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HUMAN SERVICES AT
A GLANCE

EACH WEEK IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA IN 1997-98:

  1,295 women were screened for breast cancer
  2,500 children were immunised
  424 families or individuals received Financial Counselling and Support
  11,404 concessions were processed for transport, water rates, electricity and council rates 
  281 households applied for public housing
  111 households were allocated public housing 
  388 people renting in the private rental market received assistance with their weekly rent payments 
  398 people were given assistance to access housing in the private rental market with average bonds 

of $426
  $2.5 million in rental income was foregone providing rental subsidies for eligible tenants
  76 Alternative Care placements were made
  12,798 Home and Community Care services were provided
  8,471 Royal District Nursing Society Nurse visits were made
  5,698 people were counselled by a community health worker
  1,470 people donated blood
  300 calls were made to the Child Abuse Report Line 
  1,074 calls were received by Crisis Care
  362 babies were born
  8,739 people were treated in accident and emergency in public hospitals 
  27,852 services were provided at outpatient clinics
  6,263 people were admitted to public hospitals
  2,608 same-day admissions occurred in public hospitals
  $32,900,893 of State Government funding was spent on health, housing and community services 

and facilities.



Government
of South Australia

1998

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH COMMISSION

11-13 Hindmarsh Square
ADELAIDE  SA  5000

Tel:  08 8226 6599
Fax: 08 8226 6456



Acronyms and Abbreviations 4
Chief Executive s Report 5
Ministerial Portfolio Responsibilities 7
Boards and Committees 8

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT
Department of Human Services 10
Organisational Chart 13
Initiatives and Achievements 13

Community Wellbeing, Safety and Support 15
Personal Financial Assistance 18
Housing 20
Accommodation and Care 21
Community Care 24
Coordinated Care 27
Crisis and Acute Care 29
Policy, Ministerial Advice 31

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH COMMISSION ANNUAL REPORT
Roles and Responsibilities 34
Members of the Commission 35
Organisation Chart 36
Initiatives and Achievements 37

Community Wellbeing, Safety and Support 39
Personal Financial Assistance 42
Accommodation and Care 43
Community Care 45
Coordinated Care 47
Crisis and Acute Care 48
Policy, Ministerial Advice 51

CORPORATE ACTIVITIES OF DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES AND SOUTH
AUSTRALIAN HEALTH COMMISSION 
Corporate Support and Development 56
Fraud Detection 61
Contractual Arrangements 62
Account Payment Performance 63
Year 2000 Compliance 64
External Consultancies 68
Freedom of Information 71
Publications 73

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Financial Statements - Department of Human Services 78
Financial Statements - South Australian Health Commission 97
Financial Statements - Department of Housing and Urban Development 121
Financial Statements - Department for Family and Community Services 129

APPENDICES
Appendix 1 - Statistics 140
Appendix 2 - Special Program Funding 146

CONTENTS



AHU Aboriginal Housing Unit
DHS Department of Human Services 
DHUD Department of Housing and Urban Development
FACS Family and Community Services
FAYS Family and Youth Services
FOI Freedom of Information
HACC Home and Community Care
HIDC Health Industry Development Centre
ICU Intensive Care Unit
IDSC Intellectual Disability Services Council
IMVS Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science
ISIS Inpatients Separations Information System
ISAAC Integrated South Australian Activity Collection
IT Information Technology
JIS Justice Information System
MMSS Monthly Management Statistical System
MOU Memorandum of Understanding
OACIS Open Architecture Clinical Information System
OHS&amp;W Occupational health, safety and welfare
SAAP Supported Accommodation Assistance Program
SACHA South Australian Community Housing Authority
SAHC South Australian Health Commission
SAHT South Australian Housing Trust
SERCIS Social and Economic Risk Context Information System
STD Sexually Transmitted Disease
TQEH The Queen Elizabeth Hospital

4

ACRONYMS &amp;
ABBREVIATIONS



I have pleasure in submitting the first Annual
Report of the Department of Human Services
for the financial year 1997-98.  In addition,
pursuant to Section 26 of the South
Australian Health Commission Act 1976, the
Annual Report of the South Australian Health
Commission is incorporated in this report.  

The Department of Human Services was
formed in October 1997 as part of a general
public service restructure in South Australia.
The new department brings together into one
portfolio the Health Commission, the housing
activities of the former Housing and Urban
Development portfolio, and the Department
of Family and Community Services.  

Broadly, the Department of Human Services
aims to enhance the quality of life for South
Australians and to respond to those in need. It
does this through government and community
partnerships promoting health and wellbeing,
and the development of a sustainable
community and quality living standards.

In measuring whether these aims are being
met, it is important to understand what is
being delivered given the available resources.
This is being achieved across Government
through the change from the previous
program-based budgeting to an output-based
approach, supported by accrual accounting,
which gives a better indication of the real
cost of providing services to the community.  

The new approach will provide greater
accountability, transparency and choice in
service delivery.  This year has been a
transition year for the Department of Human
Services in changing from inputs to output
classes and further work will continue in
1998-99.

The human services environment involves
significant challenges.  These include
increasing pressure on services caused by an
ageing population; improvements in medical
technology and increasing community
expectations; and continuing poverty,
especially for single parents, younger single
people and families with children.  

In positioning itself to address these
challenges, the Department of Human
Services will build on the inter-relationships
among health, housing and community
services to support planning and service
provision.  It will also assist the Minister in
providing the strong voice that South
Australia needs in Commonwealth/State
negotiations on health care, community
services and housing.

In human services it is essential to ensure that
planning is driven by needs rather than solely
by budget imperatives or by institutional
arrangement.  The new arrangements will
offer opportunities to respond more
effectively to community needs which are
complex and diverse.

We aim to take a more holistic approach to
policy making while ensuring appropriate
service standards and to ensure adequate
health and physical protection.  It will focus
on preventing illness and promoting health,
wellbeing and vital communities by
developing partnerships among government,
service providers and the community to meet
the needs of all South Australians.  The
Department will work with communities to
build on their strengths and support their
endeavours. 

5

CHIEF EXECUTIVE S
REPORT

To: The Honourable, 
The Minister for Human Services,
The Minister for Disability Services, 
The Minister for the Ageing



An important aspect of the organisation is the
separate operational focus on metropolitan
and country communities, as well as on
issues of statewide significance. 

Human Services will have a continued focus
on ageing, mental health, disability, families
and children, and Aboriginal people.  It will
provide high level accountability for key
issues such as public health, financial
management, business services, and capital
and asset management.

One of the driving forces in creating the new
department is to provide seamless services to
remove the need for people to navigate
numerous service boundaries, referrals and
assessments.  

The achievement of portfolio outcomes in
Human Services requires that the decisions
on priorities and resources allocation are
informed by the people providing and
accessing services.

While the new structural arrangements are
still evolving, the department has begun a
number of across-portfolio initiatives.
Regional managers from the previous health,
housing and community services areas are
exploring the delivery of human services
responses at the local provider level.  In both
metropolitan and country areas, work has
begun on assessing needs and common goals.  

I am confident that the new arrangements will
enable us to maintain South Australia s
position at the forefront of human services
well into the 21st century.  

Christine Charles
CHIEF EXECUTIVE
30 June 1998

6



Adoption Act 1988
Aged Citizens Clubs (Subsidies) Act 1963
Blood Contaminants Act 1985
Children s Protection Act 1993
Chiropodists Act 1950
Chiropractors Act 1991
Commonwealth and State Housing
Agreement Act 1945
Commonwealth and State Housing
Supplemental Agreement Act 1954
Consent to Medical Treatment and Palliative
Care Act 1995
Controlled Substances Act 1984
Dentists Act 1984
Disability Services Act 1993
Drugs Act 1908
Family and Community Services Act 1972
Food Act 1985
Guardianship and Administration Act 1993
Housing and Urban Development
(Administrative Arrangements) Act 1995
Housing Agreement Act 1991
Housing Improvement Act 1940
Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science
Act 1982

Hospitals Act 1934
Medical Practitioners Act 1983
Mental Health Act 1993
Nurses Act 1984
Occupational Therapists Act 1974
Office for the Ageing Act 1985
Optometrists Act 1920
Pharmacists Act 1991
Physiotherapists Act 1991
Psychological Practices Act 1974
Public and Environmental Health Act 1987
Public Charities Funds Act 1935
Public Intoxication Act 1984
Radiation Protection and Control Act 1982
Reproductive Technology Act 1988
South Australian Co-operative and
Community Housing Act 1991
South Australian Health Commission Act
1976
South Australian Housing Trust Act 1995
Supported Residential Facilities Act 1992
Transplantation and Anatomy Act 1983

Young Offenders Act 1993

7

MINISTERIAL 
PORTFOLIO 
RESPONSIBILITIES
LEGISLATION COMMITTED TO THE
MINISTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES,
MINISTER FOR DISABILITY 
SERVICES, MINISTER FOR THE
AGEING



Advisory Board on Ageing
Charitable and Social Welfare Fund Board
Children s Interests Bureau
Children s Protection Advisory Panel
Chiropody Board of South Australia 
Chiropractors Board of South Australia 
Clinical Dental Technicians  Registration
Committee
Commissioners of Charitable Funds
Controlled Substances Advisory Council
Dental Board of South Australia 
Dental Professional Conduct Tribunal
Grants for Seniors Advisory Committee
Guardianship Board
Home and Community Care Ministerial
Advisory Committee
HomeStart Finance Board
Housing Advisory Council Community
Committee
Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science
Council 
Medical Board of South Australia
Medical Practitioners Professional Conduct
Tribunal
Nurses Board of South Australia 
Occupational Therapists Registration Board
of South Australia
Optical Dispensers Registration Committee
Optometrists Board
Pharmacy Board of South Australia 
Physiotherapists Board of South Australia

Public and Environmental Health Council
Public Housing Appeal Panel
Radiation Protection Committee
South Australian Community Housing
Authority Board
South Australian Council on Reproductive
Technology

South Australian Health Commission
South Australian Housing Trust
South Australian Psychological Board
South Australian Sports Promotion, Cultural
and Health Advancement Trust (Living
Health)
Supported Residential Facilities Advisory
Committee

8

BOARDS AND 
COMMITTEES



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

9

DEPARTMENT OF
HUMAN SERVICES

Annual Report
1997-98



The Department of Human Services was
formed in October 1997, as part of a general
public service restructure in South Australia.
Human Services became one of ten
departments designed to create a more
coordinated and streamlined public service.
Underlying the public service restructure are
principles of better service and more efficient
and effective government.  

The department brings together the South
Australian Health Commission, the former
Department of Family and Community
Services, the housing activities of the former
Department of Housing and Urban
Development, the South Australian Housing
Trust, the South Australian Community
Housing Authority, HomeStart Finance and
the Institute of Medical and Veterinary
Science.  

The department is responsible for policy
administration and operations of public
health, hospitals, family and community
services, disability services, ageing and
housing.  The combined budget of the
portfolio amounts to approximately 40% of
the State s annual expenditure and it employs
about 23 200 staff.  Its structure includes a
central office with strong links to a number of
service providers.  

Central Office
Central office of the Department of Human
Services has the following roles and
responsibilities:
  to ensure that publicly funded human 

services are strategically planned and 
developed, appropriately resourced and 
work harmoniously and effectively with
in whole of government policies and 
administrative requirements;

  to be accountable within government for
the overall performance of the publicly 
funded South Australian human services
system;

  to provide high level support to the 
Minister for Human Services, Minister 
for the Ageing and Disability Services 
and the Chief Executive of the 
Department of Human Services;

  to allocate funds to providers of human 
services and programs on a properly 
planned and considered basis taking 
account of population requirements, 
government policy, defined outcomes 
and the availability of resources;

  to provide support, as appropriate and 
necessary to enable the efficient and 
effective provision of high quality 
human services and programs within 
available resources.  

10

DEPARTMENT OF
HUMAN SERVICES



11

Central Office comprises six divisions:

Aboriginal Services - which is responsible
for the overall coordination and management
of support services, including effective
funding procurement processes, and the
provision of innovative, consultative and
collaborative decision making processes, to
contribute to the health and wellbeing of the
Aboriginal community.

Strategic Planning and Policy - the role of
which is:
  to develop and maintain the          

department s strategic planning and   
policy framework with a key focus on 
population groups, key human services 
issues, prevention, interagency        
cooperation and consumer involvement;

  to develop strategic directions and plans 
based on this framework, including 
across Government, sociodemographic 
trend analysis, health, housing and     
welfare modelling;

  The division also manages inter-      
government relations, provides executive
support for the Minister and the Chief 
Executive and provides legal services to 
the department.  

Strategic Finance and Corporate Services -
is responsible for the strategic management of
finance and budgets, capital and asset
management, information management and
corporate services across the human services
department.  

Corporate services covers human resources,
internal audit, industrial relations, risk
management, insurance, administrative
services, library services and public affairs.  

Country and Metropolitan divisions -
are responsible for service planning and
coordination, purchasing, monitoring and
evaluation of efficiency and effectiveness of
services, business improvement management
development and support among providers
within a defined geographic area.

This will enable:
  specific program design and              

procurement which is best suited to the 
needs of populations within a            
corporately developed high level out
comes framework;

  a closer focus on service delivery to 
observe and gather feedback on        
successful initiatives and areas requiring
improvement;

  promotion and cultivation of         
opportunities for providers to deliver 
service improvements and to form          
integrated service networks;

  accountability for the resources allocated
and to meet particular needs in relation 
to population outcome improvements in 
their areas.

In addition to specific regional work, each
division takes a lead role in specific program
development, including the Supported
Accommodation Assistance Program State
Plan. The Disability Services Office and the
Office of the Ageing are included in this area. 

Statewide Division - is responsible for
services planning and coordination,
purchasing, monitoring/evaluation of
efficiency and  effectiveness of services,
management development and support for the
eight largest public hospitals.  These represent
$720 million of the portfolio budget and
include Flinders Medical Centre and The
Queen Elizabeth, Lyell McEwin, Royal
Adelaide, Women s and Children s, Modbury,
Noarlunga and Repatriation General hospitals.

The division also comprises Population
Outcomes (including Population Health and
Coordinated Care), and Public and
Environmental Health.  The Statewide
Division will provide a number of services
across the department, such as costing and
evaluation, industry and export development
and review of contestability and outsourcing
options.

Service Providers

Human services has a comprehensive service
provider arm, which includes the following
entities:

  The South Australian Housing Trust
which provides public housing to 
approximately 55,000 households.  
Assistance is also  provided for people 
in need who are renting in the private 
rental market, through the provision of 
bond guarantees and rent relief payment.  



  The South Australian Community 
Housing Authority which provides 
housing capital to community housing 
associations and housing cooperatives 
which provide accommodation for 
groups on low incomes or with other 
special needs.  

  HomeStart which provides home    
ownership assistance to low income 
families and households who often  
experience difficulties in purchasing 
their own homes.  

  Family and Youth Services which   
provides child protection, alternative 
care and juvenile justice services as 
required by statute, as well as meeting 
the needs of vulnerable young people.  

  Hospitals: major public hospitals in the 
metropolitan area and many hospitals 
throughout the State.  

  Health units and community health 
centres: a regional network of health 
services at the community level, cover
ing rural and metropolitan areas,   
including specific Aboriginal health   
services.  

  South Australian Dental Service which
provides preventative dental care

programs for young people in schools, 
and also provides dental care for low 
income families and older people.  

  Institute of Medical and Veterinary 
Science which provides pathology     
services across the State of South 
Australia.  

Local area planning is taking place to
determine the best configuration for regional
service provision and management.  

Restructuring
Amalgamating human services provides
opportunities for improved service provision
and reduced infrastructure costs with a
renewed commitment to identify and respond
to the community s needs.  The creation of a
new structure in which this could be achieved
included establishing a central office which
draws together the three streams of the
portfolio - health, housing and family and
community services, and linked them with a
range of service providers.  This has been
achieved by a planning process that began
with the establishment of the Department of
Human Services in October 1997  and
continues through a strategic policy
framework. 

12



13

SA Health Commission

Country

Metropolitan

Statewide

Internal Audit

Strategic Finance and
Corporate Services

Aboriginal Services

Strategic Planning and
Policy

ORGANISATION CHART

HomeStart South Australian Community Housing
Authority

South Australian 
Housing Trust

Health Units

Non-Government funded
Services

Family and Youth Services

Chief Executive

Service Providers

INITIATIVES AND
ACHIEVEMENTS
The Department of Human Services has been
formed in a climate of changing socio-
economic trends that establish key challenges
for human services including:
  ageing of the population - 14 per cent of

South Australians will be over the age 
of 65 by the turn of the century       
compared to 12 per cent nationally;

  the increasing life expectancy over the 
last 30 years particularly among the 
older age groups contrasted with the 
continuing lower life expectancy and 

higher disease prevalence patterns for 
Aboriginal people;

  the changing poverty demographic with 
single parents (21 per cent), younger 
single persons (19 percent) and families 
with children (12 per cent) experiencing
the highest rates.

All of these factors serve to increase the
demand on services, including aged care,
disability, mental health, housing and
community support services.  The department

MINISTER



responds to these imperatives by focussing
assistance on those in need, and by applying
the principles of prevention, promotion of
health and wellbeing, and early intervention
to maximise long term benefits to the
community whilst making more effective use
of the community s resources.    

Outcomes and Outputs
The outcomes for the Department were
developed to take account of key roles:
  human services working in partnership 

to contribute to quality of life goals for 
the community;

  human services responding to the formal
care and accommodation of people and 
to ensure that services are delivered to 
meet those needs;

  human services  role in innovation and 
in responding to Government policy.

Outputs reflect the objectives and priorities of
government in delivering its products and
services to the community.  The outputs
nominated for the Department of Human
Services reflect the strategic directions of
government for delivering human services to
the community and form a continuum of care
from the more preventive, self-management
focus of community wellbeing, safety and
support at one end to the more interventional,
obligatory focus of crisis and acute care at the
other.  
The outputs are: 
  Community Wellbeing, Safety and     

Support; 
  Personal Financial Assistance; 
  Housing; 
  Accommodation and Care; 
  Community Care; 
  Coordinated Care; 
  Crisis and Acute Care;  
  Policy, Ministerial Advice.

14

Note: This table presents the indicative costs of the department s outputs as presented
throughout the Annual Report.  The table was included in the department s annual Estimates
presentation to Parliament as a part of the Treasury White Papers Estimates.
The information has been prepared on the basis of estimates of the portfolio s consolidated
economic entity and therefore differs substantially from the audited financial information
presented at the rear of the annual reports for the Health Commission s  Chief Entity  and the
Department of Human Services.
Due to the eliminations necessary in compiling the consolidated figures, the sum of individual
entity reports will not agree to the consolidated total.

In the following pages, the Department of Human Services  initiatives and achievements are
listed under the relevant outputs.

OPERATING EXPENSES 1997-98 %
$ M

Community Wellbeing, Safety and Support 61 2%

Personal Financial Assistance 490 20%

Housing Support 105 4%

Accommodation and Care 205 8%

Community Care 333 13%

Coordinated Care 40 2%

Crisis and Acute Care 1222 50%

Policy, Ministerial Advice 15 1%

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 2471 100%



Assistance for Families
Parenting SA attracted an extra four years of
funding from the South Australian
Government s Community Development
Fund and a further $240,000 from the
Commonwealth Government to help improve
and support parenting.

Over three million Parent Easy Guides (tip
sheets for parents on 48 different parenting
topics) were distributed.  These guides are
available from 700 commercial, government
and community services throughout the State.
Information and other supports are also
available on the Internet which had almost
261,000  hits  (www.parenting.sa.gov.au).
Financial support was provided to develop the
expertise of the Child and Youth Health s
Parent Helpline in dealing with teenage
issues.  The Helpline is promoted as the first
point of access to government services which
provide parenting support. It receives over
100 000 calls per year.

Grants to the value of $73,206 were made to
96 community groups to help provide
parenting support at a local level.  Priority
was given to groups providing services to
rural or disadvantaged communities,
Aboriginal   people, sole parents and fathers.

The Southern Home Visiting Program,
funded by the Commonwealth Government,
was launched in the Noarlunga area.
Managed by the Adelaide Central Mission,
this program assists parents to develop
parenting skills.

The Office for Families and Children recently
updated and reprinted the booklets: When
Can I? and When Mum and Dad Split Up.
Protocols on assisting pregnant women with a
mental illness and a charter for children and
young people in care were developed and
implemented.  A study of the economic cost
of child abuse and neglect in South Australia
was undertaken.  

15

COMMUNITY 
WELLBEING, 
SAFETY AND SUPPORT

This covers outputs that have an impact at
the population level, promote health and
wellbeing and regulate environmental and
living standards.  These outputs promote the
caring role of families and communities and
have a community development focus.
These outputs seek to meet the government s
objectives of prevention, health promotion
and early intervention.  Programs which
focus on achieving these outputs include
Parenting SA, the Violence Intervention
Project, the provision of community
development grants to organisations and
community groups and monitoring and
securing public health in areas such as food
safety and water quality.
Programs which focus on achieving these
outputs include screening services such as
Pap smears and breast xrays, immunisation
programs and domestic violence programs.
Funding support is provided for a range of
non-government organisations, Aboriginal
community controlled health services, the
Guardianship Board and other advocacy
programs.

Expenditure for community wellbeing, safety
and support is $61 million which represents
2% of the budget.



16

Neighbourhood and Community
Development
In 1997-98 the Neighbourhood and
Community Development Program supported
29 metropolitan and nine rural services in
providing a range of services to promote the
welfare of individuals and families,
particularly those who were most
disadvantaged.  These included community
based neighbourhood houses, community
development projects and other specialist
services such as women s centres, which are
involved in facilitating self-help groups,
community activities, adult education
programs and provision of information about
community services to local communities.

In 1997-98 total funding for the
Neighbourhood and Community
Development Program was $1,029,400.
Programs for Older People
The Grants for Seniors Program assists
voluntary agencies, community organisations
and self-help groups to remain active in their
communities through the provision of small
one-off grants.  In 1997-98, 305 grants
totalling $197,000 were approved.
In 1997-98 the Office for the Ageing Grants
Program provided support for innovative
projects directed towards extending older
people s involvement in their communities.
The grants were for one-off funding for
amounts not exceeding $20,000.  A total of
$300,000 was provided to a range of projects.
The administration of the Seniors Card for
over 197,000 South Australian card holders
who receive concessions and discounts for a
broad range of goods and services was further
streamlined.  

Aboriginal Health
$1 million has been allocated to projects
under the Aboriginal Health Partnership.
These include:
  $511,781 for Aboriginal community 

controlled health services;
  $393,254 for mainstream organisations 

to increase numbers of Aboriginal 
health workers;

  $48,680 for health promotion activities 
by Aboriginal health workers working 
in mainstream organisations in the areas
of diabetes, substance misuse and sexual
health;

  $46,290 for upgrading the facilities at 
Point Pearce and Maitland.

Industry Support and Development
During 1997-98 funding of $512,500 was
distributed through the Industry Support and
Development sub program to five peak bodies
and one other organisation to advise on
family and community service plans and
policies, and to assist community service
agencies to improve their management
practices and coordination of services.  The
specific areas of assistance provided included
support with strategic planning, evaluation
techniques,  personnel management and
consumer participation.

