58
Repairs &amp; Maintenance           591                                 581                            (10)
Fee for Service                     12,572                            12,781                           209
Other Supplies &amp; Services        6,334                              5,954                          (380)
Patient/Client Transport Assistance                         19                                   22                                3 
S &amp; W Purchased Staff from Other SA Health Regions            0                                     0                                0
Other Expenses                           13                                      0                            (13)
Grants and Subsidies                                                              366                                 334                            (32)
Borrowing Expenses                                                                   0                                     0                                0

Non Employee Related Expenses Total    26,278                             25,927                          (351)

Expenses Total       83,582                             84,931                         1,349

Capital Revenue
Contributed Assets &amp; Services                                                    0                                     0                               0
Revaluation Increments Revenue                                                0                                     0                               0
Proceeds from Assets Disposals                                                  0                                     0                               0
Cost or Valuation of Assets Disposed                                     978                                     0                           (978)
Accum Depreciation of Assets Disposed                                (687)                                     0                           687
Fixed Asset Impairments                                                      5,480                                     0                       (5,480)
Appropriations and SA Government Revenue - Capital              0                                      0                               0

Capital Revenue Total                                                      5,771                                     0                       (5,771)

Capital Expenses
Financial and Investment Losses                                             267                                      0                         (267)
Depreciation &amp; Amortisation                                               3,614                                3,870                          256
Donated Assets Expense                                                            0                                       0                              0

Capital Expenses Total                                                      3,881                               3,870                          (11)

Grand Total                                                                     71,478                             65,414                       (6,064)

Grand Total                                                   77,663,547         77,935,406     271,859





For more information

SA Dental Service
GPO Box 864
Adelaide SA 5001
Telephone: 8222 8222
www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/sadental


</pre>
</body>
</html>