Food Safety
A large number of cases of food poisoning
from Salmonella Oranienberg were
investigated.  Production processes were
reviewed and altered at the source and action
taken to ensure the safety of raw materials
used in manufacturing.  Following the
identification and elimination of the probable
source, no further cases were reported.

Domestic Violence
The Domestic Violence Unit coordinates
projects funded from the Prime Minister s
Domestic Violence Summit.  These include:
community consultation and needs
assessment; resources developed for
Aboriginal and multicultural communities;
development of competency based standards
and training packages; and peer education for
young people at risk.



A Violence Intervention Project is being
trialled in the northern suburbs, coordinating
the services of a range of key agencies to
assist families appearing before the Elizabeth
Domestic Violence Court.  The positive out-
comes of the trial were highlighted by an
independent evaluation.

Health Promotion
Primary health care grants worth $1.5 million
for health promotion projects were announced
on 2 June 1998.  Priority areas are mental
health, diabetes education, Aboriginal health,
maternal and child health, immunisation and
violence and abuse.

Immunisation
The Commonwealth Government provided
$745,000 towards a measles vaccination
program to vaccinate all primary school
children in the third term of 1998.
$1.87 million on State funding was allocated
to provide free influenza vaccine to people
over 70 years old.

Screening
BreastScreen SA completed its 300,000th
mammogram screening in February 1998 and
announced a $1 million expansion.  The
funding assisted in purchasing additional
mammography units, expansion of the Marion
Clinic and provision of mobile screening. 

Private Rental Accommodation
Standards

These standards are regulated by the South
Australian Housing Trust under the Housing
Improvement Act 1940 to ensure that
minimum standards of accommodation are
maintained in the private rental market.  In
1997-98 approximately 144 notices of
intention to declare houses sub-standard were
issued and some 91 rents fixed.

17



Utility and Transport Concessions
Concessions for water rates, council rates,
electricity and transport are provided to
alleviate financial pressures experienced by
pensioners, beneficiaries and low income
earners.  SA Water and ETSA processed
185,000 and 205,000 applications
respectively for concessions.  145,000
applications were processed for concessions
in council rates.  58,000 beneficiaries and low
income earners also received transport
concession cards.  This year there was an
increase in demand for utility concessions
of 6.8%.  

The State Concession Card Scheme is
administered by the Department of Human
Services.  Cards are issued to unemployed
males over the age of 60 who have been
receiving Centrelink administered benefits for
less than 12 months and who do not qualify
for a Pensioner Concession Card; dependant

spouses in receipt of the card prior to the
Commonwealth extension of the Pensioner
Concession Card in April 1993; and war
widows under the age of 60, subject to an
income test.

In the past year, 151 State Concession Cards
were issued compared to 51 in the previous
year.  The increase came from the broadening
of eligibility criteria to include skilled
migrants who did not qualify for
Commonwealth income supports but whose
income and assets were within the allowable
limits.

Private Rental Assistance 

The South Australian Housing Trust helps
people on low incomes to access and
maintain accommodation in the private rental
market.  Financial assistance is provided in
the form of weekly rent relief payments, bond
guarantees, and assistance with rent payments
in advance or arrears.  In 1997-98, the Trust
assisted approximately 20,000 people with
bond guarantees and rent in advance or
arrears, and a further 20,000 with rent relief
payments.  Program details are contained in
the Trust s Annual Report.

South Australian Spectacles Scheme

The South Australian Spectacles Scheme
assists eligible people to obtain basic optical
appliances at reduced cost.  Eligibility is
restricted to residents of South Australia who
hold either a Pensioner Concession Card or
who have held a Health Care Card for at least
12 months.  In 1997-98, approximately
74,000 people were assisted at a cost of
$1,441,200.

18

PERSONAL FINANCIAL
ASSISTANCE

This covers outputs that contribute to
quality of life by providing financial support
to help people afford housing, local
government rates and appropriate health
services.  

This assistance is targeted to people who
are financially disadvantaged.  It provides
for concessions on electricity and water
bills, rental subsidies and outpatient
prescriptions.  It makes it easier for country
people to afford transport to the city for
treatment not provided in their locality.

Expenditure on personal financial
assistance is $490 million which represents
20% of the budget.



Patient Assistance Transport Scheme

The Patient Assistance Transport Scheme
assists rural patients with the cost of travel
and accommodation when they are required to
travel over 200 kilometres (or from Kangaroo
Island to the mainland) to receive medical
specialist treatment that is not available at a
nearer centre.  In 1997-98, approximately
17,000 people were assisted at a cost of
$2,058,400.

Pharmaceuticals

Pharmaceuticals are provided at a reduced
cost to Commonwealth Health Care Card
holders accessing public hospital outpatient
services.  General patients pay a fee of $15
per item while those eligible for the
concessional rate pay $3.20 up to the Safety
Net Threshold specified under the
Pharmaceutical Benefits Safety Net Scheme,
after which pharmaceuticals are provided free.  

It is not possible to estimate the total number
of concessional recipients or expenditure.  A
survey of three metropolitan public hospitals
undertaken in 1998, suggests that expenditure
on concessional pharmaceuticals could be in
the range of $1 million for the State.  

Funerals Assistance

The Funerals Assistance Program continued
to provide dignified funerals for people who
died in financially disadvantaged
circumstances.  Assistance was also provided
to the immediate relatives of deceased persons
who were not able to pay for the funeral of a
family member.

In 1997-98, the department provided financial
assistance to or arranged more than 500
funerals at a cost of $491,535.  This
represents a 9.7% increase from the preceding
year.  Contributions towards these funeral
costs of $81,045 were realised, from
recipients of funeral assistance.

19



Public Rental Housing
Public rental housing is provided by the South
Australian Housing Trust through its 15
regional offices.  In 1997-98, the Trust
managed approximately 58,000 public
housing dwellings, allocated housing to 5,773
new tenants including some 1,500 priority
housing allocations for people with urgent
housing need.  Assistance is given to those on
low income through rental rebates, and in
1997-98 over 82.9% of all Trust public
housing tenants paid a reduced rent based on
their income and other factors.  Program
details are in the Trust s annual report.

Rural and Remote Housing 
Rural and Remote Housing is made available
for Aboriginal communities through the Rural
and Remote Housing Program and is
administered by the Aboriginal Housing Unit
(AHU) of the South Australian Housing
Trust.  This program provides housing
funding and construction management for the

Aboriginal Lands and Remote Areas.
Decisions are made through direct
negotiations with the communities and the
relevant Aboriginal organisations.  Ownership
and management of the houses are vested in
the community.  At 30 June 1998, there were
582 properties provided through this program.
Further details are in the Trust s annual
report.

Home Purchase for Low Income Earners
Housing finance is provided by HomeStart
Finance to assist low and moderate income
earners into home ownership.  HomeStart
Finance products include the HomeStart Loan
which is a low start home loan, with
repayments linked to income and inflation
rather than interest rates; the Advantage Loan,
which is an additional loan with an interest
rebate period of five years, for those who
have the maximum HomeStart loan for which
they are eligible and with gross incomes less
than $500 per week; and the Seniors Loan
designed for persons over 55 years of age
who already own a home.  In 1997-98, new
settlements consisted of 2163 HomeStart
Loans, including 760 Advantage Loans, plus
204 Seniors Loans, with a total value of
$139.4 million.  Details of HomeStart
Finance s activities are contained in its annual
report.

Community Housing
Community housing is managed by
community housing associations and housing
cooperatives, which are administered and
regulated by the South Australian Community
Housing Authority (SACHA).  Community
housing provides different housing options for
low income and special needs groups.  At 30
June 1998, there were 92 housing
cooperatives and 32 community housing
associations managing 2535 dwellings.
SACHA is a statutory body within the
Department of Human Services and details of
its activities are contained in its annual report.  

20

HOUSING

This covers a range of outputs that assist
those in need to access appropriate and
affordable accommodation.  Support is
provided to facilitate either purchasing or
renting a home, and opportunity is offered
for community participation in housing
management.  

South Australia has the highest proportion
per capita of public housing of any state.
The challenge is to target public housing to
those in greatest need.  It is estimated that
of all Trust tenants, less than 10% are
eligible families with low incomes.  A large
proportion are single people and couples.
Over a third of the houses are more than 30
years old, so a program of urban renewal
has been implemented.

Expenditure on housing outputs is $105
million which represents 4% of the budget.



Supported Tenancies

Under the Supported Tenancy Scheme, the
South Australian Housing Trust leases
residential accommodation to agencies that
provide support services to people with
special needs.  For example, the program
provides shelter for women, young people or
families, specific youth housing and housing
for those with a physical or intellectual
disability.  In 1997-98, the Trust leased
approximately 709 properties to 127
agencies.  Details of this program are
contained in the Trust s annual report.

Supported Accommodation 

During 1997-98, seven metropolitan and
seven rural services were funded by the
Supported Accommodation Assistance
Program (SAAP) to provide services to
families with children who were homeless or
were at imminent risk of becoming homeless.
Total State and Commonwealth funding to
these agencies in 1997-98 was $2,500,800.
In 1997-98 a total of $3,113,690 was
allocated to nine services for homeless single
adults, meal services, day centres and crisis
and medium term accommodation services
across the State.

One-off funds of $100,000 were made
available for developing and piloting a
service for residents of boarding houses
which aims to prevent people from becoming
homeless.  This will assist residents with
complex problems who have traditionally
been unable to access case management
support from existing mainstream services.

Seventeen youth services were funded across
South Australia under SAAP to meet the

21

ACCOMMODATION
AND CARE

This covers outputs that provide
accommodation and integrated care options
for individuals and families who, for
reasons of vulnerability, dislocation or
disability, cannot live unassisted in a
normal community setting.

The changing context for human services
needs to encompass a number of socio-
economic demographic trends, which
include the ageing of the population - 14
per cent of South Australians will be over
the age of 65 by the turn of the century,
compared to 12 per cent nationally - and
increasing life expectancy for most of the
population, contrasted with continuing
lower life expectancy for Aboriginal people.
There are also high rates of poverty,
especially for single parents, younger single
people and families with children.
Accommodation and care programs include
the supported tenancy scheme, nursing
homes and hostels, support for homeless
individuals and families and
accommodation for people with a physical
disability or impaired mental health that
prevents them from managing in the
community setting. Older South Australians
and their families need to feel that
accommodation and care programs will be
there to support them if they become too
frail to manage in the community.
Expenditure on accommodation and care is
$205 million which represents 8% of the
budget.



needs of young homeless people in crisis and
to assist them in becoming independent
($8,775,540).
In addition to these core services, there are a
number of other specific projects:
  research is being conducted into the 

most appropriate service delivery model 
for young homeless people in the 
Riverland region;

  a pilot training program focusing on 
improving policies and practices in  
dealing with challenging behaviours in 
SAAP youth services was conducted;

  further work was carried out in refining 
the assessment and referral process for 
youth services;

  a performance measurement trial was 
implemented across all metropolitan  
services identifying the progress young 
people have made in achieving their 
goals in the services.

In 1997-98, $5,033,996 was distributed by
SAAP to 17 domestic violence services across
the State.  The Implementation Plan It s My
Choice, A focus on Women and Children was
launched in August 1997.  As a result of the
reforms, resources will be redistributed across
the State to create new services in Ceduna
and Coober Pedy, and to extend services in
the Murraylands and Port Pirie regions.
Because women with children require a range
of accommodation options, significant funds
were committed for furnishing additional safe
and secure transitional houses.  

Specific funding was provided for case
management training during 1997-98 with
additional funds also being acquired through
one-off and reform funding to enable
organisations to participate in training for
mandated notifiers, substance abuse, and
occupational health, safety and welfare
training.

A National Indigenous Case Management
Project was also undertaken which culminated
in the production of a culturally appropriate
Aboriginal case management resources guide
which will be distributed to indigenous
agencies.

An external evaluation of SAAP Mark III was
undertaken during 1997-98 and its findings

will be released in 1998.  The evaluation
focused on how improvements can be made to
open access to services and exit opportunities
for ex-residents, and how the SAAP can
respond to the increasing complexity of social
and health needs of homeless people.

Secure Care
South Australia continues to participate in
developing service standards in secure care by
the National Working Party on Standards and
Accreditation.  

The average daily occupancy figures for
1997-98 decreased from 94 to 76, a 19%
decrease from the 1996-97 financial year.
There were 197 fewer admissions compared
to 1996-97.  First Instance Warrants increased
from 218 to 232.  The decrease in average
daily occupancy coincides with the decrease
of average length of stay.  1996-97 saw 21.6
days per custody compared to 19.8 days per
custody for the 1997-98 financial year,
equating to a drop of 8.33%.  

As a result of changes in methods used to
calculate average daily occupancy, the figures
presented are generally lower than before.
However, detentions have noticeably dropped
in numbers from 57.24 for 1996-97, to 38.46
for the 1997-98 financial year.  An ongoing
issue for secure care is the over-representation
of Aboriginal young people, particularly
young women.

Cavan Training Centre is a detention centre
for young male offenders primarily between
the ages of 16 and 18 years.  The major
emphasis at Cavan is rehabilitation, by
encouraging participation by residents in a
range of social, educational, vocational,
personal development and restorative
programs.  Major activities included
participation in  Trees for Life ; work with
the police on  Blue Light  camps at Millicent
and Iron Knob; assisting disabled persons by
doing yard work at their homes; and
developing a program with the Salisbury
Council to maintain a BMX track at
Salisbury.

Magill Training Centre provides a secure
environment for younger male youths and all
young women admitted on Warrants and
Policy Custody, Remand or Detention
mandates for the State of South Australia.

22



Major activities were:
  implementation of a joint agreement 

with Child and Youth Health (The 
Second Story) resulting in a greatly 
improved confidential health and      
medical service for young people at the 
training centre which will continue to 
support them when they are released 
back into the community;

  development of the Magill Outreach 
Program which significantly helped 
reduce the number of young people 
detained in secure care.

Disability Services

The Disability Services Office, in conjunction
with the Intellectual Disability Services
Council, identified a range of strategies for
the redevelopment of Strathmont Centre.
They include an aged care facility, relocating
some clients to community accommodation
and refurbishing facilities for the remaining
residents.

South Australia, Western Australia and the
Northern Territory jointly funded the
Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara
(NPY) Women s Council Aboriginal
Corporation Allied Health Project to support
people with a disability from Aboriginal
communities in the cross border districts.

Community Residential Care

Community Residential Care provides care in
six residential units for young people who
cannot live with their families and who cannot
be fostered.  

The 12 bed purpose-built Regency Park
Community Unit was opened, replacing the
North Adelaide Community Unit.  This unit
can be divided into three discrete areas and
has been set up to provide the young men
with a range of supervision levels, assisting
them to make the transition to independent
living when appropriate.

An extensive range of programs for young
people was offered through the Behaviour
Intervention Service which aims to provide
high quality residential services to extremely
disadvantaged young people with multiple
problems and behaviour disorders, including
mental health issues.  These services included

sex education, boys talk, grief and loss,
independent living skills, drug and alcohol
education, self-esteem building, young
women s health and anger management.

Community Residential Care also sponsored a
forum aimed at establishing best practice
standards for young women in residential
care.  

Aged Care

Country aged care facilities were upgraded at
the Hawker Great Northern War Memorial
Hospital ($460,000), the Hills Mallee
Southern region ($3,900,000) and as part of
the Kangaroo Island Hospital Redevelopment
($2,800,000).
Hospitals Development

A $6.8 million upgrading of Hampstead
Centre was announced, as part of Stage 1 of
Royal Adelaide Hospital redevelopment.  This
will strengthen the links and coordination of
rehabilitation, domiciliary and community
based care to provide a more efficient service
to families and the community.

The new $21.4 million Port Augusta Hospital
opened in December 1997.  This was
facilitated through a private finance leaseback
arrangement.

Palliative Care

After consultation with services and
consumers, the Strategic Plan for Palliative
Care Services in SA was developed.  The plan
recognises that palliative care is a specialty
service requiring improved coordination and
integration, and describes the best practice
model under which palliative care services
will be purchased in the future.

23



Community Care 

$70.4 million was available for Home and
Community Care (HACC) services in 1997-
98, an increase of 4% from the previous year.
This allowed for 2% indexation totalling $1.4
million and the remaining $1.3 million for
service growth.  $1.5 million was made
available for distribution to new or expanded
recurrent services and $1.352 million was
recommended for one-off projects.  In
addition, $1.48 million was made available

for the Carers Strategy and a further $1.464
million for one-off projects as a result of
surplus funds from previous years.

Funding approved for this year was used to
address the priorities in the 1996-97 HACC
Annual Plan.  These were:
  flexible and coordinated services, 

including collaborative regional projects;
  geographical priorities based on regional

inequities;
  carer support;
  community transport networks;
  extension of pilot projects;
  special needs groups, particularly 

Aboriginal and non English speaking 
background.

Family Support and Development

During 1997-98 a total of 34 metropolitan and
22 country family development services were
funded to provide parent education,
counselling services for parents and
adolescents, and family support services
including specialist services for Aboriginal
and non-English speaking families.  The focus
of these services is preventative rather than
crisis intervention, and funding for these 56
services in 1997-98 was $3,060,873.
Payments for 1000 trust maintenance
accounts totalling $1.039 million were
received.  This work was taken over by the
Child Support Agency for parents who
separated after October 1989, reducing the
total number of active cases from 490 in June
1997 to 400 in June 1998.

Vulnerable Youth: Funding to Non-
government Agencies

The Department of Human Services 
commitment to the development of
indigenous youth saw the continuation of
support and funding of $62,000 from the

24

COMMUNITY CARE

This covers outputs that enable individuals
and families to function in the community
setting. It includes Home and Community
Care programs for older South Australians,
family support services and programs to
support vulnerable youth.   

Many of the people who need this support
are older South Australians, who will
comprise 14% of the population by the year
2000.  They are choosing home based care
services rather than nursing homes.
Support is also provided through
Domiciliary Care and RDNS, community
health centres, help for those with gambling
problems and financial counselling services.
Options Coordination supports those with
disabilities that are able to live
independently or with their families in the
community, recognising the caring roles of
families and carers.  Community teams
provide support to those with mental illness
and their families to enable them to live in
the community.

In 1997-98 a number of programs were
established to support continuing education
of doctors and to attract general practi-
tioners to country areas.  

Expenditure on community care is $333
million which represents 13% of the budget.



Family and Community Development
Program during 1997-98 to 20 Aboriginal
Youth Action Committees across the State.
The long term vision of the  program is to
encourage young people to take up
responsible roles on community councils and
other organisations.

Twelve services for vulnerable youth were
funded during 1997-98 for $966,430.  This
included one regional and four metropolitan
services, two ethno-specific (Cambodian and
Vietnamese) and two services for young
people frequenting the inner city (one
specifically targeting indigenous Australians).
The following specialist programs operated
through the FAYS (Family and Youth
Services) Community Based Programs
Branch:
  the Metropolitan Aboriginal Youth 

Team which addresses the over      
representation of young Aboriginal  
people in the juvenile justice system.  
The 1997- 98 program included Marine,
Wardang Island and Pets for Therapy 
Programs. Participants attending 
Wardang Island have completed  
approximately 600 hours of community 
service and 85 days of mandates, as 
community service in lieu of payment 
of fines;

  an Australian first, a home detention 
program using intensive supervision of 
young people while they pursue    
education, employment or training,  
supported by active electronic          
monitoring in their home.  The program 
has successfully managed over 100 
young people;

  an experiential education/wilderness 
challenge program designed specifically
for persistent offenders;

  the Remand INC Program which      
commenced on 1 December 1997     
provides short term family based    
alternative care for young people who 
have offended and who are unable to 
return home;

  the Bail Assessment Program which 
commenced in January 1998 and a ten 
day program for young people who are 
at risk of becoming persistent offenders;

  a Suicide Prevention Task Force report, 
commissioned by the Minister following
the 19th Congress of the International 
Association for Suicide Prevention, held
in Adelaide in March 1997, was 
released in April 1998.

Adoptions

Amendments to the Adoption Act 1988 and
Regulations commenced in October 1997.
The changes aimed to:
  balance the rights and needs for     

information of parties affected by   
adoption;

  comply with the requirements of the 
Hague Convention on the Protection of 
Children and Cooperation in Respect of 
Intercountry Adoption;

  ensure that children are afforded the 
opportunity to be heard in judicial    
proceedings in keeping with the UN 
Convention on the Rights of the Child;

  bring the Adoption Act 1988 in line 
with recent changes to the Family Law 
Act and other legislation.

Parenting Support

An independent evaluation identified a
successful first year of operation of the
Parenting Network at the Women s and
Children s Hospital.

Alternative Care

Alternative care services were restructured
following the implementation of a new
funding and service model during the latter
half of 1997.  This resulted in a consolidation
of services for families and children. Delivery
of a range of similar services to Aboriginal
families in rural and remote country areas
commenced in January 1998, and should be
completed by December 1998.

The Central Alternative Care Unit was
established within FAYS in December 1997.
It receives and processes all referrals for
family preservation and placement services;
collects and monitors data requirements; pays
subsidies to carers for the provision of care;
and approves and authorises expenditure for
brokerage funds.

25



The Foster Carers  Charter and Commitments
in Care were developed in partnership with
SA Foster Carers Association and the
Guardianship children s and young person s
advocacy group, Future Echoes.  The release
of these charters is an important step in
improving service delivery and promoting
partnership with stakeholders in the
alternative care system.  

Low Income Support

In 1997-98 the Low Income Support Program
continued to work with other service
providers in metropolitan and country regions
to implement a planned approach to service
for adults and families experiencing poverty
and financial disadvantage.  Total funding
provided to Low Income Support Program
services was $7,16,256.
Demand for financial counselling and support
services continued to climb with an increase
in the number of clients seeking financial
assistance (from 19,085 in 1996-97 to 22,029
in 1997-98) and a slight increase in the
number of financial support payments
provided.

Support for Rural Doctors
The State Government has initiated a number
of programs to help recruit and retain general
practitioners in rural South Australia,
including a $6 million rural enhancement
package, rural health scholarships, Cleve
Internship Programs and continuing funding
for medical education.

The SA Rural and Remote Medical Support
Agency commenced in April 1998 with the
amalgamation of the Rural Doctors
Association of SA and the SA Rural
Divisions General Practice Coordinating Unit.
The State Government contributed $200,000
to the inauguration of the agency whose role
is to coordinate activities, eliminate
duplication of functions and develop
strategies to assist the recruitment and
retention of doctors in rural South Australia.

The Rural Health Satellite Network was
provided with a $30,000 grant to support the
provision of continuing education services to
rural and remote doctors.

Rural Communities

A new Flying Doctors  Clinic at Wiawera
Station in the State s far north was opened on
22 March 1998.  

South Australia leads the nation in telehealth
and developed the national report on tele-
health issues for presentation to the Australian
Health Ministers' Advisory Council.

Aboriginal Communities

$300,000 was provided for a statewide
Specialist Renal Project under the Aboriginal
Health Partnership to develop a more
appropriate and efficient service to Aboriginal
patients.

Mental Health Services

A series of workshops, involving consumers,
carers, service providers and members of the
community was held to inform the Minister
and the department on issues and experiences
of people with mental illness.  Collaborative
models for mental health services with a
regional and local focus continue to be
developed.

A broad range of initiatives addressing mental
health service quality and scope, inter-
relationships between services and assistance
in linguistically and culturally appropriate
ways is ongoing.  Development of
partnerships between human services and
other  agencies assisting people with multiple
difficulties was a dominant theme.

Duke of Edinburgh s Award Program
An expedition was conducted for a group of
peer leaders and youth from disadvantaged
backgrounds participating in The Second
Story Urban Survival Program aimed at
saving youth from juvenile delinquency.
The fifteenth Annual Canoe Challenge at
Blanchetown with 260 participants and a
second Dukes Plus Program for young
offenders, with a third commenced, were also
held.

26



Care21 Coordinated Care Trial

The Care21 Coordinated Care Trial has been
operating since September 1997.  Its focus is
to provide a more coordinated approach to
care for people over the age of 65 and
involves 140 general practitioners and over
500 participants.  An initiative of State and
Commonwealth governments, the Care21
trial covers the northern local government
areas of Salisbury, Playford and Gawler and
will be completed in December 1999.

Participants have an individual case plan and
a package of care based on their
requirements.  The package provides
continuity throughout the health and
community care system involving general
practitioners, hospitals, pharmacists and

community service providers.  It also
acknowledges the importance of addressing
carers, needs.  Participants find that
individual care packages provide them with
more flexibility and choice in the selection of
services to meet their needs.  A strong
partnership between general practitioners,
participants and service coordinators is
improving health and wellbeing  outcomes.

Care21 is strongly supported by key human
service providers in the northern region;
including Adelaide Northern Division of
General Practice, Northern Suburbs Carers
Network, North West Adelaide Health
Service, Royal District Nursing Service and
the Pharmacy Guild of South Australia.

Single Assessment Project
As a corollary to Care21, a model of single
assessment for services to the aged in the
northern suburbs is being developed.  The
Director of Care21 advises on the model
development and implementation.  The
Northern Single Assessment Project is
recognised as an innovative project of
national significance.  

SA HealthPlus

Additional funding was allocated to the
HealthPlus coordinated care trial which has
continued to recruit patients with chronic
illnesses such as asthma and diabetes.  Over
400 general practitioners and 3000
metropolitan and country patients are now
taking part.  The trial, which is backed by
both State and Federal governments, will run
for two years and will eventually involve over
4000 patients.  

Options Coordination

Options Coordination provides a single entry
point to the service system for people with
disabilities and ensures the consistent

27

COORDINATED CARE

This covers outputs that provide care
options for those who have multiple needs
or chronic health conditions which require
formal planning and coordination of
services based on a specific care plan. 
South Australia is at the forefront of
coordinated care, developing innovative
programs such as Care21, Options
Coordination and HealthPlus that are
supporting people with complex needs in
metropolitan and country areas.  These
programs serve to provide a single
coordination point for all the care and
support required by an individual, with a
focus on preventing problems before they
occur.

The case management approach taken to
families in need provides a more holistic
approach to dealing with parents, children
and young people.  

Expenditure on coordinated care is $40
million which represents 2% of the budget.



determination of eligibility, assessment of
need and allocation of resources for the
purchase or procurement of services in all
disability areas.

Case Management

Case management activities of Family and
Youth Services aim to ensure that key
agencies act in a coordinated and
collaborative way to meet the complex and
multiple needs of families and children and
young people.  

Where a child protection investigation
assesses that the risk of further abuse or
neglect is high, the identification of family
needs and the resources required to meet
those needs drives ongoing work with the
family 

Where circumstances require that a child or
young person be placed in alternative care,
case management aims to provide placement
stability, appropriate levels of family contact
and ensure that their particular identified
needs are addressed.  

Case management for vulnerable young
people is primarily focused on referral to
agencies who undertake specialist work in
areas such as parent-child conflict or mental
health.  Work is progressing on an agreement
between Family and Youth Services and
Mental Health Services for young people with
mental health issues.

Case management, where poverty is an under-
pinning factor in child protection issues, is
focused on achieving long-term change using
financial counselling and financial support as
tools.  Preventative projects are being
developed to address specific needs in each
locality.  Currently some locations are
working on preventative projects for children
under Guardianship of the Minister before
they move into independent living situations.

28



Crisis Care

Crisis Care provides an after hours emergency
assistance, counselling and support service to
families and children throughout South
Australia.  The service experienced strong
demand over the past 12 months, receiving a
total of 56,003 calls.  There were 15,589 calls
to the Central Intake Team and Yaitya
Tirramangkotti.

Crisis Care continued to provide additional
services by contracting in after hours
assessment and response to the Rape and
Sexual Assault Service, Options Coordination
(IDSC) and the Domestic Violence Helpline.
A well trained and active volunteer team
operates at the unit and is extremely
important in augmenting the work of staff.

Crisis Accommodation 

Funds for the Crisis Accommodation Program
(CAP) are administered by the South
Australian Housing Trust in conjunction with
the Joint Officers Group (made up of
Commonwealth and State representatives).
This program provides capital funding for
expanding and upgrading emergency and
transitional accommodation.  Housing
provided through this program is leased to
community organisations offering emergency
accommodation to homeless people or those
at risk of becoming homeless.  The 1997-98
CAP allocation was $3.178 million with $5
million carried over from previous funding
rounds.  During the year 44 projects were
funded from carryover funds and 13  major
projects worth an estimated $1.778 million
from this year's allocation.

Child Protection

During 1997-98 the department received a
total of 11 651 notifications from community
members and those mandated by law to notify
suspected child abuse and neglect.  This is a
15% increase over 1996-97.  In metropolitan
districts the increase in notifications was 10%,
whereas in country areas there was a 33%
increase, suggesting that the new Central
Child Abuse Report Line has been
particularly accessible to notifiers from the
country.

29

CRISIS AND ACUTE
CARE

This covers outputs that meet government s
obligation and statutory responsibility to
provide services to those in crisis and to
respond to the acute health care needs of
people requiring access to public hospital
services.  The outputs are characterised as
short term and episodic.

These outputs seek to meet the
government s objectives of cost-effective
care for those in need.  Those requiring
support in a time of crisis may be seeking
housing, health services, mental health
support, child protection or counselling.  

The demand for these services is escalating
due to the ageing of the population and
high rates of poverty in families and
amongst young people.  Crisis Care is
experiencing increasing demand and child
protection notifications continue to rise.
In the health arena there is increasing
demand for public hospital services,
increased community expectations, and
declining health insurance participation
rates.  

Expenditure on crisis and acute care is
$1,222 million which represents 50% of the
budget.



The central intake and differential response
systems have been in operation for over a
year and early results indicate a significant
improvement in the response to the most
serious cases.  Surveys of all child protection
intakes for two week periods in February
1996 and February 1998 enabled a direct
comparison pre and post reform.

Of notifications rated Tier 1 (children in
danger), 80% were investigated immediately
in 1998 compared to just 60% in 1996.
Confirmation of abuse or neglect following
investigation of Tier 1 cases also rose from
35% to 47%.  Investigation rates for Tier 2
notifications (children at risk) also increased
from 53% in 1996-97 to 75% in 1997-98,
with confirmation rates for this group of
cases increasing marginally from 28% to
29%.  For the eight month period since the
reform was implemented (November 1997 to
June 1998), 80% of Tier 1 cases and 79% of
Tier 2 cases were investigated.  

In Tier 3 cases (children in need) the families
are invited to attend meetings with
departmental staff to discuss the reported
problems.  Two thirds of invited families have
attended these meetings.  

Mental Health

A 24 hour, seven day specialist assessment
and crisis intervention service in the
metropolitan area and a triage service for
rural and remote areas are now accessible
statewide through a single telephone number.

Hospital Waiting Lists

$7.5 million was allocated in the 1997-98
health budget for projects to reduce waiting
lists and increase efficiency.  There was a
significant fall in the number of urgent over-
due patients and a corresponding decrease in
clearance time of public hospital waiting lists,
despite an increase in admission rates. 

Hospital Infrastructure
A $14.7 million redevelopment to provide
improved patient facilities and increase
efficiency in service delivery at the
Repatriation General Hospital commenced.  

Developments worth $4,700,000 to the
Roxby Downs health facility will improve
amenities for remote patients.

$5.6 million was provided for The Queen
Elizabeth Hospital Psychiatric Unit.  The
ICU/HDU facilities and laboratory services
were also upgraded.

$7.4 million was provided for stage 3 of the
Port Lincoln Hospital redevelopment to
improve amenities for country patients.

The State Government allocated $60 million
for the first two stages of Royal Adelaide
Hospital redevelopment which will provide
improved inpatient and outpatient
accommodation.

30



Housing Policy

Housing needs were analysed and policies
and initiatives developed to improve
responsiveness and enhance the integration of
housing assistance policies and programs
across the Department of Human Services.

Significant work has been undertaken to
develop a new Aboriginal housing authority,
including the development of a bilateral
agreement between the Commonwealth
Government and the State Government for the
provision of housing services to Aboriginal
people.  

Major reforms to the provision of public and
community housing in the areas of eligibility,
housing allocation and tenure were developed.

Agreement on a State Housing Plan was
negotiated with the Commonwealth and
funding pursuant to this secured.  Proposals
were developed for arrangements beyond the
expiry of the current Commonwealth and
State Housing Agreement in June 1999.  The
Department of Human Services participated
in and contributed to national housing policy
research and to performance indicator
development.

Ten Year Plan for the Ageing
The implementation of the Ten Year Plan
saw:

  the completion of a review of day     
centres;

  the commencement of a review of 
respite care services across the aged and 
young disability areas;

  the establishment of the HACC Service 
Providers Network, which will promote, 
inform, coordinate and develop new 
ideas across HACC-funded agencies and
examine the interface between them and 
other aged care organisations and      
service providers.

Adoption Policy

A policy for planning, funding and delivery of
adoption and affiliated services in South
Australia was developed in consultation with
all organisations providing services to people
affected by adoption.  The new policy will
inform the broad allocation of funds to
adoption services.

Intergovernment Agreements

Negotiations with the Commonwealth
continued on the new Australian Health Care

31

POLICY, MINISTERIAL
ADVICE

This covers outputs that respond to the
Government through the Minister as the
funder of human services.  It includes
Ministerial advice, policy, intergovernment
agreements and strategic relationships.

Policy development and planning is
informed by consultation with communities,
demographic profiles, surveys and analysis
of needs to ensure that priorities are met.   
Major projects this year included the
negotiation of Commonwealth/State
Agreements for health, housing and
disability services, and policy development
and planning for the better management of
issues related to housing allocations,
ageing, adoption and carers.

Expenditure on policy and Ministerial
advice is $15 million which represents 1%
of the budget.



Agreements (1998-2003) to maximise
Commonwealth funding, ensure that roles
and responsibilities are defined and that
appropriate levels of services are provided.

The Public Health Outcomes Funding
Agreement was signed.

The Minister for Disability Services signed
the second Commonwealth State Disability
Agreement on 26 May 1998.

Services to Older Aboriginal People

Aboriginal life expectancy is significantly
below the average for the non indigenous
population: 49 years compared to 75 years for
men and 62 years compared to 81 for women.
In 1997-98 the Department of Human
Services:
  increased the level of services to older 

Aboriginal people through the increased
allocations in the HACC program;

  recognised the role older Aboriginal 
people play in providing cultural and 
social leadership to their communities 
by funding a number of innovative   
programs through the OFTA grants        
program;

  commissioned research which involved 
an examination of the factors           
contributing to the reduced life 
expectancy of Aboriginal people.  

The department funded and facilitated
research on the ageing.  Initiatives in this area
included issues relevant to the Aboriginal
population, ageing and the economy and the
needs of the older population of the future.

Assistance for Families
Jumping to Heaven, a publication to help
educate young people about the experiences
of young refugees, was published, as was
research on the factors in early childhood
development which lead to adult
disadvantage.

The Carers Policy was finalised and a range
of projects designed to provide assistance for
carers was implemented.  A campaign to
encourage active participation of fathers in
parenting, the Dads In Families campaign,
was also completed.

Youth Services

The Youth Crossroads Fund was established
in mid-1997 to serve a small group of
vulnerable young people whose particular
needs could not be met by existing services.
An evaluation of the effectiveness and
efficiency of services, and the appropriateness
of the model of service delivery began.
Information gathered will help to determine
correlations between successful outcomes and
characteristics of the interventions providing
caseworkers with valuable information for
service planning.

Regional Health Planning

Regional Health Profiles were developed to
provide comprehensive information about
population projections, demographic
differences between regions and between
areas within regions, mortality and morbidity
rates and projected implications.  The profiles
will assist in identifying health priorities for
resource purposes.

Mental Health 

The findings of the  community up 
consultation process which was held to
review current directions in mental health are
informing the development of a statewide
strategic plan for mental health services.

Review of Community Benefit
Community Benefit SA was established in
1996 by the Government of South Australia
to distribute $3 million annually from gaming
machine taxes to assist charitable and social
welfare organisations.  The effectiveness and
efficiency of the operation and administration
of the fund were reviewed following the first
year of operation.

Competitive Neutrality

A unit was established to review current
legislation against competition principles.
Category 1 and 2 business enterprises were
confirmed, and assessment of diagnostic
pathology at the Institute of Medical and
Veterinary Science against competitive
neutrality guidelines commenced

32



SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH COMMISSION

33

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN
HEALTH 
COMMISSION

Annual Report
1997-98



The South Australian Health Commission Act
1976, established the Health Commission as a
body corporate having general powers
comparable with those of other State statutory
corporations.  The primary role and functions
of the Health Commission are  to promote the
health and wellbeing of the people of this
State  (section 16).  In performing this
general role and function, the Health
Commission is required to exercise a number
of particular functions identified in Section
16 of the Act that may be summarised as
follows:
  the institution and promotion of 

research;
  the collection of information;
  the assessment of requirements for 

services and the supply thereof;
  the implementation and operation of 

required services;
  assistance to other service suppliers;
  ensuring the efficiency and economy of 

service supply;
  ensuring the proper allocation of 

resources between health units;
  providing education, instruction and 

training;
  promoting voluntary participation in the 

provision of services;
  disseminating knowledge and          

information in the public interest;
  reviewing and evaluating policy and 

standards;
  maintaining a healthy living and    

working environment.

In the exercise of its function the Health
Commission is:
  subject to the control and direction of 

the Minister;
  empowered to take any action necessary

for the performance of its functions;
  required to encourage the participation 

of voluntary organisations and local 
governing bodies and to establish, 
where practicable, appropriate regional 
or local authorities for the provision of 
health services;

  empowered to delegate its powers or 
functions.

In October 1997, the South Australian Health
Commission was integrated into the newly
created Department of Human Services and
in April 1998 staff of the Central Office were
transferred to the department by a
proclamation under section 7 (3) (b) of the
Public Sector Management Act 1995.

34

ROLES AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES



Chair: Ms Christine Charles (appointed 16 April 1998)
Deputy Chair: Dr David Filby Ph D (appointed 30 March 1995)
Members: Professor William Runciman BSc, MBBCh, FANZA, PhD 

(re-appointed 30 November 1995)
Mr Jim Birch BHA (appointed 30 November 1995)
Ms Helen Tolstoshev RN, B Bus, Grad Dip Health Science 
(appointed 30 November 1995)

35

MEMBERS OF THE
COMMISSION



36

ORGANISATION CHART

Policy and Budget Division

Public and Environmental
Health Service

Aboriginal Health Division

Disability Services Office

Information Management
Division

Purchasing Office

Health Unit Management
Support Division

Business and Advisory Services
Division

Financial Risk Management
Unit

Private Development Unit

Casemix and Clinical Costing
Unit

Mental Health Unit

Chief Medical Officer

Chief Nursing Officer

SA HealthPlus Unit

Health Industry and
Export Development Unit

Health Online Unit

Human Resources
Strategy and Policy Unit

Internal Audit

SA Organ Donation
Agency

Chief Executive Officer

30 June 1998



The South Australian Health Commission,
supported by the Department of Human
Services, operates in a climate of changing
socio-economic trends including:
  ageing of the population - 14 per cent of

South Australians will be over the age of
65 by the turn of the century compared 
to 12 per cent nationally;

  the increasing life expectancy over the 
last 30 years particularly among the 
older age groups contrasted with the 
continuing lower life expectancy and 
higher disease prevalence patterns for 
Aboriginal people;

  the changing poverty demographic with 
single parents (21 per cent), younger 
single persons (19 percent) and families 
with children (12 per cent) experiencing 
the highest rates.

All of these factors serve to increase the
demand on services, including aged care,
disability and mental health services.  The
department responds to these imperatives by
focussing assistance on those in need, and by
applying the principles of prevention,
promotion of health and wellbeing, and early
intervention to maximise long term benefits to
the community whilst making more effective
use of the community s resources.    

Outcomes and Outputs

The outcomes were developed to take account
of key roles:
  human services working in partnership 

to contribute to quality of life goals for 
the community;

  human services responding to the formal
care and accommodation of people and 

to ensure that services are delivered to 
meet those needs;

  human services  role in innovation and 
in responding to Government policy.

Outputs reflect the objectives and priorities of
government in delivering its products and
services to the community.  The nominated
outputs for the South Australian Health
Commission reflect the strategic directions of
government for delivering human services to
the community.  They form a continuum of
care from the more preventive, self-
management focus of community wellbeing,
safety and support at one end to the more
interventional, obligatory focus of crisis and
acute care at the other.  

The outputs are: 
  Community Wellbeing, Safety and      

Support; 
  Personal Financial Assistance; 
  Accommodation and Care; 
  Community Care; 
  Coordinated Care; 
  Crisis and Acute Care;   
  Policy, Ministerial Advice.

37

INITIATIVES AND
ACHIEVEMENTS



Note: This table presents the indicative costs of the SA Health Commission s contribution to
Department of Human Services  outputs as presented throughout the Annual Report.  The table
was consolidated with other portfolio information and used as a representation of the
portfolio s outputs in the Treasury White Papers Estimates.
The information has been prepared on the basis of estimates of the Health Commission s
consolidated economic entity for 1997-98 and therefore differs substantially from the audited
financial information presented in this report for the Health Commission s  Chief Entity .

In the following pages, the South Australian Health Commission s initiatives and achievements
are listed under the relevant outputs.

38

OPERATING EXPENSES 1997-98 %
$ M

Community Wellbeing, Safety and Support 56 3%

Personal Financial Assistance 2 0%

Accommodation and Care 176 10%

Community Care 269 15%

Coordinated Care 30 2%

Crisis and Acute Care 1,247 70%

Policy, Ministerial Advice 6 0%

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 1,786 100%



Immunisation

The Commonwealth Government provided
$745,000 towards a measles vaccination
program to vaccinate all primary school
children in term three of 1998.  

$1.8 million of State funding was allocated to
provide free influenza vaccine to people over
70 years old.

Aboriginal Health

$1 million has been allocated to projects
under the Aboriginal Health Partnership.
These include:
  $511,781 for Aboriginal community 

controlled health services;
  $393,254 for mainstream organisations 

to increase numbers of Aboriginal 
health workers;

  $48,680 for health promotion activities 
by Aboriginal health workers working 
in mainstream organisations in the areas
of diabetes, substance misuse and sexual
health;

  $46,290 for upgrading the facilities at 
Point Pearce and Maitland.

Communicable Diseases

The South Australian HIV/AIDS Strategy
1997-99 was launched during AIDS
Awareness Week in December 1997.  The
aim of the strategy was to maintain a quality
education and prevention program to
eliminate the transmission of HIV in South
Australia; to minimise the personal and social
impact of infection and improve the quality
of life and life expectancy of those infected.  

The amalgamation of the SA Immunisation
Coordination Unit, the HIV/AIDS and
Related Programs Unit and the
Communicable Diseases Control Branch
resulted in improved recognition and
response to disease outbreaks.  In particular,
electronic notification of diseases by some
laboratories has expedited the investigation
process.

Sexually Transmitted Disease Diagnosis and
Management guidelines have been distributed

39

COMMUNITY
WELLBEING, SAFETY
AND SUPPORT

This covers outputs that have an impact at
the population level, promote health and
wellbeing and regulate environmental and
living standards.  These outputs promote the
caring role of families and communities and
have a community development focus.
In health, outputs seek to meet the
government s objectives of prevention,
health promotion and early intervention.
Important issues during 1997-98 included
food safety, immunisation of children and
older South Australians, and health
promotion.

Programs which focus on achieving these
outputs include screening services such as
Pap smears and breast xrays, immunisation
programs and monitoring and securing
public health in areas such as radiation,
food safety and water quality.  Funding
support is provided for a range of non-
government organisations, Aboriginal
Community Controlled health services, the
Guardianship Board and other advocacy
programs.

Expenditure on community wellbeing, safety
and support is $56 million and represents
3% of the health budget.



40

to general practitioners and standards of care
have been monitored as part of STD
notification systems.

Health Promotion

Primary health care grants worth $1.5 million
for health promotion projects were announced
on 2 June 1998.  Priority areas are mental
health, diabetes education, Aboriginal health,
maternal and child health, immunisation and
violence and abuse.

Making the Move Towards Health Promoting
Hospitals, Health Services and Regions was
released.  This guide provides advice on
improving health care structures, processes
and outcomes to become progressively more
consumer focused and to promote health in
the community.  

Screening

BreastScreen SA completed its 300,000th
mammogram screening in February 1998 and
announced a $1 million expansion.  The
funding helped to buy additional
mammography units, expand the Marion
Clinic and provide mobile screening services
to low participation areas.

BreastScreen SA provided 58,000 screens in
1997-98 compared with 50,000 in the
previous year.  Early detection through
screening of women with no symptoms in the
targeted age group is beginning to reduce
mortality from breast cancer.

A computerised reminder system for taking
Pap smears was introduced by the Cervix 

Screening Program.  The cervical cancer rate
was found to be the lowest on record (since
1987).
Mental Health

 The Women and Depression Project 
investigated alternative counselling and
support models to assist women with mental
health problems in addressing difficulties with
life issues as well as managing their illness.
The project highlighted the needs of women
with long term mental illness and encouraged
providers across mental health, community
health and women s health to work together
more effectively.

Through the National Youth Suicide Strategy
Prevention Program, $100,000 was allocated
to fund training for a range of people working
in this area.

Food Safety
A large number of cases of food poisoning
from Salmonella Oranienberg were
investigated.  Production processes were
reviewed and altered at the source and action
taken to ensure the safety of raw materials
used in manufacturing.  Following the
identification and elimination of the probable
source, no further cases were reported.



Epidemiology

New Clinical Epidemiology units were
established at Women s and Children s
Hospital ($250,000), Royal Adelaide Hospital
($250,000), Johanna Briggs Institute
($200,000) and Flinders Medical Centre
($250,000).
Genetic Diagnosis

The Women s and Children s Hospital was
allocated $201,000 to establish the Cancer
Genetic Services to expand cancer-focused
genetic diagnosis.

Lead Levels

Blood testing of Port Pirie children indicated
a further reduction in the average blood lead
level.  The level has fallen from 12.1 g/dl in
1995 to 10.1 g/dl in 1998.  The Port Pirie
Lead Program has been a major contributor to
this reduction.

Consumer Support

The Health Consumer Support Office
provides a free call Health Advice and
Information telephone call facility and assists
around 10,000 callers each year with a
comprehensive and customer focused service.  

State and regional consumer advisory
mechanisms were resourced and supported
and consumers of mental health services are
now involved in a range of decision making
and advisory forums.  

A Thanksgiving Service to recognise and
acknowledge organ donors was held in May.
South Australia continues to have the highest
organ donation rate in Australia.  

Community Support

A Health Digest, an electronic product that
can answer commonly asked questions about
health and health services in South Australia,
was produced.

The Health Commission participated in the
Government Call Centre project. A due
diligence exercise on Teletech International
and its subsidiary, High Performance
Healthcare, in relation to its capacity to
undertake health business, has been
completed.

Radiation Safety
The Radiation Protection Branch Internet
Service promotes and provides information on
best practices in radiation protection to
minimise the risks from public and
occupational exposures to radiation.  Material
published on the Internet includes information
bulletins on legislation and specific uses of
radiation, and radiation safety notices and
alerts.  

Research

The Adelaide Clinical Dental Research Centre
is being established at the Adelaide Dental
Hospital through a SA Health Commission
grant of $200,000.

41



42

Patient Assistance Transport Scheme

The Patient Assistance Transport Scheme
assists rural patients with the cost of travel
and accommodation when they are required
to travel over 200 kilometres (or from
Kangaroo Island to the mainland) to receive
medical specialist treatment that is not
available at a nearer centre.  In 1997-98,
approximately 17 000 people were assisted at
a cost of $2,058,400.

South Australian Spectacles Scheme

The South Australian Spectacles Scheme
assists eligible people to obtain basic optical
appliances at a reduced cost.  Eligibility is
restricted to residents of South Australia who
hold either a Pensioner Concession Card or
have held a Health Care Card for at least 12
months.  In 1997-98, approximately 74,000
people were assisted at a cost of $1,441,200.

Pharmaceuticals

Pharmaceuticals are provided at a reduced
cost to Commonwealth Health Care Card
holders accessing public hospital outpatient
services.  General patients pay a fee of $15
per item while those eligible for the
concessional rate pay $3.20 up to the Safety
Net Threshold specified under the
Pharmaceutical Benefits Safety Net Scheme,
after which pharmaceuticals are provided
free.  

It is not possible to estimate the total number
of concessional recipients or expenditure.
A 1998 survey of three metropolitan public
hospitals suggests that expenditure on
concessional pharmaceuticals could be in the
order of $1 million for the State.  

Home Assist

$100,000 was allocated through Home Assist
programs through local councils or the
Disability Resource Centre for aged people
and people with disabilities to buy and install
smoke alarms.  

PERSONAL FINANCIAL
ASSISTANCE

This covers outputs that contribute to
quality of life by providing financial support
to help people afford appropriate health
services.  

This assistance is targeted to people who
are financially disadvantaged.  It provides
for outpatient prescriptions and spectacles
and makes it easier for country people to
afford transport to the city for treatment not
provided in their locality.

Expenditure on personal financial
assistance is $2 million.



Disability Services

The Disability Services Office in conjunction
with the Intellectual Disability Services
Council identified a range of strategies for the
redevelopment of Strathmont Centre.  This
includes an aged care facility, relocation of

some clients to community accommodation
and refurbishment facilities for the remaining
residents.

In a joint project between Julia Farr Services
and the South Australian Health Commission,
a strategy for the future redevelopment of
services is being formulated.

Aged Care
A project was established to integrate
technology and health care to enable more
aged people to live independently at home.

Country aged care facilities were upgraded at
the Hawker Great Northern War Memorial
Hospital ($460,000), the Hills Mallee
Southern region ($3,900,000) and as part of
the Kangaroo Island Hospital Redevelopment
($2,800,000).
An evaluation of aged care services within
the Wakefield and Hills Mallee Southern
regions is being undertaken to ensure that
service providers are working cooperatively
to maximise the benefit to patients and
clients.

In the Hills Mallee Southern region, 45
additional Commonwealth funded nursing
home placements were or will be located
within seven local health units with joint
financing from local communities and the
Health Commission.

Julia Farr Services participated in developing
a Consortium for Education and Training
with Ashford Hospital, Aged Care and
Housing to provide a one-stop shop for health
education.

Funding of $250,000 was provided to
hospitals for home ventilation equipment for
patients on discharge.

43

ACCOMMODATION
AND CARE

This covers outputs that provide
accommodation and integrated care options
for individuals and families who, for
reasons of vulnerability, dislocation or
disability, cannot live unassisted in a
normal community setting.  

Accommodation and care programs include
nursing homes and hostels, hospices for the
terminally ill, and accommodation for
people with a physical disability or
impaired mental health that prevents them
from managing in the community setting.  It
also covers rehabilitation and non-acute
care in metropolitan and country hospitals.  

The changing context for human services
needs to encompass a number of socio-
economic demographic trends. Trends that
include the ageing of the population - 14
per cent of South Australians will be over
the age of 65 by the turn of the century,
compared to 12 per cent nationally - and
increasing life expectancy for most of the
population.  It is predominantly these older
age groups and their families that need to
feel that accommodation and care programs
will be there to support them if they become
too frail to manage in the community.
Expenditure on accommodation and care is
$176 million and represents 10% of the
health budget.



44

Hospital Standards
Accreditation was awarded to Yorketown
Hospital, Melaleuca Court Nursing Home
(Minlaton), Southern Yorke Peninsula
Community Health Service, Wallaroo
Hospital and Northern York Private Hospital.

Hospital Projects
Demonstration projects to explore ambulatory
care reform have shown real benefits in terms
of patient outcomes and cost effectiveness.
These projects have improved patient access
to outpatient services through redistribution of
provider facilities throughout the metropolitan
area.

The State Government has allocated $60
million for the first two stages of Royal
Adelaide Hospital redevelopment that will
provide improved inpatient and outpatient
accommodation.  A number of projects were
progressed including stage 1 of its
redevelopment, physiological monitoring, and
renovation of the Margaret Graham Building.

Funding of $2 million was provided to
Flinders Medical Centre for operating theatre
equipment, convalescent and rehabilitation
facilities, and to upgrade its entrance.

A number of infrastructure projects were
funded for the Women s and Children s
Hospital.  They included the Telemedicine
facility, the upgrade of the interim Good
Friday Ward, the Queen Victoria Hospital
building balustrades and the relocation of the
Brookman Ward (a project undertaken with
substantial financial input from two Adelaide
football identities, Tony McGuiness and Chris
McDermott).
The North Western Adelaide Health Service
expanded the telehealth project by purchasing
videoconferencing equipment for a
 telerespiratory in the home  project.
A $14.7 million redevelopment of the
Repatriation General Hospital commenced to
provide improved patient facilities and
increased efficiency in service delivery.
It will provide a new allied health unit, a
gymnasium and hydrotherapy pool and pur-
pose built rehabilitation wards.  Construction
of the day surgery facility commenced at an
estimated cost of $2.35 million.

Consumer support 
The Health Consumer Support Office
provided interim accommodation
reimbursement and direct payment services,
through the Patient Assistance Transport
Scheme, to over 1500 rural outpatients in
1997-98 who were required to stay for
extended periods in Adelaide for treatment.
This assistance also extends to South
Australian patients referred interstate by the
major hospitals for specialised transplant
surgery and paediatric cardiac surgery.

Community Care
A $6.8 million upgrading of Hampstead
Centre was announced, as part of Stage 1 of
the Royal Adelaide Hospital redevelopment.
This will further strengthen the links and
coordination of rehabilitation, domiciliary and
community based care to provide a more
efficient service to families and the
community.

Rural Initiatives
Existing and ageing information systems in
large country hospitals are progressively
being replaced with modern systems
compatible with those recently implemented
in smaller country hospitals. Fire upgrading
projects were implemented at twelve country
hospitals, totalling $180,000.
Meningie, Millicent, Southern Yorke
Peninsula, Loxton, Balaklava, Riverton,
Kapunda, Clare and Cummins hospitals were
funded for minor works projects including
replacement of a nurse call system and a
generator, medical equipment replacement
and upgrading an air-conditioning unit.

Chronic Illnesses
Funding of $110,000 was provided to support
a multi-centred Chronic Obstructive
Pulmonary Disease project.
Palliative Care
After consultation with services and
consumers, the Strategic Plan for Palliative
Care Services in SA was developed.  The plan
recognises that palliative care is a specialty
service requiring improved coordination and
integration and describes the best practice
model under which palliative care services
will be purchased in the future.



Mental Health Services

A series of workshops, involving consumers,
carers, service providers and members of the
community was held to inform the Minister
and the department on issues and experiences
of people with mental illness.  Collaborative
models for mental health services with a
regional and local focus continue to be
developed.

A broad range of initiatives addressing mental
health service quality and scope, inter-
relationships between services and assistance
in linguistically and culturally appropriate
ways is ongoing.  Development of protocols
between human services and other agencies

assisting people with multiple difficulties is a
dominant theme.

Disability Services

The Disability Information Resource Centre
provides an electronic bulletin board service
called Common Ground for people with an
interest in disability.  The service raises
awareness of disability issues.

A review was undertaken on the operation of
the Independent Living Equipment Program,
and its recommendations will be implemented
from 1 July 1998.

South Australia, Western Australia and the
Northern Territory jointly funded the
Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara
(NPY) Women s Council Aboriginal
Corporation Allied Health Project to support
people with a disability from Aboriginal
communities in the cross border districts.

Aboriginal Communities

$300,000 was provided for a statewide
Specialist Renal Project under the Aboriginal
Health Partnership to develop a more
appropriate and efficient service for
Aboriginal patients.

Services for Rural Communities
In 1998 a new Flying Doctor s Clinic was
opened by the Minister for Human Services at
Wiawera Station in the State s far north.  

A 24 hour health hotline was established for
the communities of the northern and far
western areas of South Australia, funded from
within existing services.  

$46,000 was provided for the Nurse
Practitioner Project which is examining how
nurse practitioners might provide a cost
effective best practice option for health
services in a variety of settings.

45

COMMUNITY CARE

This covers outputs that enable individuals
and families to function in the community
setting. Options recognise the caring roles
of families and carers.
Many of the people who need this support
are older South Australians, who will
comprise 14% of the population by the year
2000.  They are choosing home based care
services rather than nursing homes.
Support is also provided through programs
such as RDNS, Domiciliary Care and 13
incorporated community health centres.  

Community teams provide support to those
with mental illness and their families to
enable them to live in the community.

General Practitioners are recognised as the
cornerstone of primary medical care.  In
1997-98 a number of programs were
established to support continuing education
of doctors and to attract general
practitioners to country areas.  

Expenditure on community care is $269
million and represents 15% of the health
budget.



The Office of Public Advocate conducted a
series of education sessions in several country
regions about guardianship and mental health.

South Australia is leading the nation in tele-
health and developed the national report on
telehealth issues for presentation to the
Australian Health Ministers' Advisory
Council.

In April 1998, Health OnLine completed
diabetes, hepatitis C and asthma patient care
products.  The use of these products is being
trialled on the Eyre Peninsula.

Support for Rural Doctors
The State Government initiated a number of
programs to help recruit and retain general
practitioners in rural South Australia,
including a $6 million rural enhancement
package, rural health scholarships, the Cleve
Internship Program and continuing funding
for medical education.

The Health Commission participated with the
universities of Adelaide and South Australia
in securing Commonwealth funding for the
establishment of a University Department of
Rural Health at Whyalla.

The SA Rural and Remote Medical Support
Agency commenced in April 1998 with the
amalgamation of the Rural Doctors
Association of SA and the SA Rural
Divisions General Practice Coordinating Unit.
The State Government contributed $200,000
to the inauguration of the agency whose role
is to coordinate activities, eliminate
duplication of functions and develop
strategies to assist the recruitment and
retention of doctors in rural South Australia.

The Rural Health Satellite Network received a
$30 000 grant to help provide continuing
education services to rural and remote
doctors.

Health on the Net, a network for medical
practitioners was launched in July 1997.  This
will serve as an initial implementation for the
broader adoption of a medical virtual private
network across the divisions of general
practice in South Australia.  Approximately
20% of general practitioners now participate
in Health on the Net as part of their
continuing education.

A two-day workshop to address the problems
of recruiting and retaining country doctors
was held.  

Community Support

An independent evaluation identified a
successful first year of operation of the
Parenting Network at the Women s and
Children s Hospital.

Information Systems 
Four major information system initiatives
were undertaken within the community health
sector, at a combined cost of over $2 million.
These included infrastructure projects,
replacement of existing patient management
systems, development of information
management strategic plans, and
commencement of a multistate project to
develop a new Community Health
Information Management Enterprise system.

Nineteen community health services have
been provided with upgraded computing
facilities and strategic plans have been
developed.  South Australia is involved in a
national project to develop a new Community
Health Information Management Enterprise
(CHIME) system.

46



SA HealthPlus

Additional funding was allocated to the SA
HealthPlus Coordinated Care Trial which has
continued to recruit patients with chronic
illnesses such as asthma and diabetes.  Over
400 general practitioners and 3000
metropolitan and country patients are now
taking part.  The trial, which is backed by
both the State and Federal governments, will
run for two years and will eventually involve
over 4000 patients.  

Options Coordination

Options Coordination provides a single entry
point to the service system for people with
disabilities and ensures the consistent
determination of eligibility, assessment of
need and allocation of resources for
purchasing services in all disability areas.

Rural Communities

A review was conducted in partnership with
the Mid North Division of General
Practitioners to identify and evaluate diabetes
services in the region.

The Eyre Region has developed a wide-
ranging SA HealthPlus trial covering areas as
far afield as Ceduna, Whyalla, Port Lincoln
and Lower Eyre Peninsula.  The SA
HealthPlus trials will be greatly enhanced by
an IT network, as an integrated health care
delivery system depends upon rapid access to
patient data and a wide range of health
service information.  

Information Technology
A World Wide Web Internet project, to
provide consumers and clinicians with on-line
access to medical and health information has
commenced and is being rapidly developed.
This health information resource will contain
the details of all South Australian health
units.  A web site for the whole of the
Department of Human Services is well under
way and there is an interim web site in place
at www.dhs.sa.gov.au.

47

COORDINATED CARE

This covers outputs that provide care
options for those who have multiple needs
or chronic health conditions which require
formal planning and coordination of
services based on a specific care plan. 
South Australia is at the forefront of
coordinated care, developing innovative
programs such as HealthPlus which serves
to provide a single coordination point for all
the care and support required by an
individual, with a focus on preventing
problems before they occur.
Integrated health care plans are being
developed for patients in HealthPlus trials
across the state with conditions including
diabetes, and cardiac, respiratory and
chronic pulmonary diseases. These will
reduced acute hospital admissions and play
a key role in future care of the aged.
Options Coordination supports those with
disabilities that are able to live
independently or with their families in the
community.

Expenditure on coordinated care is $30
million which represents 2% of the health
budget.



Accident and Emergency Services

The First Response Program, a joint program
developed by the departments of Human
Services and Emergency Services and
launched in April 1998, will greatly reduce
confusion at accident sites, thereby saving
more lives.

Medical Support

Funding of $491,000 was made available for
providing recombinant Factor VIII for South
Australian haemophiliacs.

In March 1998, the South Australian
Government announced funding for a trial
examining the use of oral Naltrexone as a
maintenance therapy for opioid dependence.
The Drug and Alcohol Services Council is
collaborating with the University of Adelaide
and Royal Adelaide Hospital in this project.  
Mental Health

A 24 hour, seven day a week specialist
assessment and crisis intervention service in
the metropolitan area and a triage service for
rural and remote areas were made more
accessible through a single telephone number
statewide.

A project called  Forging Links  was initiated
to determine the most appropriate way to
provide assessment and crisis intervention
services to Aboriginal people experiencing
emotional and social wellbeing difficulties.

Hospital Waiting Lists

$7.5 million was allocated in the 1997-98
health budget for projects aimed at reducing
waiting lists in hospitals and increasing
efficiency.  There has been a significant fall
in the number of urgent overdue patients and
a corresponding decrease in clearance time of
public hospital waiting lists, despite an
increase in admission rates.  

As at April 1998, there were 7469 people on
the booking lists of six major metropolitan
hospitals.  This represents a decrease of 0.9% 

48

CRISIS AND ACUTE
CARE

This covers outputs that meet Government s
obligation and statutory responsibility to
provide services to those in crisis and to
respond to the acute health care needs of
people requiring access to public hospital
services.  The outputs are characterised as
short term and episodic.

In the health area, outputs seek to meet the
government s objectives of cost-effective
treatment and care to those in need.
Important factors to be considered are the
increasing demand for public hospital
services which grew by 48% in 1997-98 due
to population growth and ageing, increased
community expectation regarding new
services, improvements in medical practice
and declining health insurance
participation rates.  

There are 59 incorporated health facilities
in South Australia, nine in the metropolitan
area and 50 in the country.  In 1997-98
these hospitals had 348,940 admissions and
1,752,239 outpatient attendances.  They
employed over 20,000 staff.
Expenditure on crisis and acute care is
$1,247 million which represents 70% of the
health budget.



compared with the previous month and a
decrease of 10.6% compared with April 1997.

Rural Hospital Improvements

$7.4 million was provided for stage 3 of the
Port Lincoln Hospital redevelopment to
improve amenities for country patients.

$100,000 was spent on upgrading the North
East Wing of the Ceduna Hospital.

The Cummins Hospital Theatre Block
improvements ($117,000) were undertaken.
The new $21.4 million Port Augusta Hospital
opened in December 1997.  This was
facilitated through a private finance leaseback
arrangement.

Developments of $4,700,000 to the Roxby
Downs health facility will improve amenities
for remote patients.

The refurbished Hawker Great Northern War
Memorial Hospital was opened in June 1998
and will provide the local community and
visitors to the Flinders ranges with modern
facilities.

Infrastructure Developments
$670,000 was provided to Modbury Hospital
for a temporary operating theatre.

$5.6 million was provided for The Queen
Elizabeth Hospital Psychiatric Unit.  The
ICU/HDU facilities and laboratory services
were also upgraded.

The cardiac angiography suite at the Royal
Adelaide hospital was redeveloped.

Hospital Standards
On its 25th birthday, in February 1998,
Modbury Hospital was re-accredited for a
further three years by the independent
Australian Council on Health Care Standards.
Metropolitan Hospital Equipment Purchases

Metropolitan Hospital Equipment
Purchases
Royal Adelaide Hospital purchased a CT
Scanner at a cost of $1.7 million and physio-
logical monitors and ventilator equipment for
intensive care for $1.35 million.  A new state-
of-the-art catheter laboratory was opened,
replacing the previous 15 year old facility.  It

includes the latest angiography equipment for
carrying out investigations and procedures for
treating heart disease.  

North Western Adelaide Health Service,
Queen Elizabeth Hospital Campus was
provided with $600,000 for the ultrasound
unit and $550,000 for the upgrade of the
Cardiac Monitoring Equipment Coronary
Care Area.  The North Western Adelaide
Health Service was also provided $281,000
for an endoscopic facility at its TQEH
campus, and $120,000 for intensive care unit
ventilators for its Lyell McEwin Health
Service campus.  An Orthopaedic Service was
established at the Lyell McEwin Health
Service.

At the Women s and Children s Hospital a
mass spectrometer was funded for $676 000.
The Institute of Medical and Veterinary
Science installed automated cytology
screening at a cost of $790,000.

Rural Hospital Equipment Purchases
and Minor Works

Medical equipment purchases include an
ultrasound unit at Riverland Regional Health
Service, $150,000; two anaesthetic machines
at Mount Gambier Hospital, $200,000; and
sterilisers and medical imaging equipment at
Port Augusta Hospital, $410,000.
Three projects were undertaken at a total cost
of $117,000 at Mount Barker Hospital.
Approval was also given for obstetrics
equipment ($22,000), an operating
microscope ($50,000) and ophthalmology
equipment ($45,000).
Port Pirie Health Service was allocated
$100,000 for endoscopic equipment and
minor works.

Capital funding facilitated the purchase of
equipment to extend the telepsychiatry system
to all regional and sub-regional hospitals.
This covers an additional 11 sites to make 17
videoconferencing sites in all, including the
Rural Health Training Unit which provides
distance education programs.

49



Information Technology
$2.4 million was provided for implementation
of the new pathology system at IMVS and the
Women s and Children s Hospital.
Implementation was completed at the
Women s and Children s Hospital during
1997-98, and will be completed at IMVS in
1998-99.

$6 million was spent on patient systems.
Major initiatives during the year included
work on the implementation of accident and
emergency systems, planned for seven sites;
theatre management systems at six
metropolitan hospitals; and patient
information  systems, initially planned for
four sites.

OACIS, the computerised clinical information
system designed to deliver up to date
information for clinicians at the point of care,
has now been established at the four renal
units: The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Royal
Adelaide Hospital, Flinders Medical Centre,
and the Women s and Children s Hospital.
Extension of the existing pilot to other
clinical disciplines and a broader cross-
section of health units will be subject to
evaluation of a number of factors and a
compelling business case.  

Approximately $543,000 was spent on
specialist systems including SA HealthPlus
systems and the Medical Virtual Network.

50



Aboriginal Health Partnerships

The South Australian Aboriginal Health
Partnership launched the Aboriginal Health
Regional Plans  The First Step  in November
1997.  They include eight separate Regional
Plans, covering the metropolitan area and the
seven rural and remote regions.  The plans
provide a state picture of health service
delivery to Aboriginal people and identify the
gaps, opportunities and health priorities in
each region.  The aim is to use them to
improve both individual and environmental
health services to all Aboriginal communities
in South Australia.

In developing the plans, five priorities were
identified in every Aboriginal community in
South Australia.  These were

  more Aboriginal health workers, with 
appropriate support arrangements;

  diabetes;
  social and emotional wellbeing (mental 

health);
  substance misuse;
  the need for a culturally appropriate and

responsive health system.

These common elements form the basis for
the Partnership's Key Statewide Actions and
inform the work being undertaken in 1998-
2000.

Benchmarking and Best Practice

The Health Commission is involved in a
number of activities to develop performance
indicators and, eventually, benchmarks for the
Australian health care system.  The emphasis
to date has been on public acute hospitals
because of their importance in the health
sector and the generally greater availability of
performance indicator data for hospitals.

In line with the Medicare Agreement,
performance targets and elective surgery and
emergency department waiting times
continued to be monitored.

Intergovernment Activities

The Health Commission continued
negotiations with the Commonwealth on the
new Australian Health Care Agreements
(1998-2003) to maximise Commonwealth
funding, ensure that roles and responsibilities
are defined and that appropriate levels of
services are provided.

There were major concerns for South
Australia about the quantity of funds and

51

POLICY, MINISTERIAL
ADVICE

This covers outputs that respond to the
Government through the Minister as the
funder of human services.  It includes
Ministerial advice, policy, intergovernment
agreements and strategic relationships.

Policy development and planning is
informed by consultation with communities,
demographic profiles, surveys and analysis
of needs to ensure that priorities are met.   
Negotiations with the Commonwealth on a
new five year Health Care Agreement that
will replace the Medicare Agreement
centred on ensuring that South Australia s
health services would be able to maintain
their quality and accessibility into the
future. 
Expenditure on policy and Ministerial
advice is $6 million in a budget of $1,786
million.



terms and conditions of funding for the new
Health Care Agreement.  The Medicare
Agreement ceased on 30 June 1998 and the
Commonwealth offered an annual grant,
pending agreement by the parties.

The Public Health Outcomes Funding
Agreement was signed.

The Minister for Disability Services signed
the second Commonwealth State Disability
Agreement in May 1998.

The third, Report on Government Services, by
the Productivity Council was released in
1998.  The report compares performance of
state health systems with a number of key
indicators, and shows that South Australian
hospitals (with Victorian hospitals) have the
lowest cost per casemix category.  However,
South Australia has the highest number of
hospital episodes per head of population.  

In April 1998 an 18 month Memorandum of
Understanding was signed between the
Department of Human Services and the
Department of Correctional Services to ensure
the on-going provision of custodial health
services.  This MOU will significantly
improve the planning, coordination,
integration and delivery of custodial health
services to prisoners and offenders.

Health Commission staff participated in a
number of national and local working groups
which included consumers.  These groups
addressed information, privacy and
confidentiality, the development of best
practice guidelines and a range of other
service issues.

Planning
Special attention was given to the collection
of health data through population surveys
(Social Environmental Risk Context
Information Systems and Health Omnibus)
with emphasis on mental health, disability
and migrant health.  

Regional Health Profiles were developed to
provide comprehensive information about
population projections, demographic
differences between regions and between
areas within regions, mortality and morbidity
rates and projected implications.  The profiles
will assist in identifying health priorities for
human and physical resourcing.

The Children's and Young Persons' Mental
Health Services Plan was finalised and a
preliminary document for early intervention
services was drafted.  A Strategic Plan for
Health and Community Services titled
Moving Ahead and a Health Promotion Plan
for Older People commenced.  

Consultation

The Child Health Council and the Older
Persons Health Council continued to provide
advice on the health status and needs of these
two population groups.  These councils also
monitor the effects of changes within the
South Australian publicly funded health
system on these populations.  Their role
encompasses monitoring the implementation
of relevant policies and developing an
evaluation and review process focusing on
whether defined targets have been achieved.

A  community up  consultation process was
held to review current directions in mental
health.  Submissions were received and work-
shops held on specific topics. Findings from
this process are being used to inform the
development of a statewide strategic plan for
mental health services.

The public and professional awareness
campaign for the Consent to Medical
Treatment and Palliative Care Act 1995
continued and the associated pamphlet was
revised and updated in response to feedback
from the public.

Support for Community Initiatives
The Minister for Human Services presented a
cheque for $59,000 to the Florey Centenary
Committee which had a number of events
planned to celebrate the centenary of the
South Australian born scientist who
discovered penicillin.  A further $15,000 was
provided for establishment costs.

Disability Policy

A policy on equity and access to health
services was formulated to promote the
development of effective health services for
people with a disability.  The policy examines
how health services account for the specific
needs of disabled people.  

52



Funding of $159,925 was provided to enable
the preparation of the Disability Action Plan
for the public health sector.

Information Management
The benefits of adopting a well-managed,
centralised data repository were examined.
The repository or data warehouse provides an
opportunity to examine population based data
and complements the existing OACIS data
repository.  A Health Data Privacy Committee
has been established, to address the issues
related of privacy and security of patient data
stored in systems of this type.

The Inpatients Separations Information
System (ISIS) was replaced by a more
comprehensive new system (Integrated South
Australian Activity Collection, ISAAC) from
the start of the year.  A new MMSS (Monthly
Management Statistical System) is also being
developed.

Information Support
The South Australian Social Health Atlas is
used to identify mortality and illness across
the State and to relate these to the distribution
of groups in the population such as single
parent families, the unemployed and
Aboriginal people.  A Disability Chartbook
based on information from SERCIS is being

developed to highlight information about
people with a disability.

The Commonwealth Department of Health
and Family Services contracted the Health
Commission to produce the second edition of
the Social Health Atlas of Australia.
A system was devised for the timely reporting
of non-fatal road accident victims, so that
these statistics can be featured by the media
along with the statistics on fatalities. 

Partnerships Promoting Economic
Development

The Health Commission explored ways of
using the public health system s power as a
major purchaser of equipment and supplies to
attract health service and product industries to
South Australia.

The Health Commission is working with
individual South Australian health industry
companies to market and sell products over-
seas and interstate.  The Health Industry and
Export Development Unit also works with
Australian Health Industry (Inc), the private
sector s umbrella group.  A number of
strategic alliances were set up to promote
economic activity (for example with Western
Australia, the Northern Territory and
Malaysia).

53



54



Note:  The information in this section relates
to the operation of both the Department of
Human Services and the South Australian
Health Commission and forms the schedules
to the preceding annual reports.  Information
relating to employment, however, is combined
as Department of Human Services statistics
since all employees became Department of
Human Services employees from April 1998. 

55

CORPORATE ACTIVITIES
CORPORATE 
ACTIVITIES
Department of
Human Services 
and 
South Australian
Health Commission



Equal Employment Opportunity

As an Equal Employment Opportunity
employer, the Department of Human Services
is committed to employing on merit
regardless of race, gender, sexuality, marital
status, pregnancy or physical or intellectual
impairment.

Equal Opportunity and Sexual Harassment
policies reflect the principles of the Equal
Opportunity Act 1984, and the
Commonwealth Sex Discrimination Act 1984.
The department continues to review its
recruitment and selection policies and
practices.  In 1997-98, 135 contact officers
attended workshops on dealing with sexual
harassment.  

Enterprise Bargaining

Negotiations commenced on developing a
new enterprise agreement to cover employees
of the housing and health groups, excluding
medical officers and nurses for whom there
will be separate agreements.  The Department
of Family and Community Services
Enterprise Agreement No 2 continues in force
until 30 June 1999.

Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare
(OHS&amp;W)
In May 1998, the Department of Human
Services Interim Central Occupational Health
Safety and Welfare Committee was formed,
comprising representatives from both
management and employee groups within
human services.  In the transition, the
committee s role is to examine OHS&amp;W
issues across the agency.

The department continues its commitment to
achieving and maintaining Level 3 in all areas
of OHS&amp;W Prevention, (management
commitment, policy, training, hazard
management, consultation and
administration), Claims Administration and
Rehabilitation.

Training over the past year has included:
  interpretation of material safety data 

sheets;
  ongoing training for executives,       

managers, supervisors, OHS&amp;W    
representatives and union representatives
in occupational health, safety and     
welfare and managing injury at work;

  OHS&amp;W representative training;
  first aid and fire safety;
  dealing with potentially violent clients;
  managing stress and relaxation and    

surviving in a changing environment;
  manual handling and back care;
  driver education;
  office ergonomics;
  personal safety and security.

Strategic plans, action plans, and various
policies and procedures continue to be
reviewed on a regular basis and managing
injury at work training for managers and
supervisors continued throughout the year, as
did the process of identifying and training
delegates to assist in the rehabilitation
process.

The delegates  pilot program has now been in
operation for over 12 months and has assisted
in ensuring that initial contact with the client
occurs within ten days of the accident
happening; in reducing the time involved in

56

CORPORATE SUPPORT
AND DEVELOPMENT



the initial notification of injury to a
rehabilitation adviser; and in reducing the
time involved in returning to work.  Statistical
information on rehabilitation is provided to
OHS&amp;W committees on a regular basis.

Occupational Health and Safety
Statistics

57

PREVENTION

Accidents reported 602

Major type of injury Sprains/Strains/Stress
WORKERS COMPENSATION

Claims lodged 206

Days lost 3 147

Claims of 5 days or more lost time 58

Total expenditure 2 173 370

Lump sum payments 171 603

REHABILITATION

Rehabilitation files 83

Note: This schedule includes the non-incorporated units that are part of the South Australian
Health Commission, Central Office, and the Mental Health Unit and those which come under
their auspices; the South Australian Housing Trust and the South Australian Community
Housing Authority, but excludes HomeStart Finance and the Parks Community Centre.

Leave Management

The average amount of sick leave taken per
full time equivalent during the year was seven
days.

Training and Development

The focus of 1997-98 training and
development was on:
  computer training;
  management development program for 

middle managers, project officers and 
first level supervisors;

  project design and management;
  Accredited Certificate III in Youth Work

(Residential Care) (a joint venture with 
COPE);

  risk management;
  case management;

  adolescent development and youth work;
  Aboriginal and NESB cultural diversity;
  financial counselling;
  child protection;
  restraint training;
  workplace assessor training;
  negotiation skills;
  consultation skills;
  facilitating change;
  developing customer partnerships;
  Graduate Certificate in Business (a joint 

venture with the University of South 
Australia);

  organisational review and improvement 
planning;

  integrative planning processes;
  developing organisational learning;



  introduction to critical thinking and 
problem solving;

  team based critical analysis and problem
solving;

  developing organisational learning;
  frontline managers program;
  HIDC (Self Study) Management Program;
  Influential Leadership Program (ILP);
  executive development.

Scholarships of $5000 each were awarded to
seven Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
students in May 1998.  They are studying for
degrees in nursing, administration dental
surgery and behavioural science.  One
scholarship has also been allocated to Flinders
University for the Bachelor of Nutrition and
Dietetics.  

An accredited training program was
developed for Youth Support Workers in
Secure and Community Residential Care in
conjunction with COPE.  Forty staff have
undertaken the course successfully.

A series of workshops which will change the
way health and medical education are
delivered to students and patients was held.
The Interactive Medical Curriculum Project,
developed by Adelaide-based Interactive
Health On-line, a unit of the South Australian
Health Commission, was launched at a two-
day workshop attended by delegates from
south east Asia and the United States.  

The Health Industry Development Centre
(HIDC) provides a corporate, professional and
expert human resource development service to
Department of Human Services employees
and its service delivery units.  HIDC
specialises in organisation and workforce
development solutions which anticipate
organisational needs in a rapidly changing
environment.  

In 1997-98 HIDC offered 34 courses, some
more than once, with a total of 52.

A joint initiative between HIDC and the
Adelaide Institute of TAFE Workplace
Education Services resulted in the
development of a program to meet the
significant skills needs of front line managers.  

HIDC has also developed programs such as
the Self Study Management Program as a
vehicle by which formal learning can be
integrated into the workplace.  This program
aims to improve service delivery through
improving management and targets the
transition from a technical to a professional
role to one of leader and manager.  The 1997-
98 financial year saw 49 managers start the
program and 29 graduate.

In seeking to build on traditional management
programs, the Influential Leadership Program
promotes effective management and
leadership.  In 1997-98 25 participants
successfully completed the seven and a half
day program.  

In November 1997, an Executive
Development Program was conducted with 12
participants undertaking professional
development plans.  This initiative gained
attention at the national level, with the
Western Australian Health Department s
engaging HIDC to  deliver the program to
their executives in 1997.

58



59

NON-EXECUTIVE EMPLOYMENT: 30 JUNE 1998

Head Count FTEs

Classification Male Female Total Ongoing Contract Casual Total

TRAINEES 11 49 60 6 54 0 60

ASO1 24 157 181 106.33 42.12 3.7 152.15

ASO2 30 127 157 120.08 27.25 0.03 147.36

ASO3 29 86 115 80.5 29.33 0 109.83

ASO4 25 40 65 47.8 15.6 0 63.4

ASO5 60 103 163 119.01 35.19 0 154.2

ASO6 37 47 84 60.1 21.6 0 81.7

ASO7 23 20 43 26.8 15.8 0 42.6

ASO 8 13 5 18 7.8 10 0 17.8

MAS1 3 2 5 3 2 0 5

MAS2 28 16 44 39.3 4 0 43.3

MAS3 4 2 6 4 2 0 6

PSO1 82 208 290 228.47 33.1 1.23 262.8

PSO2 26 68 94 67.15 20.37 0 87.52

PSO3 24 35 59 53.1 5 0 58.1

PSO4 8 2 10 9 1 0 10

PSO5 1 0 1 1 0 0 1

MPS2 1 0 1 1 0 0 1

MPS3 2 2 4 3 1 0 4

OPS1 2 12 14 1 2 0.29 3.29

OPS2 117 142 259 141.54 48.5 1.37 191.41

OPS3 94 58 152 138.77 9 0.03 147.8

OPS4 29 23 52 50.85 0 0 50.85

OPS5 14 5 19 19 0 0 19

TGO 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 2

TGO2 7 2 9 6.8 2 0 8.8

TGO3 5 0 5 5 0 0 5

TGO4 1 0 1 0 1 0 1

NG3 0 3 3 2.38 0 0 2.38

MHN3 3 4 7 6 1 0 7



60

NON-EXECUTIVE EMPLOYMENT: 30 JUNE 1998 (Continued)
Head Count FTEs

Classification Male Female Total Ongoing Contract Casual Total

RN1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1

RN2 0 16 16 8.39 5.78 0 14.17

RN3 2 10 12 9.79 2 0 11.79

RN4 0 1 1 1 0 0 1

RN5 1 0 1 1 0 0 1

MD1 2 7 9 1.6 6.1 0 7.7

MD2 13 2 15 12.61 1.5 0 14.11

WHA1 0 2 2 0.53 0 0.11 0.64

WHA4 0 1 1 1 0 0 1

HAE1 0 4 4 1.05 1.08 0 2.13

HAE 2 3 6 9 4.47 2.16 0.03 6.66

HAE3 2 5 7 3 3.42 0 6.42

HAE4 1 1 2 1 1 0 2

HAE5 0 1 1 1 0 0 1

MIG0 1 0 1 0 0.03 0 0.03

HUD00 4 9 13 5 7.87 0 12.87

HUD01 9 35 44 33.57 7.4 0 40.97

HUD02 41 130 171 152.89 8 1 161.89

HUD03 29 90 119 112.76 2 0 114.76

HUD04 147 121 268 261.3 4 1 266.3

HUD05 37 26 63 56.2 4 0 60.2

HUD06 36 17 53 50.6 4 0 54.6

HUD07 16 12 28 27.9 0 0 27.9

HUD08 11 2 13 13 0 0 13

HUD4T 5 0 5 2 0 0 2

Total 335 442 777 715.22 37.27 2 754.49

Grand Total 1065 1717 2782 2117.44 445.2 8.79 2571.43

Note:  This table includes the non-incorporated units that are part of the South Australian
Health Commission Central Office, the Mental Health Unit and those units under their
auspices, the South Australian Housing Trust and South Australian Community Housing
Authority, but excludes HomeStart Finance and the Parks Community Centre.



61

EXECUTIVE EMPLOYMENT: 30 JUNE 1998

Head Count FTEs

Classification Approved Male Female Untenured Tenured
Executive Positions

EXF 1 0 1 1 0

EXD 3 3 0 1 2

EXC (EL-3) 10 9 1 1 9
EXB (EL-2) 12 1 2 4 8
EXA (EL-1) 22 16 6 2 20
TOTAL 48 38 10 9 39

Note:  This table includes temporary acting arrangements due to some unfilled positions
pending the full implementation of the Department of Human Services structure.  It includes
the non-incorporated units that are part of the South Australian Health Commission Central
Office, the Mental Health Unit and those units under their auspices; the South Australian
Housing Trust and the South Australian Community Housing Authority, but excludes
HomeStart Finance and the Parks Community Centre.

During 1997-98 one incident of fraud was
identified and reported to Internal Audit and
Business Review.  This related to diversion of
money belonging to the department at one of
its district centres.  Internal procedures were
adequate to highlight the problem.  Police
have been informed and disciplinary action
has been instigated.  No changes to internal
procedures are believed to be necessary
following this incident.

The regulations of the Public Sector
Management Act are followed in respect of
known fraud and reporting of fraud.  Section
66 of the Act requires that the agency's report
to the Minister must include the number of

instances and nature of fraud detected, and
the strategies implemented to control and
prevent fraud.

An audit review of ethical standards guidance
is currently being undertaken with the
intention of ensuring that all employees are
aware of obligations related to fraudulent
activity, its detection and reporting.

FRAUD DETECTION



62

There was only one contract greater than $4
million:

Modbury Public Hospital Torrens Valley
Private Hospital Amending Agreement
19 August 1997

Key objective
  To amend agreements executed 3 

February 1995 providing for the      
management and operation by 
Healthscope of the Modbury Public 
Hospital, the Head Lease of the site of 
Modbury Public Hospital from the 
Health Commission to the Modbury 
Public Hospital Board (Board), an 
Underlease of a portion of the site of 
Modbury Public Hospital from the 
Board to Healthscope and for the 

design, construction and commissioning
of a 65 bed acute medial, surgical and 
obstetrics hospital adjacent to Modbury
Public Hospital.

Private sector participant
  Healthscope Limited

Duration
  The term of the amending agreement is 

the term of the agreement it amends: 
expires on 5 February 2010.

Assets transferred
  None

Contingent and other liabilities
  None

CONTRACTUAL
ARRANGEMENTS



63

ACCOUNT PAYMENT
PERFORMANCE

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH COMMISSION

Note:  This table includes figures for the Office of Local Government until 31 December 1997
and the figures for Planning SA for the full financial year.  The latter will be transferred to the
Department of Transport, Urban Planning and Infrastructure for the next financial year. 

Number and value of accounts paid for 1997-98

Number Value 

Paid by due date 27 221 $231 934 254
Paid late and paid 30 days or less from due date 23 056 $60 756 772
Paid late and paid more than 30 days from due date 5 291 $7 507 188

Number and value of accounts paid for 1997-98

Number Value 

Paid by due date 8 354 $165 462 170
Paid late and paid 30 days or less from due date 5 010 $18 503 824
Paid late and paid more than 30 days from due date 1 499 $5 306 608



The Department of Human Services is
assessing its exposure to the Year 2000
problem on its business functions and
services.  The  Millennium Project  was
established in 1997 to ensure that every effort
is made to minimise the impact of the
transition from 1999 to 2000 on the
department.  This project is:
  assessing critical exposures in computer 

systems, networks, operational systems, 
building management and external    
relationships;

  ensuring that all critical exposures    
identified are made ready for the      
transition well before 31 December 
1999.

The department is placing priority on those
areas assessed as having most impact on the
organisation s ability to provide its services to

the people of South Australia and on its
financial viability.  

Financial Implications
Preliminary estimates are that $18.7 million
will be spent on this program in the health
area by January 2000, however, this is subject
to a more detailed assessment of the problem.
For housing and community services, initial
estimates are that $4.2 million will be spent
on this program by July 2000, however, this
is also subject to a more detailed assessment.
Progress against Federal/State year 2000
Compliance Timeframe
The approach being adopted by the
department in addressing the year 2000
problem is consistent with guidelines
published by the State Government and
includes the following phases:

64

YEAR 2000 
COMPLIANCE

Phase Description

Inventory Determining what equipment, systems, processes and interfaces exist, 
including versions and vendor details.

Assessment Checking the systems, processes and interfaces to find out how many 
of each of these are date-sensitive and how they interrelate.

Planning Deciding which systems, processes and interfaces need to be amended 
or replaced, how these are best prioritised, and the time and resources 
required.

Correction Changing code, or replacing equipment or systems, converting data and
updating control software.

Testing and  Confirming that the equipment, systems, processes and interfaces will
implementation operate before, during and after the transition to 2000.

Contingency Developing further plans to cater for unexpected problems and for   
planning managing the less critical exposures identified but not fixed in time.



Year 2000 Exposure and Risk
Management

Project managers and project teams are in
place across the department.  Formal
reporting mechanisms are being developed,
and monthly reports to Year 2000 South
Australia are being submitted, as required of
all government agencies.  

In the housing area of the department, focus
is on clearly identifying exposures to critical
business systems which rely on mainframe
computing infrastructure.

Community services has reached Year 2000
compliance in critical mainframe systems
through Justice Information Systems testing.
For those aspects of the Year 2000 problem
that may affect building management and
environmental control systems, non-
mainframe computer systems and

miscellaneous equipment across community
services, housing and corporate services
groups, compliance planning is still being
completed.  

The health sector is focusing on identifying
risks to critical items of biomedical
engineering equipment, building services,
mainframe and mid-range applications and
personal computers.  Letters were sent to over
8000 service providers, manufacturers and
vendors of systems and equipment to
determine compliance and to assess risk
levels.  To date about 25% had responded
before June 1998.  Health units are planning
for known exposures, and plans will not be
completed until more information is provided
by vendors and manufacturers.  

The following table shows progress in the
health area of the department against
established government timeframes:

65

Federal/State Requirement % Progress Estimated
Deadlines against Completion 

Requirement Date
at 30 June 1998

December 1998 Correction of critical items completed 10% September 1999

March 1999 Correction of non-critical items completed 12% June 1999

June 1999 Testing of critical items completed 15% September 1999

June 1999 Development of contingency plans 2% June 1999
completed

September 1999 Testing of non-critical items completed 15% September 1999

Federal/State Requirement % Progress Estimated
Deadlines against Completion 

Requirement Date
at 30 June 1998

December 1998 Correction of critical items completed 30% April 1999

March 1999 Correction of non-critical items completed 0% May 1999

June 1999 Testing of critical items completed 10% August 1999

June 1999 Development of contingency plans 0% June 1999
completed

September 1999 Testing of non-critical items completed 0% September 1999

The following table shows progress in the housing and community services areas of the
department against established Government timeframes.



Critical exposure

The table below identifies the critical exposures identified in health to date and the planned
strategy to redress the risk.  The estimated completion date indicates the expected time frame
for the implementation of the corrected system.  Ongoing work to finalise the assessment in
some areas may result in additional items being added to the list.  The table excludes those
items which have been deemed to be Year 2000 ready but subject to confirmation through
compliance testing.

66

Description of Exposure Planned Correction Correction  
Strategy Estimated

Completion Date

Health

Pharmacy System: Royal Adelaide Hospital Replace system June 1999

Pharmacy System: Flinders Medical Centre Replace system June 1999

Patient Management System: Replace system June 1999
Repatriation General Hospital

Patient Management System: SA Dental Service Replace system June 1999

Building Management System: Modbury Hospital Replace system June 1999

Building Management System: Replace system June 1999
DHS Citi Centre Building

Building Management System: Replace system June 1999
Flinders Medical Centre

Building Management System: Replace system June 1999
Queen Elizabeth Hospital
Epidemiology System: Replace system June 1999
Public and Environmental Health

Country health units: PABXs Replace non-compliant June 1999
PABXs

Corporate applications With vendors, test and September 1999
implement required 
changes

Non-critical exposures and remediation strategies will be documented for the health sector for
all other aspects of the Year 2000 problem on completion of current assessment work.

The following table identifies the critical exposures identified to date in the housing area of the
department and the planned strategy to redress the risk.  The estimated completion date
indicates the expected time frame for implementing the corrected system.  Ongoing work to
finalise the assessment in some areas may result in additional items being added to the list.
The table excludes those items that have been deemed to be Year 2000 compliant but are still
subject to confirmation through compliance testing.



67

Description of Exposure Planned Correction Correction  
Strategy Estimated

Completion Date

Housing

Customer service and property based systems: June 1999

Capital works Retire December 1998

Customer Information System (CIS) Replace (CAIS March 1999
Common Registration)
Replace (CAIS Waiting March 1999
List Management)

Council and water rates Convert (pilot) February 1998
Property maintenance Convert October 1998

Property/land information Convert August 1998

House sales Convert October 1998

Rent management Convert March 1999

Direct payments Convert November 1998

Client deductions Convert February 1999

Information expert Upgrade (vendor supplied) August 1998
Telephone voice response system Contact supplier June 1999

Administrative and building management systems:

Concept HR Coordinate upgrade  June 1999
through DAIS/OCPE

OfficeVision (IBM) Retire through roll out June 1999
of standard operating 
environment.

Building security Replace (proximity June 1999
badge readers)

Non-critical exposures and remediation strategies will be documented for community services,
housing and corporate services groups for other aspects of the Year 2000 problem on
completion of current inventory and assessment work.



68

Consultancies $10 000 to $50 000
Health Consultant $
Essential Trace Element Dr RA Goyer 10000
Disability Services-Infrastructure Aspect Computing 10 500
Trendstar Education Michell and Assoc Health Care Service 13 200
Ambulatory Care Project KPMG Management Consulting 13 500
Best Practice Conference C Gaston 14 000
Health Plus -OACIS Interface KPMG 15 600
Management Inform Systems Program Computer Power 15 900
Hospital Separation Analysis Milliman and Robertson1 5 955
Casemix SOYM Ernst and Young 16 640
Health Logistics Strategy Coopers and Lybrand 16 800
Clinical Resource Management Dr A Rosenstein 18 146
CAM Restructure Health Management Solutions 19 575
Ambulatory Care Obstetric Program University of Adelaide  20 000
Intranet Internet Consult Services Network 20 500
Clarification of community values Gavin Mooney 20 847
Review director of nursing positions Cullen Egan Dell / Dr PJ Brennan 21 501
Priority setting METRO hospitals Gavin Mooney 22 194
Palliative Care Purchasing Plan AD Loan and Associates PL 23 259
Large Country Hospital Information  KPMG 23 400
Systems Business Case
Public Health Legislation Review Chris Reynolds 23 500
Total Health Network Dallas Ariotti 24 397
Migrant Health Consultancy Beckman and Associates 24 843
Health Plus -Remote Access Medical Comm Aust 25 000
HP-Health Services &amp; Regions projects Helen Radoslovich &amp; Associates 26 445
Nurse Workforce Modelling Rawinski Management 27 000
Community Health Services IT Infrastructure CSC Aust 28 600
HIPP Program Sheena D'Angelo 30 000
Clinical Costing Health Tech PL and Others 31 543
P&amp;EHS IT Strategic Plan Ernst and Young 32 162
Advice on corporations Arthur Andersen 32 500
Trendstar P J Power Consulting 32 830
Development of Strategies to Chemically Bin CSIRO Land &amp; Water 34 050
Lead In Household Dust
Tobacco Litigation Johnston Withers 35 000
Pharmacy Business Case Computer Power 37 194
SA HealthPlus Project Management KPMG      37 200
SA HealthPlus Information Scoping Project Flinders University of SA 39 000
National Costing Project K Mazzoleni / Health Tech 42 300
Total 37 895 081

Consultancies $10 000 to $50 000
Total 21 $1 592 208

EXTERNAL CONSULTANCIES



69

Housing Consultant $
Risk Management Presentation to Executive Dr S Gray of Broadleaf Capital   10 790
Management Forum International Pty Ltd
Preparation of Consultancy Reports for the PKF Securities 21 700
Working Group on Cemeteries
Preparation for the Announcement of the New KPMG Management Consulting 35 908
Management Responsibilities for DHS

Total 3 68 398

Community Services Consultant $
Professional Appraisal and Career Guidance Leadership Solutions 10 372
Business Case Preparation Intech Consulting Group 10 450
Financial Analysis AD Loan &amp; Associates    11 000
Manual Handling Training Nery Ergonomics 11 083
Self Help Research Study Flinders University of SA 13 000
Training in Mental Health Social Options Australia 13 560
Frail Aged and Homeless Anglicare SA 14 000
Evaluation of Framework for Alternative Care Coopers and Lybrand 14 025
Premature Ageing in SA Aboriginal Population Faculty of Aboriginal and Islander 14 250

Studies, University of SA
SAAP Pilot for Challenging Behaviours Training Centre of Personal Education Inc 15 000
New Health Management Services User Rights Reference Group 15 643
Dealing with Violent Clients Training Achievement Training 15 695
Competency Standards/Management Development Oz Train/John Morris 18 000
Review of Role of Property Management Unit Ernst and Young 18 550
Public Relations Michells Warren 19 511
Training Records Database JC Ware 20 200
Preparation of FACS 23/10/97 Financial Statements Ernst and Young 24 750
Alternative Care and Family Preservation for Community Business Bureau 27 520 
Aboriginal Clients
Day Activity Implementation Schools of Occupational Therapy,  29 750

University of SA
Ageing Statistics Centre for Ageing Studies 32 500
GRF Models of Therapeutic Counselling for Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council 35 000
Aboriginal Communities
Review of Respite Services Elliot Stanford &amp; Associates 37 500
Study of Attitudes to Ageing Across Cultures Kate Barnett &amp; Associates 48 000
&amp; Generations

Total 23 469 359

Total Consultancies $10 001 to $50 000 63 1 432 838



70

Consultancies over $50 000
Health Consultant $
Strategic Communications (notes 1, 2 and 3) DDB Needham 110 314

Davies, Hutchens and Blackburn 28 312
Allied Health Computer Power 51 698
Casemix Funding Mode Casefund Consulting P L 51 990
Trendstar Post Implementation Review Brewerton and Associates 61 500
YEAR 2000 Co-ordination KPMG Consult 63 360
IT Strategic Plan Project - SAMHS &amp; CAMHS Aspect Computing 64 238
Information Resource Management Computer Power 73 995
Market Survey McGregor Marketing 82 564
Health Plus Business Plan Andersen Consulting1 26 767
SA HealthPlus Information Scoping Project Coded Inform P/L 142 927
Clinical Costing HealthTech P L 173 025
SA HealthPlus Coordinated Care Flinders Consulting 360 000
Costing outpatients shortlist Coopers &amp; Lybrand 576 500

Total 14 1 967 190

Housing Consultant $
Review of Ownership of Housing Trust Stock Beston Pacific Corporation Ltd 51 000
Recruitment of Executive Positions Cooper and Lybrand Consultants 53 000
HR Development Support Taylor Management Consulting 62 250
Department of Human Services Financial Ernst &amp; Young 224 008
Systems Consultancy

Total 4                                         390 258

Community Services Consultant $
Review Structure and Staffing of Finance Branch Performance and Audit Review 50 453
Evaluation of Coordinated Care Trials Paul Laris 55 000
Evaluation of SAAP in SA Elliot Stanford &amp; Associates 55 000
Management Team Development Jill Gael and Associates 62 854
SAAP Boarding House Kenwyn Consulting Services Pty Ltd 90 000
1990s Major Changes in Economic Terms for Retired Centre for Ageing Studies, 93 800 
Persons; Productive Ageing of South Australia Flinders University
HACC Workforce Planning and Development Community Services and Health 94  447

Industry Training Advisory Board
Preparation of FACS 1996-97 Financial Statements Ernst and Young 186 302
and Review Financial Processes

Total 8 687 856

Total DHS Consultancies over $50 000 26 3 045 304

TOTAL CONSULTANTS PAID TO 30 JUNE 1998: 210 (note 4) 6 070 350



Information Statement
The Freedom of Information (FOI) Act 1991
gives members of the public a legally
enforceable right to access information held
by the South Australian Government, subject
to certain restrictions.

Structure and functions of the
Department of Human Services
The structure and functions of the
department, including the various divisions of
Central Office which report to the
department s Chief Executive, are shown at
the front of this report and provide an
overview of the reporting lines of
responsibility.  Departmental direction is also
influenced by the input of advisory boards
and committees.

Ways in which the functions of the
department affect members of the public
The department s work directly impacts on
the public in the areas of health, community
services and housing planning, strategy
development, major projects and library
services.

Other work such as policy development and
information technology has an impact on the
public once it has been  implemented by the
relevant agencies, for example, the SA
Housing Trust, SA Community Housing
Authority, hospitals and health centres, which
are themselves separate FOI agencies.

Public participation 
There are a number of avenues through which
the public can contribute to policy
development in the department.

The department uses external expertise and
policy advice through statutory and non-
statutory advisory committees, which are
comprised of both government and non-
government representatives.  Advice is taken
from peak non-government organisations and
additionally a consultative process is under-
taken in the formulation of development,
planning, and policy.  The department
consults with major consumer groups,
circulates discussion papers, calls for
submissions on particular topics, and
convenes public meetings in metropolitan and
country areas.

Documents held by Central Office
The department holds a number of health,
community services, and housing
publications, including administrative and
client files, books, discussion and background
papers, reports, reviews, serial publications,
codes of practice, surveys, guidelines,
policies, programs, strategies, directories,
evaluations, needs assessments and
proposals.  Other documents held within
central office include procedure manuals,
administrative circulars on general
management, finance, staffing, plant and
equipment,property, motor vehicles and
industrial circulars.

71

Note 1: This consultancy was assigned to Davies Hutchins and Blackburn commencing 
January 1998.

Note 2: The major project undertaken by DDB Needham was for SA Coordinated Care - 
SA HealthPlus ($73 304).

Note 3: The major project undertaken by Davis, Hutchins and Blackburn was for SA 
Coordinated Care - SA HealthPlus ($13 312).

Note 4: Totals may be affected by rounding.

FREEDOM OF 
INFORMATION



Major health and community services
publications for the year are listed in next part
of this report.  These documents are available
for inspection in the health and Family and
Youth Services libraries during business
hours.

The department s libraries also keep
information as to where health, FAYS, and
housing publications are held and whether or
not they are free, for sale, or for inspection -
most of the documents listed can be seen in
the libraries, and may be photocopied at a
moderate cost per page.

The addresses of the departmental libraries
are:

Health and Family and Youth Services:
3rd floor, Citi Centre
11-13 Hindmarsh Square
ADELAIDE  SA  5000
Tel: (08) 8226 6071
Fax: (08) 8226 6677

Housing:
1st floor, Roma Mitchell House
136 North Terrace
ADELAIDE  SA  5000
Tel: (08) 8303 0610
Fax: (08) 8303 0611

The Health Promotion Unit has a small range
of anti-smoking stickers, leaflets and
information sheets available free and can be
contacted on (08) 8226 6329.

The constitutions of hospitals and health
centres incorporated under the South
Australian Health Commission Act 1976 may
be inspected in the Legal Services Branch,
10th floor, 11-13 Hindmarsh Square, Adelaide
(08 82266178).

Arrangements and procedures for seeking
access to records 

Applications for access to or amendment of
Department of Human Services documents
should be addressed to:

Freedom of Information Liaison Officer 
Department of Human Services
10th floor, Citi Centre
11-13 Hindmarsh Square
ADELAIDE  SA  5000
Tel: (08) 8226 6178

Applications for access to or amendment of
Family and Youth Services documents should
be addressed to:

Freedom of Information Liaison Officer
(FAYS)
Department of Human Services
1st floor, Citi Centre
11-13 Hindmarsh Square
ADELAIDE  SA  5000
Tel: (08) 8226 6707

72



Aboriginal Health
The first step: South Australian Aboriginal health regional plans / South Australian Aboriginal

Health Partnership.  Dulwich, SA: the South Australian Aboriginal Health Partnership, 
1998.

Aged
Moving ahead: the development of a strategic plan for health and community services for 

older people / the Purchasing Office, South Australian Health Commission in partnership 
with the Office for the Ageing.  Adelaide: Department of Human Services, 1998.

Promoting non drug strategies for older people / by Tammy LeBlanc.  Adelaide: South 
Australian Health Commission, 1998.

Ambulatory Care
Ambulatory care: reform program: a report of the research and analysis into Ambulatory 

Health Care Services conducted in South Australia 1995-1997 / Meryl Horsell, Sue 
McKechnie.  Adelaide: Ambulatory Care Unit, South Australian Health Commission, 
1997.

Ambulatory care: reform program: research projects executive summaries: attached volume / 
Ambulatory Care Unit, Purchasing Office South Australian Health Commission.  
Adelaide: Ambulatory Care Unit, South Australian Health Commission, 1997.

Child Protection
Child Protection in South Australia: a new approach / Family and Community Services, 

October, 1997.
Commitments in Care  A Charter for Children and Young People in Care / Joint Venture 

between Future Echoes, The Office for Families and Children and The Department for 
Family and Community Services, July 1997.

Community Health Services
Evaluation of one-to-one services: a literature review / Soi Yeng Lewis.  Adelaide: South 

Australian Community Health Research Unit, 1997.
Obtaining and using feedback from service-users in women s and community health services.

Adelaide: South Australian Community Health Research Unit, 1997.
Innovative health services for homeless youth program: evaluation report / Donna Chung and 

Frank Tesoriero.  Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission, 1997.

Communicable Diseases
Infectious and notifiable diseases in South Australia: Annual Summary 1995 / Adelaide: 

Communicable Disease Control Unit, South Australian Health Commission, 1998.

Environmental Health
Aluminium: report of an international meeting 20-21 April 1995, Brisbane / edited by Paula 

Imray .{et al.} Revised ed.  National Environmental Health Forum monographs.  Metal 
series no.  1.  Adelaide: National Environmental Health Forum, 1998.

73

PUBLICATIONS
1997-98



Exposure scenarios and exposure settings / Roscoe Taylor and Andrew Langley.  2nd ed.  
National Environmental Health Forum monographs.  Soil series no.  2.  Adelaide: 
National Environmental Health Forum, 1998.

Guidance on the use of rainwater tanks / David A. Cunliffe.  National Environmental Health 
Forum monographs.  Water series no.  3.  Adelaide: National Environmental Health 
Forum, 1998.

The health risk assessment and management of contaminated sites: proceedings of the Fourth
National Workshop on the Health Risk Assessment and Management of Contaminated Sites / 

editors A.  Langley ...{et al.} Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission, 1997.
Nitrogen dioxide / Len Ferrari.  National Environmental Health Forum monographs.  Air series

no.  3.  Adelaide: National Environmental Health Forum, 1997.
Paint film components / M.  Van Alphen.  National Environmental Health Forum monographs.

General series no.  2.  Adelaide: National Environmental Health Forum, 1998.  
Pesticide use in schools and school grounds / Kevin J.  Buckett and Peter N. Di Marco.  

National Environmental Health Forum monographs.  General series no.  1.  Adelaide: 
National Environmental Health Forum, 1997.

Foster Care
Fostering: The Future / Policy and Development Division, Family and Community Services, 

Research Paper 1997.

Health Promotion
Making the move: towards health promoting hospitals, health services and regions / Helen 

Radoslovich and Kate Barnett.  Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission, 1998.

Health Surveys
The South Australian survey of disability prevalence, November- February 1997: conducted for

the Disability Service Office, South Australian Health Commission / Anne Taylor ...{et 
al.} Adelaide: SERCIS, Behavioural Epidemiology Unit, Epidemiology Branch, South 
Australian Health Commission, 1997.

HIV/AIDS
South Australian HIV/AIDS Strategy 1997-1999 / South Australian Health Commission, Public

and Environmental Health Service, HIV/AIDS and Related Programs Unit.  Adelaide: 
South Australian Health Commission, 1997.

Maternal Health Services
Pregnancy outcome in South Australia 1996 / Annabelle Chan ...{et al.} Adelaide: Pregnancy 

Outcome Unit, 1997.

Medical Care
Clinical pathways development in acute care / Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission,

1997.

Mental Health Services
Mental health status of South Australians: October 1997 / Anne Taylor, Eleonora Dal Grande, 

Jacqueline Parsons.  Adelaide, SA: SERCIS, Behavioural Epidemiology Unit, 
Epidemiology Branch, South Australian Health Commission, 1997.

Migrant Health
Migrant health survey, October 1996 - February 1997 / conducted for the Migrant Health 

Service, SA Health Commission, Anne Taylor et al.  Adelaide: SERCIS, Behavioural 
Epidemiology Unit, Epidemiology Branch, South Australian Health Commission, 1997.

74



Nursing
Profile of the registered and enrolled nurse workforce, South Australia 1995 / prepared by 

Edward Rawinski.  Adelaide: Nurses Board of South Australia and South Australian 
Health Commission, 1997.

Palliative Care
Report to parliament on the care of people who are dying in South Australia / Geraldine 

Sladden.  Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission, 1997.

Primary Health Care
Preparing the ground for healthy communities manual: a new approach to workforce planning 

and development in primary health care / by Angela May ...{et al.} for the Rural Health 
Training Unit.  Adelaide: Rural Health Training Unit, South Australian Health 
Commission, 1997.

Public Health
Focus on wellbeing in schools / compiled by Annegret Lackmann.  Adelaide: Wellbeing 

Project, Enfield Community Centre and Adelaide Central Community Health Services, 
1997.

Food Act Report year ending 30th June 1997.  Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission,
1997.  

Guidelines on food labelling / South Australian Health Commission.  8th ed.  Adelaide: The 
Commission, 1997.

Strategic Directions for health: progress report 1997.  Adelaide, SA: South Australian Health 
Commission, 1997.

Transport and health: accessing the impact / Beverly Clarke.  Adelaide: South Australian 
Community Health Research Unit, 1998.

Rural Health Services
Clinical and admitting privileges in SA rural public hospitals.  Adelaide: South Australian 

Health Commission, 1997.
Diversity makes a difference: findings of the Hills Mallee Southern Regional Health Needs 

Assessment Project / Hills Mallee Southern Regional Health Service {prepared by 
Michael Bentley}.  Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission, 1997.

Midwifery workforce report: a report of the recruitment and retention of midwives in 
rural/remote South Australia / prepared by Pauline Kearns.  North Adelaide, SA: Rural 
Health Training Unit, South Australian Health Commission, 1997.

We could fly: improving services for adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse in rural South 
Australia, Hills Mallee Southern Region / Rosie King.  Adelaide: South Australian Health
Commission, 1998.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Sexually transmitted diseases in South Australia in 1997.  Epidemiologic report no. 11 

Adelaide: South Australia, Department. of Human Services, Public and Environmental 
Health Service, 1998.

Small Business
Small business charter : a state government initiative for small business / South Australian 

Health Commission.  Adelaide: South Australian Health Commission, 1997.

75



Statistics
Eleventh report of the maternal, perinatal and infant mortality committee on maternal,      

perinatal and post-neonatal deaths in 1996.  Adelaide: South Australian Health 
Commission, 1997.

Epidemiology of cancer in South Australia: incidence, mortality and survival 1977 to 1996, 
incidence and mortality 1996.  Adelaide: South Australian Cancer Registry, 1997.

Women s Health
Expanding possibilities: an alternative approach to working with women who experience the 

effects of depression.  Written by Aerrin Morgan.  Adelaide, SA: South Australian Health
Commission, 1997.

Just health for rural women: evaluation of Phase 2 (1993/94-1996/97) National Women s 
Health Program / Report prepared by Kate Barnett and Helen Radoslovich.  Adelaide, 
SA: National Women s Health Program: South Australian Health Commission, 1997.

76



77

FINANCIAL STATEM
ENTS

FINANCIAL 
STATEMENTS



Notes:
1. Inter-entity transactions have not been 

eliminated in this simplified               
presentation.

2. 1996-97 comparative figures have been 
estimated due to organisational changes
in the activities formerly undertaken by 
the former Department of Housing and 
Urban Development

3. The Department of Human Services  
figures reflect the full year costs of 
operation of the department.

4. Funding provided to health units and 
the housing sector for capital purposes 
have been recorded under operational 
costs of the Health Commission and 
Department of Human Services in 
accordance with the accounting       
practices established for the Annual 
Financial Statements Department of 
Human Services and Health 
Commission Chief Entity.  Capital 
spending totalled $3.7 million in 
1997-98 ($6.4 million for 1996-97).

The following financial statements present the
operational costs of the SA Health
Commission  Chief Entity  and the
Department of Human Services at 30 June
1998.  

The Health Commission  chief entity  report
presents the financial affairs of the corporate
and health service related functions of the
Commission and those financial affairs
relating to certain Unincorporated Health
Service Units, notably:
  South Australian Health Commission    

functions including:
  Corporate Policy, Planning and 

Administration
  Public and Environmental Health 

Service
  Unincorporated Health Service 

Units  
  Management Assessment Panel
  Office of the Public Advocate

  Guardianship Board
  Mental Health Services
  Rural Health Training Unit
  Migrant Health
  Adult Physiological and 

Neurological Option Co-ordination
Agency

  Brain Injury Option Co-ordination 
Agency.

The Department of Human Services was
created by the amalgamation of the former
Department of Housing and Urban
Development, including Policy and
Corporate/Business Services divisions (but
excluding the Urban Planning function) and
the Department for Family and Community
Services.

The following table presents a summary of
the operating expenditure of the combined
Human Services and Health Commission
functions.

78

DEPARTMENT OF 
HUMAN SERVICES
for the period 24 October
1997 to 30 June 1998

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

South Australian Department of 1996-97 1997-98
Health Commission Human Services Total $m Total $m

Operational 1641.9 381.7 2023.6 1868.3
Expenses

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79

Note 30/06/1998
$'000

Operating Expenses
Employee related 57 528
Supplies and services 29 592
Grants &amp; subsidies 125 087
Client payments 6 607
Depreciation 3 750

Total Operating Expenses 3 222 564

Operating Revenue
Rent, fees and charges 4 27 103
Interest 2 110 
Dividends - HomeStart Finance 5 000 
Other 5 271 

Total Operating Revenue 39 484 

Net Cost of Services  183 080

Government Revenues
Department Appropriation 5 94 167 
Commonwealth grants 6 81 496 
Other grants &amp; contributions  112

Total Revenues from Government  175 775

Net Revenues from Disposalof Non-Current Assets 407

Change in Net Assets Before Restructuring (6 898)
Net Revenues From Restructuring 7 67 147

Change in Net Assets After Restructuring  60 249

The Operating Statement is to be read in conjunction with the notes to and forming
part of the Financial Statements.

DEPARTMENT OF
HUMAN SERVICES
OPERATING 
STATEMENT
for the period 23 october 1997
to 30 June 1998

Departm
ent of Hum

an Services
fo

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ctober 1997

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e 1998



80

Note 30/06/1998
$'000

CURRENT ASSETS
Cash on hand and deposit accounts 13(a) 57 052 
Receivables 8 15 404 
Other 401  

72 857

NON-CURRENT ASSETS
Capital works in progress 66
Property, plant and equipment 9 48 677  

48 743 

TOTAL ASSETS 121 600 

CURRENT LIABILITIES
Payables 10 18 132 
Employee entitlements and related provisions 11 14 359 
Borrowings 12 351 
Other 53  

32 895

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
Employee entitlements and related provisions 11 28 171 
Borrowings 12 285  

28 456 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 61 351 

TOTAL NET ASSETS 60 249 

EQUITY
Asset revaluation reserve 192 
Accumulated surplus 60 057 

TOTAL EQUITY 60 249 

The Statement of Financial Position is to be read in conjunction with the notes to
and forming part of the Financial Statements.

DEPARTMENT OF
HUMAN SERVICES
STATEMENT OF 
FINANCIAL POSITION
as at 30 June 1998

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Note 30/06/1998
Inflows (Outflows)

$'000
Cash flows from Operating Activities

Payments
Employee related (51 205)
Supplies &amp; services (24 521)
Grants to organisations (181 966)
Client payments  (6 607)

Receipts
Rent, fees and charges   24 258 
Dividends - HomeStart 5 000 
Interest 3 663 
Other 5 788 

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities 13(b) (225 590)
Cash Flows from Investing Activities

Purchase of property, plant &amp; equipment (796)
Proceeds from sale of property, plant &amp; equipment 2 679 
Net Cash Flows from Investing Activities 1 883

Cash flows from Government
State Government 153 182 
Commonwealth Government  92 903 

Cash flows provided by Government 246 085

Cash flows from restructure  34 674 

Net increase (decrease) in cash held  57 052 
Cash at the beginning of the reporting period -

Cash at the end of the reporting period 13(a) 57 052 

The Statement of Cash Flows is to be read in conjunction with the notes to and
forming part of the Financial Statements

DEPARTMENT OF
HUMAN SERVICES
STATEMENT OF 
CASHFLOWS
for the period 23 october 1997
to 30 June 1998

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82

1. Creation of the Department
(a) Objectives and funding
The Department of Human Services was cre-
ated by proclamation dated 23 October 1997
as an Administrative Unit under the Public
Sector Management Act 1995. 

On 23 October 1997 the Department for
Family and Community Services (FACS) and
the Department of Housing and Urban
Development (DHUD) were abolished.  On
that date staff, functions, assets and liabilities
of these abolished agencies (excluding urban
planning and local government functions of
DHUD) were transferred to the newly
established Department of Human Services.

The department is charged with broad ranging
policy and certain responsibilities for health,
housing and support and protection of people
as members of families and communities.

The department performs a coordinating role
for the Ministerial Portfolio of Human
Services.  Key features of the structural
arrangements for the department and the
portfolio are:
  Promotion of integrated corporate     

support arrangements for the South 
Australian Health Commission, South 
Australian Housing Trust and the   
department;

  continued separation between funding 
/planning and provider roles for health 
and housing, and arrangements for   
family and youth services;

  separate operational focus on        
metropolitan and country communities 

as well as on sectors and issues of state-
wide significance;

  continued strategic policy focus on 
health, housing, ageing, disability,    
families and children, and Aboriginal 
people; and

  accountability for financial management,
business services and capital asset   
management of the portfolio.

The department is predominantly funded by
Parliamentary appropriations.  It provides the
following services on a fee-for-service basis
for portfolio entities:
  Information technology development 

and facilities management for the 
Housing Trust;

  Human Resources and Human Resource 
management for the South Australian 
Health Commission, the South 
Australian Housing Trust and the South 
Australian Community Housing 
Authority;

  Management of the central office 
accommodation in respect of the South 
Australian Health Commission, the 
South Australian Housing Trust and 
South Australian Community Housing 
Authority.

The fees charged are determined at cost and
represent in the main, the recovery of wages
and salaries and related benefits paid to
employees and the recovery of expenditure
incurred in relation to the management of the
central office accommodation of the portfolio
entities.

DEPARTMENT OF 
HUMAN SERVICES
NOTES TO AND PART OF
THE FINANCIAL 
STATEMENT
for the year ended 30 June 1998

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The financial report encompasses special
deposit accounts and all Funds through which
the department controls resources to carry on
its functions.

(b) Portfolio Staffing Restructure
By proclamation under section 7 of the Public
Sector Management Act 1995, effective from
25 April 1998, the Government incorporated a
number of public sector employees into the
Department of Human Services.

The public sector employees affected by the
proclamation included:
  all public sector employees of the South 

Australian Health Commission, with 
some exceptions eg the Chief Executive 
Officer and the Deputy Chief Executive 
Officer of the Commission;

  all public sector employees of the South 
Australian Housing Trust; and

  all public sector employees of the South 
Australian Community Housing 
Authority

employed prior to the effective date of 25
April 1998.

The proclamation did not affect those
employees who at the effective date were
employed on an hourly, daily, weekly or
piece-work basis, or officers and employees
of an incorporated hospital or health centre
under the South Australian Health
Commission Act 1976.

2. Statement of Accounting 
Policies

The significant Accounting Policies which
have been adopted in the preparation of these
financial statements are:

(a) Basis of preparation of the Financial 
Statements

The Financial Statements are a general
purpose financial report and have been
prepared in accordance with the requirements
of the Statements of Accounting Concepts,
applicable Accounting Standards, the
Treasurer s Instructions and applicable
Accounting Policy Statements issued pursuant
to the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987. 

The accrual basis of accounting has been
employed on the basis of historical cost and
does not take into account changing money
values or, except where stated, current
valuations of non-current assets.

(b) Revenue recognition
Rent, fees and charges
Service fee income comprises revenue earned
from the provision of services to entities
external to the department.  The revenue is
recognised when the fee in respect of services
provided is receivable.

Dividends
Dividends are received by the department
from HomeStart Finance in compliance with
section 26(8) of the Housing and Urban
Development (Administrative Arrangements)
Act 1995 and redistributed to portfolio entities
consistent with department strategic plans.
Revenue is recognised upon agreement by the
Minister to the dividend proposed by the
HomeStart Board.

Government Revenues
General appropriation, Housing Assistance
grants and Deposit 5000 Scheme grants are
recognised when payments are received in the
department s operating account at Treasury.
Tax Equivalent Regime and other grants are
recognised when they are due and receivable.

(c) Grants and subsidies
The department provides grant monies to
certain community organisations which are
subject to a requirement that monies
unexpended at year end or at the end of the
grant period are repayable unless specific
authority is obtained to carry funds forward
into the next financial year or grant period.

The department has not conducted a balance
day confirmation process with external parties
to determine what unexpended monies should
be repaid and consequently no receivable has
been recognised in the accounts in relation to
these funds. 

(d) Employee Entitlements and Related
Provisions

Provision is made for the department's
liability for employee entitlements arising
from services rendered by employees to

83

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balance date.  Employee entitlements
expected to be settled within one year have
been measured at their nominal amount.
Other employee entitlements payable later
than one year have been measured at the
present value of the estimated future cash out-
flows to be made for those entitlements.

A superannuation oncost has been provided
for against provisions for annual leave and
that portion of the provision for long service
leave which it is estimated will be taken as
leave.  The oncost has been applied based on
the average of employer contribution rates.
Other employee related provisions represent
oncosts consisting of workers compensation
premiums and payroll tax.  These oncosts
have been calculated by applying their
corresponding levied rates to employee
entitlements. 

No provision is made for sick leave because
entitlements do not vest in the employee and
because of the material uncertainty which
precludes reliable estimation of future usage
of sick leave by department employees.

(e) Property, Plant and Equipment
Freehold land and buildings comprising a
class of non-current assets are revalued on a
progressive basis over a three year period.
The basis of valuation is either using the
deprival method or market rents method
depending on the nature of the land and
buildings subject to valuation.  
All non-current assets having a limited useful
life are systematically depreciated over their
useful lives in a manner which reflects the
consumption of their service potential Items
of plant and equipment with an individual
value of less than $5 000 are expensed upon
acquisition.  

Depreciation is provided for on a straight line
balance basis, with the following depreciation
periods:

Computer equipment 3 years
Office equipment 5-10 years
Plant and Machinery 5-10 years
Buildings 15-60 years

(f) Work in Progress
The department incurs capital works in
providing care facilities.  To the extent that
these  capital works are physically incomplete
as at balance date the value of work
completed is included in work in progress.
Work in progress is recorded at the lower of
cost or estimated final project value.
(g) Leased Assets
The department has entered into a number of
operating lease agreements for buildings  and
office equipment where the lessors effectively
retain all of the risks and benefits incident to
ownership of the items held under the
operating leases. Equal instalments of the
lease payments are charged to the operating
statement over the lease term as this is
representative of the pattern of benefits to be
derived from the leased property. 

(h) Tax Status
The activities of the department are exempt
from Commonwealth income tax but other
Commonwealth taxes such as fringe benefits
tax and other State taxes including payroll tax
are applicable.

(i) Comparative Figures
The department is a newly formed entity
established on the 23 October 1997 and hence
no comparative figures are available.

84

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30/06/1998
$'000

EMPLOYEE RELATED:
Salaries and wages 44 619 
Long service leave and annual leave 2 832 
Superannuation and retiring allowances 3 941 
Workers compensation 4 298 
Payroll tax 854 
Other employee related expenses 984 

Total employee related expenses 57 528 

SUPPLIES AND SERVICES:
Advertising 75 
Departmental accommodation 5 878 
Property related 1 979 
Consultant  fees 1 054 
Contractors &amp; agency staff 2 753 
Amounts paid or payable for audit services to Auditor General of South Australia: 80
Finance costs 6 
Printing  publications and stationery 991 
Communication and computing 9 724 
Equipment expenses 1 153 
Vehicle expenses 1 080 
Travel expenses 535 
Client related expenses 1 103 
Seminars, courses and training 124 
Other administration expenses 3 057 

Total supplies and services 29 592

GRANTS:
Home and community care 32 080 
Supported accommodation assistance 9 997 
Family and community development grants 3 382 
Non government agency grants 4 124 
Domestic violence rural and remote 165 
Funds for seniors 631 
Housing Assistance grants 67 395 
Deposit 5000 Scheme 2 138 
SA Housing Trust - Tax Equivalent Regime 2 517 
Parks Community Centre - Community Cultural Recreation Centre 1 594
Various other grants 1 064 

Total grants 125 087 

CLIENT PAYMENTS:
Children s payments 4 831 
Emergency financial assistance 1 426 
Funerals 350 

Total client payments 6 607 

DEPRECIATION:
Plant and equipment 2 618 
Buildings 1 132 

Total depreciation 3 750 

Total Operating Expenses 222 564 

85

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86

4. Rent, Fees and Charges
30/06/1998

$'000
Rent 770 
Business Services 13 793 
Employee services (1) 12 540 

27 103 

(1) Represents the recovery of costs for the provision of employee related services to 
the South Australian Health Commission, South Australian Housing Trust and the 
South Australian Community Housing Authority for the period 25/4/98 to 30/6/98.

5. Departmental Appropriation
30/06/1998

$'000
Tax Equivalent Regime reimbursement - SA Housing Trust 2 076 
Tax Equivalent Regime reimbursement - HomeStart Finance 3 132 
State Housing Assistance Funds 23 138 
General Appropriation 65 821 

94 167 

6. Commonwealth Grants
30/06/1998

$'000
Home and community care 22 172 
Supported accommodation assistance 8 551 
Domestic violence rural and remote 87 
Community development 1 800 
Housing assistance 46 593 
Other 2 293 

81 496 

7. Net Revenues from Restructuring
With effect from 23 October 1997 the Department of Housing and Urban Development 
and the Department for Family and Community services were abolished.  The functions, 
together with the assets and liabilities of the abolished departments, with the exception of
the former Planning Division of  the Department of Housing and Urban Development, 
were transferred to the newly established Department of Human Services as follows:

Facs Dhud 30/06/1998
$ 000 $ 000 $ 000

Current Assets
Cash on hand and deposit accounts 15 929 18 745 34 674
Receivables 1 955 82 884 84 839
Other 470 233 703

Non-Current Assets
Receivables - 1 075 1 075
Capital works in progress 45   - 45 
Property, plant and equipment 32 576 20 895  53 471 

Total Assets 50 975 123 832  174 807

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Facs Dhud 30/06/1998
$ 000 $ 000 $ 000

Current Liabilities
Payables 1 659 69 010  70 669
Employee entitlements and related provisions 4 886 630 5 516 
Borrowings - 421  421 

Non-Current Liabilities
Employee entitlements and related provision 10 932  1 526  12 458 
Borrowings 265 221  486 

Total Liabilities 17 742 71 808   89 550 

Net Assets 33 233 52 024 85 257 

With effect from 25 April 1998 employees of the South Australian Housing Trust, South
Australian Community Housing Authority and the South Australian Health Commission were
transferred to the department.  Consequently the department assumed all employee
entitlements and related provision as follows:

SAHT SACHA SAHC 30/06/1998
$ 000 $ 000 $ 000 $ 000

Current Employee Entitlements and Related Provisions
Annual Leave 1 406   67  1 582 3 055 
Long service leave 400   - 718 1 118 
Superannuation 163  5  210  378 
Provision for payroll tax 118  4  108  230 
Provision for workers compensation - - 1 1 

Non-Current Employee Entitlements and Related Provisions
Long service leave 5 407 208  6 461  12 076 
Superannuation 297  9  343  649 
Provision for payroll tax 342   13  246  601 

Provision for workers compensation -  - 2 2
(8 133) (306) (9 671) (18 110)

Total Net Revenues From Restructuring 67 147

8. Receivables
30/06/1998

$'000
Debtors 8 780
Interest 278
Tax Equivalent Regime 6 346

15 404

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30 J

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88

9. Property, Plant and Equipment
30/06/1998

$'000
Land
Parks Community Centre - At Valuer-General s valuation 30/6/96 2 380
At independent valuation - 30 June 1997 (1) 12 427

14 807

Buildings and Improvements
Parks Community Centre - At Valuer-General s valuation 30/6/96 35 000
At independent valuation - 30 June 1997 (1) 14 281
Accumulated Depreciation (18 553)

30 728

Plant and Equipment
At Cost 8 532
Accumulated Depreciation (5 390)

3 142 

Total Property, Plant and Equipment 48 677

(1) All land and buildings were restated to independent valuations in July 1997 other than 
transportable buildings.  The valuations were estimates of either the deprival value of the
property or in the case of residential housing, market value.  Market value being the   
estimate of the amounts for which the assets could be exchanged between a            
knowledgeable willing buyer and a knowledgeable willing seller in an arm s length 
transaction at the valuation date.  The department has set a policy for regular valuation 
of freehold land and buildings at least once every three financial years.

10. Payables
30/06/1998

$'000
Current Payables
Creditors 10 296
Accruals (Grants to organisations) 2 990
Accruals (Tax Equivalent Regime - SAHT) 4 846

18 132

11. Employee Entitlements and Related Provisions
30/06/1998

$'000
Current Employee Entitlements and Related Provisions
Accrued salaries &amp; wages 2 502
Annual leave 6 828
Long service leave 1 802
Superannuation 658
Provision for payroll tax 465
Provision for workers compensation 2 099
Other employee provisions 5

14 359

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30/06/1998
$'000

Non-Current Employee Entitlements and Related Provisions
Long service leave 22 592
Superannuation 752
Provision for payroll tax 718
Provision for workers compensation 4 109

28 171

12. Borrowings
30/06/1998

$'000
Current Borrowings
Advance - Enfield Council 45
Lease Incentive (1) 306

351
Non-Current Borrowings

Advance - Treasury Imprest A/C 285

(1) The department received a lump sum of $1m in 1995-96 from the SA Housing Trust in 
relation to the renewal of the non-cancellable operating lease of the Riverside Centre 
administrative property.  This amount is amortised against lease expenses over the term 
of the lease.

13. Notes to the Statement of Cash Flows
(a) Reconciliation of cash
Cash held at the end of the reporting year as shown in the Statement of Cash Flows is         
represented by the following balances:

30/06/1998
$'000

Special Deposit Account 56 748
Advance Accounts 278
Other deposits 15
Cash on Hand 11

57 052

(b) Reconciliation of Net Cash Used in Operating Activities to Net Cost of Services
30/06/1998

$'000
Net Cash Used in Operating Activities 225 590

Adjustments
Depreciation 3 750

Changes in Assets and Liabilities
Movement in receivables (1 412)
Movement in other current assets 302
Movement in recurrent payables (52 103)
Movement in employee entitlements &amp; related provisions 6 403
Movement in lease incentive (228)
Asset write-off 725
Movement in other liabilities 53

Net Cost of Services 183 080

Departm
ent of Hum

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fo

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to
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90

14. Department of Human Services effective full year
The following represents a full year picture of the Department of Human Services      
operating result by combining those revenues and expenses whilst under the control of 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Department for Family and 
Community Services with that of the department.

FACS DHUD DHS Total
$ 000 $ 000 $ 000 $ 000

Operating Expenses
Employee related 17 565   2 471 57 528  77 564
Supplies and services 5 812   5 611 29 592  41 015
Grants &amp; subsidies  49 077 74 101  125 087  248 265
Client payments 3 308   - 6 607 9 915
Depreciation  793 404 3 750 4 947 

Total Operating Expenses 76 555 82 587  222 564  381 706

Operating Revenue
Rent, fees and charges - 5 658  27 103  32 761 
Interest 90   362  2 110 2 562 

Dividends - HomeStart Finance - - 5 000 5 000 
Other 1 243   961 5 271 7 475 
Total Operating Revenue 1 333  6 981  39 484  47 798

Net Cost of Services  75 222   75 606  183 080  333 908 

Government Revenues
Department Appropriation  53 302   69 049  94 167  216 518 
Commonwealth grants  26 380   11 407  81 496  119 283 
Other grants &amp; contributions  - 1 397  112 1 509 
Total Revenues from Government  79 682   81 853  175 775  337 310

Net Revenues from Disposal of - (29) 407  378 
Non-Current Assets

Change in Net Assets   4 460  6 218 (6 898) 3 780
Before Restructuring

15. Expenditure commitments
Operating lease commitments

Non-cancellable operating lease rentals with a term of more than one year, and not provided
for within the financial statements are payable as follows:

30/06/1998
$'000

Not later than one year 7 119
Later than one year but not later than two years 3 940 
Later than two years but not later than five years 9 688 
Later than five years 1 946  

22 693 

Other commitments

The department has commitments of $6.542m representing the balance of grants held for the
Crisis Accommodation Program.

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16. Targeted Voluntary Separation Packages (TVSPs) 
For the purpose of this note the period represents the full financial year and therefore includes
packages accepted by employees of the former Department of Housing and Urban
Development and Family and Community Services.

During the period a total of 30 employees of the department accepted packages in line with the
State Government s policy.  The TVSP component of termination payments totalled $1.198m.  
The aggregate amount paid to employees who received TVSPs during 1997-98 for accrued
leave entitlements was $0.368m.

17. Administered Items
The following revenues, expenditures, assets and liabilities were administered but not
controlled by the department.  In accordance with Accounting Standard AAS29 the items have
been classified as  Administered  and have not been included in the Financial Statements

Schedule of Administered Revenue and Expenditure
for the period 23 October 1997 to 30 June 1998

$'000
Administered Expenditure

Concessions
Water &amp; Sewerage rates 17 148
Local Government rates 3 372 
Transport 8 722 
Electricity 8 510 
Rail Freight for charitable organisations -

Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund 1 198 
Charitable and Social Welfare Fund 2 628 
Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme 249 
Family Maintenance Orders 718 
Minister s Salary 68
Enfield Council salary &amp; wage 634  

43 247
Administered Revenues

Concessions 31 577 
Local Government Reform Fund 3 199 
Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund 1 113 
Charitable and Social Welfare Fund 2 055 
Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme 230 
Family Maintenance Orders 698 
Minister s Salary 68
Enfield Council salary &amp; wage recovery 634  

39 574 
Increase (Decrease) in Net Administered Assets Resulting from Operations (3 673)

Departm
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30 J

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92

Schedule of Administered Assets and Liabilities as at 30 June 1998
$ 000s

Administered Assets
Cash

Concessions 371 
Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund 1 619 
Charitable and Social Welfare Fund 268 
Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme 102 
Family Maintenance Orders 45 

2 405 
Receivables

Local Government Reform Fund 346 
Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund 6  

352 

Total Administered Assets 2 757 

Administered Liabilities
Creditors

Concessions 263 
Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund 2 
Charitable and Social Welfare Fund 2  

267 
Total Administered Liabilities 267 
Administered Net Assets 2 490

18. Employee remuneration
The number of department employees whose remuneration was over $100 000 was:

30/6/98
DHS SAHC SAHT
Number of Number of Number of
Employees Employees Employees

$ 100 001 - 110 000 2 6 4
$ 110 001 - 120 000 1 1 -
$ 120 001 - 130 000 2 2 -
$ 130 001 - 140 000 2 3 -
$ 140 001 - 150 000 1 2 1
$ 150 001 - 160 000 1 3 -
$ 160 001 - 170 000 1 - 1
$ 170 001 - 180 000 - 1 -

10 18 6

The total remuneration received or due and receivable by employees whose remuneration
exceeds $100 000:

DHS SAHC SAHT
$ 000 $ 000 $ 000
1 300 2 321 729

The table above discloses the number of employees of the department as at 30 June 1998
whose remuneration received exceeded $100 000.  As remuneration details incorporate the full
financial year it includes remuneration received by staff as employees of the former FACS and
DHUD (now incorporated with the Department of Human Services) or as employees, or
assigned employees, of the South Australian Health Commission and South Australian
Housing Trust (refer Note 1 on portfolio staffing restructure).

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19. Auditors Remuneration
Services provided by the Auditor General s Department with respect to the audit of the
department and projects administered by the department totalled $0.080m for the reporting
period.

20. Additional Financial Instruments Disclosure
(a) Accounting Policies and Terms and Conditions affecting Future Cash Flows

The department s receivables are generally settled within 30 days with bad debts written 
off in the period they are identified.  Bad debts historically have not been material with 
over 90% by value relating to other State Government bodies.
The department s payables are generally settled within 30 days.

(b) Interest Rate Risk Exposure
The department's exposure to interest rate risk and the effective weighted average interest rate
for classes of financial assets and financial liabilities is set out below.

Floating Non-interest Total
Interest rate Bearing 30/06/1998
$'000 $'000 $'000

Financial Assets
Cash and Deposits 57 052 - 57 052
Receivables - 15 404 15 404

57 052 15 404 72 456
Weighted average interest rate: 5 percent -
Financial Liabilities

Creditors &amp; accruals - 18 132 18 132
Borrowings - 636 636

- 18 768 18 768
Weighted average interest rate: -

(c) Net fair value of Financial Assets and Liabilities
The net fair value of cash and cash equivalents and non-interest bearing monetary    
financial assets and financial liabilities approximates their carrying value.

Carrying amount Net fair value
30/06/1998 30/06/1998
$'000 $'000

On-Balance Sheet
Financial Assets
Cash and Deposits  57 052  57 052 
Receivables  15 404  15 404  

72 456  72 456 
Financial Liabilities
Creditors &amp; accruals  18 132  18 132 
Borrowings  636  636   

18 768  18 768

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94

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
STATEMENT BY CHIEF EXECUTIVE
FOR THE PERIOD 23 OCTOBER 1997 TO 30 JUNE 1998

This report comprises the Financial Statements of the Department of Human Services, which
have been prepared on an accrual accounting basis.  In my opinion:

  the Operating Statement and the Statement of Cash Flows are drawn up to give a true and
fair view of the results of the operations and the cash flows of the department for period 
23 October 1997 to 30 June 1998;

  the Statement of Financial Position has been drawn up to give a true and fair view of the 
state of affairs of the department as at 30 June 1998.

The Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with Statements of Accounting
Concepts, Applicable Accounting Standards and the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987, as
amended.

Christine Charles
Chief Executive
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

18 September 1998

STATEMENT BY CHIEF
EXECUTIVE

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Auditor General s Department

TO THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE 
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

SCOPE
As required by section 31 of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987 I have audited the
financial statements of the Department of Human Services for the period 23 October to the
30 June 1998.

The financial statements comprise:
  An Operating Statement;
  A Statement of Financial Position;
  A Statement of Cash Flows;
  Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements; and
  Statement by the Chief Executive and the Director, Budgets.

The Chief Executive and the Director, Budgets are responsible for the preparation and
presentation of the financial statements and the information contained therein.  An independent
audit of the financial statements has been conducted in order to express an opinion on them to
the Chief Executive.

The audit has been conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Public Finance and
Audit Act 1987 and the Australian Auditing Standards to provide reasonable assurance as to
whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement.

Audit procedures include examination on a test basis of evidence supporting the amounts and
other disclosures in the financial statements, and the evaluation of accounting policies and
significant accounting estimates.  Those procedures were undertaken to form an opinion
whether, in all material respects, the financial statements are presented fairly in accordance
with the Treasurer s Instructions promulgated under the provisions of the Public Finance and
Audit Act 1987, Australian Accounting Standards and other mandatory professional reporting
requirements (Urgent Issues Group Consensus Views) so as to present a view which is
consistent with my understanding of the Department of Human Services  financial position, the
results of its operations and its cash flows.

The audit opinion expressed in this report has been formed on the above basis.

Departm
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INDEPENDENT AUDIT
REPORT



QUALIFICATION
As stated in Note 2(c) the Department provides grant monies to certain community
organisations which are subject to a requirement that monies unexpended at year end or at the
end of the grant period are repayable unless specific authority is obtained to carry funds
forward into the next financial year or grant period.  The Department has not conducted a
balance day confirmation process with external parties to determine what unexpended monies
should be repaid and consequently no receivable has been recognised in the accounts in
relation to these funds.

QUALIFIED AUDIT OPINION
In my opinion, except for the effects on the financial report of the matter referred to in the
qualification paragraph, the financial report presents fairly in accordance with the Treasurer s
Instructions promulgated under the provisions of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987,
applicable Australian Accounting Standards and other mandatory professional reporting
requirements, the financial position of the Department of Human Services as at 30 June 1998,
the results of its operations and its cash flows for the period ended 30 June 1998.

30 September 1998

K I MacPHERSON
AUDITOR-GENERAL

9th Floor State Administration Centre Victoria Square Adelaide 5000
Telephone (08) 226 9640  Facsimile (08) 226 9688  DX 56208 Victoria Square

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97

1998 1997
Note $'000 $'000

OPERATING EXPENSES:
Funding allocation to incorporated health services 1 431 260 1 309 085
Funding allocation to other bodies 64 221 74 979
Corporate policy, planning and administration 3,4,5 70 853 62 770
Unincorporated health services 3,4,5 61 100 66 275
Interstate patient transfers 9 951 4 592
Interest on loans 26 3 298 3 427
Total Cost of Services and Funding 1 640 683 1 521 128

OPERATING REVENUES:
Corporate policy, planning and administration 6 27 587 33 406
Unincorporated health services 6 8 572 3 186
Interstate patient transfers 17 741 11 704
Interest on loans 26 3 763 3 933
Total Operating Revenue 57 663 52 229

NET COST OF SERVICES AND FUNDING (1 583 020) (1 468 899)

GOVERNMENT CONTRIBUTIONS FOR 
PROVISION OF HEALTH SERVICES:
SA Government appropriation 8(a)(c) 671 466 748 982
Commonwealth specific purpose funds 8b 674 666 658 858
Grants from other SA Government agencies 8(a)(c) 184 240 49 930

TOTAL GOVERNMENT CONTRIBUTIONS 
FOR PROVISION OF HEALTH SERVICES 1 530 372 1 457 770
Net gain (loss) on sale of property, plant and equipment 7 (1 265) (3 280)
Abnormal items 9a - (7 399)

CHANGE IN NET ASSETS RESULTING FROM 
OPERATIONS (53 913) (21 808)
Extraordinary items 9b 2 517 (57 902)
Restructure of Administrative Arrangements 10  9 671 -

CHANGE IN NET ASSETS RESULTING 
FROM OPERATIONS, EXTRAORDINARY 
ITEMS &amp; RESTRUCTURE OF 
ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS (41 725) (79 710)

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN
HEALTH COMMISSION
OPERATING 
STATEMENT
for the year ended 
30 June 1998

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98

1998 1997
Note $'000 $'000

CURRENT ASSETS:
Cash 29 198 91 483
Receivables 11, 26 28 331 10 975
Inventories 12       320 56
Other 13 1 631 330
Total Current Assets 59 480 102 844

NON-CURRENT ASSETS:
Receivables 11, 26 36 520 37 556
Land and improvements 14 15 636 14 611
Plant and equipment 15 5 694 9 659
Other 13 1 013 -
Total Non-Current Assets 58 863 61 826
TOTAL ASSETS 118 343 164 670

CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Payables 16 17 281 15 957
Borrowings 17 2 110 2 335
Employee entitlements 18 630 5 668
Provisions 19 10  937 11 139
Other 20 1 613 1 596
Total Current Liabilities 32 571 36 695

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Borrowings 17 29 533 30 414
Employee entitlements 18 623 8 870
Provisions 19 26 981 24 074
Other 20 677 -
Total Non-Current Liabilities 57 814 63 358
TOTAL LIABILITIES 90 385 100 053

NET ASSETS 27 958 64 617

EQUITY
Accumulated surplus 21 27 958 64 617

TOTAL EQUITY 27 958 64 617
Commitments 22,24

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH
COMMISSION
STATEMENT OF 
FINANCIAL POSITION
for the year ended 
30 June 1998

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99

Note Inflows Inflows
(Outflows) (Outflows)
1998 1998
$'000 $'000

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
PAYMENTS:
Funding allocation to incorporated health services (1 446 289) (1 314 295)
Funding allocation to other bodies (62 250) (73 911)
Corporate policy, planning and administration (67 291) (35 269)
Unincorporated health services (60 896) (66 275)
Interstate patient transfers (2 351) (4 592)
Interest on loans (2 577) (2 692)
New loans (290) (1 257)
RECEIPTS:
Corporate policy, planning and administration 34 202 32 842
Unincorporated health services 8 572 6 512
Interstate patient transfers 12 125 13 300
Interest on loans 2 843 3 217
Loan principal repayments 2 557 2 914
Reduction in overdraft due to devolution of entity 5 -
CASH FLOWS FROM GOVERNMENT:
SA government appropriation 671 466 748 982
Commonwealth specific purpose funds 670 894 658 858
Grants from other SA Government agencies 183 228 48 606

NET CASH (USED IN)/PROVIDED BY 
OPERATING ACTIVITIES 25(b) (56 052) 16 940
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Receipts from sale of non-current assets 7 1 247 1 873
Payments for purchase of non-current assets 25(c) (5 653) (2 287)
NET CASH (USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES (4 406) (414)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Repayment of borrowings (1 493) (2 453)
NET CASH USED IN FINANCING ACTIVITIES (1 493) (2 453)
Net (decrease)/increase in cash held (61 951) 14 073
Cash at 1 July 90 815 76 742

CASH AT 30 JUNE 25(a) 28 864 90 815

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN
HEALTH COMMISSION
STATEMENT OF
CASHFLOWS
for the year ended 30 June 1998

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1. South Australian Health 
Commission and Health 
Service Units

The South Australian Health Commission (the
Commission) is established as a body
corporate under the South Australian Health
Commission Act 1976, as amended (the Act).
The Commission s function is to promote the
health and wellbeing of the people of the
State and to ensure the proper allocation and
use of resources between hospitals, health
centres and health services.  Hospitals, health
centres and health services are either
incorporated as body corporates under the Act
(Incorporated Health Service Units) or are
unincorporated (Unincorporated Health
Service Units).
The Commission, designated as the Chief
Entity for financial reporting purposes, is
required under the Act to keep proper
accounts of its financial affairs and to have
those accounts audited by the Auditor
General.  The Chief Entity s accounts for
financial reporting purposes comprises the
financial affairs of the Commission and
certain Unincorporated Health Service Units.
The financial affairs of Incorporated Health
Service Units do not form part of the Chief
Entity s financial report.  Under the Act,
Incorporated Health Service Units are
required to maintain separate accounts of their
respective financial affairs and to have them
separately audited by the Auditor General or
an auditor approved by the Auditor General.  

This financial report then presents the
financial affairs of the corporate and health

service related functions of the Commission
and those financial affairs relating to certain
Unincorporated Health Service Units,
notably:

South Australian Health Commission
  Corporate Policy, Planning and 

Administration
  Public and Environmental Health 

Service
  Unincorporated Health Service Units 
  Management Assessment Panel
  Office of the Public Advocate
  Guardianship Board
  Mental Health Services
  Rural Health Training Unit
  Adult Physiological and Neurological 

Option Co-ordination Agency
  Brain Injury Option Co-ordination 

Agency

On 25 April 1998, all public sector employees
and officers of the Commission employed
under a contract on a temporary or casual
basis, or for a fixed term, other than the Chief
Executive Officer and the Deputy Chief
Executive Officer; employees of the former
South Australian Mental Health Services
(SAMHS) programs; Mental Health Services
for Older People and Rural and Remote;
employees remunerated at hourly, daily,
weekly or piece-work rates of payments; and
employees and officers of a hospital or health
centre incorporated under the Act were
appointed to the administrative unit of the
Department of Human Services under the
Public Sector Management Act 1995.

100

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN
HEALTH COMMISSION 
NOTES TO AND PART OF
THE FINANCIAL 
STATEMENT
for the year ended 30 June 1998

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With respect to Mental Health Services, the
Commission continued the devolution of
certain Mental Health Services to various
metropolitan hospitals during 1997-98.  The
associated management and operating costs of
these services will be brought to account in
the financial statements of these hospitals.
Those functions and activities that remain
within the Chief Entity at 30 June 1998 are
associated with Rural and Remote Mental
Health and the Mental Health Unit
(realignment team).  The Commission also
devolved the Sexual Offenders Treatment
Assistance Program and Migrant Health
during 1997-98.
All land and buildings and infrastructure costs
associated with the two Mental Health
Service campuses at Glenside and Hillcrest
are brought to account in the financial state-
ments for Royal Adelaide Hospital as the
funding for the infrastructure costs associated
with these Mental Health Service campuses
has been allocated to Royal Adelaide Hospital
in 1997-98.

2. Significant Accounting 
Policies Financial Report 
Preparation

The financial statements have been prepared
in accordance with the requirements of the
Act, South Australian Health Commission
Accounting Policies and the Public Finance
and Audit Act 1987.  The Commission, in
accordance with the approval of the Treasurer,
has submitted to the Auditor General the
financial statements reflecting the financial
affairs of the Chief Entity.  Whole-of-Health
Sector financial statements reflecting the
consolidation of the accounts of the Chief
Entity and Incorporated Health Service Units
are required to be submitted to the Auditor
General by 31 December 1998.
The 1997-98 financial statements include
comparative figures for the preceding
financial year which were the subject of audit
qualification in the previous year.  That
qualification resulted from limitations in some
systems and records, subsidiary to the accrual
based general ledger system, which prevented
the production of timely and appropriate
information to establish with sufficient
certainty the values ascribed to those
disclosure items within the financial
statements.  

The items related to Interstate Patient
Transfers - Operating Expenses (Payables)
and Revenues (Receivables); Budget
Variations included under Funding Allocation
to Incorporated Health Services - Operating
Expenses (Payables/Receivables); and
Employee Entitlements - Liabilities.

The matters giving rise to the qualification
were resolved during the year and as a
consequence disclosures with respect to the
1997-98 financial statement figures are
unqualified.

These financial statements encompass the
reporting of the revenues, expenses, assets
and liabilities associated with the financial
reporting responsibility of the Chief Entity
described in Note 1.

Health Service Unit Funding

Funding is allocated from the Chief Entity s
Special Deposit Account based on the net cost
of health unit activities.  Under net funding
principles established with Health Service
Units, the Units are permitted to retain
revenue from operations to finance recurrent
activities.  Health Service Unit revenues are
therefore not included as revenues in the
financial report of the Chief Entity.  

(a) Principles of Consolidation
This financial report consolidates the 
assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses 
of the Chief Entity comprising the South
Australian Health Commission and the 
Unincorporated Health Service Units 
detailed in Note 1.  

In preparing the consolidated accounts 
the effect of all transactions between the
Chief Entity and these Unincorporated 
Health Service Units are eliminated in 
full.  

Accounting policies are applied        
consistently by both the Chief Entity and
the Unincorporated Health Service 
Units.

(b) Property, Plant and Equipment
The Statement of Financial Position 
includes property, plant and equipment 
controlled by the Chief Entity and 
Unincorporated Health Service Units.

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In the case of land and buildings, values 
at 1 July 1997 are based on the deprival 
value method of valuation.

In the case of property, plant and equip
ment other than land and buildings, the 
value at 1 July 1997 is calculated on the 
basis of replacement cost (or historic 
cost where replacement cost is not  
available) less a deduction to reflect the 
portion of service potential which has 
been consumed since the asset was 
acquired, that is, written down     
replacement cost (or depreciated historic
cost).
All assets acquired since 1 July 1997 are
accounted for at cost.  In accordance 
with South Australian Health 
Commission Accounting Policies, land 
and buildings are to be revalued every 
three years thereafter.

The Department of Treasury and 
Finance has approved the delay of the 
revaluation of land and buildings until 
1998-99 to enable the finalisation of the 
development and trial of the CABS 
(Condition of Asset Based System) 
framework and methodology, with the 
intent of using it for the revaluation of 
land and buildings in 1998-99.

Minor items of property, plant and 
equipment with an individual value of 
less than $1000 are expensed at the time
they are acquired.

(c) Depreciation
All items of property, plant and     
equipment, except land are depreciated 
in accordance with South Australian 
Health Commission Accounting Policies
on a straight line basis over their useful 
lives.

d) Income Recognition
All income is recorded as revenue in the
Operating Statement at the time it is 
earned or at the time control passes to 
the Chief Entity.

Patient fees, nursing home fees and 
other client fees are based on rates  
specified by South Australian Health 
Commission Regulations.

(e) Employee Entitlements
The charge for wages, salaries and other 
employee entitlements includes amounts
expected to be paid to employees for 
their pro rata entitlements to long      
service leave and annual leave.  Pro rata 
long service leave is accrued for all 
employees with five or more years     
service.  An on-cost for workers      
compensation and superannuation is 
included in the employee entitlements 
liability.  As a result of the restructure of
administrative arrangements which 
transferred the employees and officers of
the Act to the administrative unit of the 
Department of Human Services, the 
Department of Human Services has 
assumed all future obligations in regards
to the accumulated employee entitle
ments for transferred employees.

(f) Services provided free of charge
The financial report does not reflect any 
amount for employee entitlements     
provided on a voluntary basis.  Goods 
and Services provided free of charge or 
for a nominal value are included in the 
revenue amount in the financial       
statements.

(g) Operating Leases
Leases under which substantially all the 
risks and benefits of ownership are 
effectively retained by the lessor are 
classified as operating leases.  Operating
lease payments are charged to expense 
over the period of expected benefit.  
These leases are detailed in Note 22 to 
the accounts.

(h) Inventories
Items held for use by the Chief Entity 
are accounted for at cost unless it is 
apparent they are obsolete or surplus to 
requirements in which case they are 
written off.  

Items held for sale are accounted for at 
the lower of cost or net realisable value.

(i) Specific Commonwealth and Other 
Purpose Funds

The Chief Entity receives specific      
purpose funds from various sources,     

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principally from the Commonwealth 
Government which are outlined in Note 
8(b).  These amounts are controlled by 
the entity and applied towards the fund
ing of health service related activities.

The Chief Entity s accounting records 
do not distinguish the amount unspent at
balance date with respect to each fund.

(j) Superannuation
The Chief Entity contributed $2.071 
million (1997: $2.414 million) towards 
the accruing employee superannuation 
retirement benefits for staff employed by
or assigned to the Commission under a 
number of employer sponsored       
superannuation schemes.  These 
schemes include the SA Superannuation 
Fund and a number of non-government 
superannuation schemes.  The Chief 
Entity pays the accruing employer   
component. The funds' trustees are 
responsible for managing the employee 
retirement liability.

In addition, the Chief Entity contributed 
$1.142 million (1997: $1.641 million) in
relation to employees who are not active
contributors of employer schemes as 
required under the Commonwealth 
Superannuation Guarantee 
(Administration) Act 1992.

(k) Workers  Compensation
The Commission is an exempt employer
under the Workers Rehabilitation and 
Compensation Act 1986. 

Under a scheme arrangement the 
Commission and participating exempt 
Health Service Units are responsible for 
the management of workers             
rehabilitation and compensation.

Health services participating in the 
scheme continue to be directly      
responsible for the cost of workers
compensation claims, the              
implementation and funding of         
preventive programs and are allocated 
funding for this purpose.  The 
Commission has retained responsibility 
for the settlement of lump sum and  
journey claims.

The worker s compensation liability 
amounts for workers compensation at 30
June 1998 has been estimated at $25.901
million (1997: $22.295 million).  That 
liability has been determined by an  
actuarial assessment conducted by 
Auton Consulting Pty Ltd.  The         
valuation method used was the Payment 
Per Claim Incurred (PPCI) method.  The
assessment has been carried out in 
accordance with Australian Accounting 
Standard 26, Financial Reporting of 
General Insurance Activities  and the 
Workcover Guidelines for Actuarial 
Assessments. The liability covers claims
incurred but not yet paid, incurred but 
not reported claims and the anticipated 
direct and indirect costs of settling those
claims. The liability for outstanding 
claims is measured as the present value 
of the expected future payments,  
reflecting the fact that all the claims do 
not have to be paid out in the immediate
future.

(l) General Public Liability and 
Professional Indemnity Insurance
The overall value of outstanding claims 
as at 30 June 1998 was estimated to be 
$80.784 million (1997: $71.939        
million).  Of this amount, the Chief 
Entity as a participant in the State 
Government's Insurance Program, is 
only liable for $11.267 million (1997: 
$12.168 million).

(m) Rounding
All amounts are rounded to the nearest 
thousand dollars.

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3. Operating Expenses - Salaries, Wages, Other Employee Entitlements
and Staffing Expenses

Salaries, wages, employee entitlements and staffing expenses recorded in the Operating
Statement comprise:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Salaries &amp; wages 38 146 43 928
Long service leave 676 2 779
Superannuation 3 451 4 794
Annual leave 2 546 4 270
Targeted separation packages 118  676
Other 79 788

45 016 57 235

Included in the cost of salaries, wages and employee entitlements total above are the staffing
expenses associated with staffing the Commission from the 26 April 1998 to the 30 June 1998
by Department of Human Services employees.  These expenses amounted to $6.885 million.
Targeted Voluntary Separation Expenses (TVSPs)
In accordance with government policy to reduce the public sector workforce, four (1997: 14)
employees of the Chief Entity were paid TVSPs during 1997-98.  To 30 June 1998 payments
amounted to $118 000 (1997: $676 000).  These payments were met by the Chief Entity and
have been recovered from the Department of the Premier and Cabinet (in 1997 the receivable
was $31 000).  
In addition, accrued annual leave and long service entitlements amounting to $37 000 (1997:
$227 000) were paid to those employees who received a TVSP.  These payments are included
in salaries, wages and other employee entitlements as shown above.

4. Operating Expenses - Goods and Services
Goods and services expenditure recorded in the Operating Statement comprises:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Food supplies 98 527
Drug supplies 6 674 1 571
Medical, surgical and laboratory supplies 655 933
Housekeeping 328 922
Electricity, gas and fuel 170  207
Minor equipment 962 680
Repairs and maintenance 898 620
Doubtful debts - 105
Property sale expenses - 750
Administration expenditure (Note 4(a)) 26 207 23 828
Insurance 20 797 26 019
Workers Compensation Expenses 4 787 -
Interpreter / translation fees 1 577 1 572
Patient travel concessions 3 876 3 234
Patient domiciliary services 7 555 3 261
Fee for service - extended care beds 4 835 1 130
Other 5 234 4 621

84 653 69 980

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105

(a) Administration Expenditure
Administration expenditure recorded in the Operating Statement comprises:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Consultancies (Note 4(b)) 2 198 1 517
External auditors 165 167
Staff travel 1 397 1 410
Operating lease 390 149
Staff training and development 1 789 1 067
Occupancy rent and rates 3 265 3 027
Port Pirie Lead Decontamination 459 1 002
Advertising 437  582
Contract staffing 5 907 2 926
Inter-Agency Project Costs 159 340
Health Survey Costs 399 324
Telephones 1 045 1 153
Computer and software 2 751 2 701
Postage 587 360
Printing and stationery 1 305 1 354
Periodicals, journals  &amp; publications 568 261
Legal Fees 461 237
Other 2 925 5 251

26 207 23 828
Breakdown of Consultancies

No 1998 No 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Below $10 000 35 133 24 100
$10 000 - $50 000 23 570 20 462
Above $50 000 8 1 495 8 955

66 2 198 52 1 517

5. Operating Expenses - Depreciation and Amortisation
Depreciation expenditure recorded within the Operating Statement comprises:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Buildings 45 27
Plant &amp; Equipment 1 561 1 447
Other amortisation 678 356

2 284 1 830

6. Operating Revenues
Revenue recorded within the Operating Statement includes:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Patient charges and fees 2 055 2 557
Interest revenue 4 188 6 212
Insurance cost recoveries from Health Services 20 268 19 877
Insurance claims cost recoveries from SAICORP 1 837 1 390
Other expense recoveries from Health Services 1 517 3 140
Targeted separation packages 118 676
Health Plus Management Contract 2 296 -
Assets received for nil consideration (Note 6 (a)     1 445 1 310
Other 2 435 1 430

36 159 36 592

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(a) Assets Received for Nil Consideration
During the reporting period the Chief Entity received assets for nil consideration as folows:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Land 1 350 622
Buildings 95 688

1 445 1 310

7. Net Gain/(Loss) from Sale of Non-Current Assets
During the reporting period the Chief Entity sold land and buildings and plant and equipment:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Proceeds from sale 1 247 1 873
Amount Receivable 2 751 2 917
Less: written down value of assets sold (5 263) (8 070)

(1 265) (3 280)

8. Total Government Revenues for Provision of General Health 
Services

(a) SA Government Appropriations
SA Government funding consists of $671.466 million (1997: $651.690 million) pursuant to the
Appropriation Act 1997.  (In addition in 1997 the Chief Entity received  $97.292 million
pursuant to the Petroleum Products Regulation Act 1995).

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Commonwealth Government Specific Purpose Grants
The principal program revenues during the year were:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Aboriginal Advancement Program 200 1 624
Aged Care Assessment Program 3 562 3 524
AIDS Strategy - 2 098
Artificial Limbs Scheme 1 007 985
Breast Screen Australia - 2 603
Cervical Cancer Screening - 741
Childhood Immunisation - 1 144
Commonwealth - State Disability Agreement 40 382 39 760
Daw Park Repat Hospital 53 517 54 951
Daw Park Repat Hospital - Capital - 8 000
Dental Health - 4 913
Drug Programs - 1 883
Health Plus - 1 736
Highly Specialised Drugs 13 538 10 171
Medicare Agreement:  

Base funding arrangement 356 440 339 707  
Base provision pool - Pool A 134 377 129 018  
Annual adjustment - Pool B 9 896 10 993  
AIDS care &amp; treatment 3 557 3 272  
Mental health reform 2 363 2 309  
Outpatients Program - 1 069  
Palliative Care 2 460 2 282  
Capital 468 760  
Other - 65

Magnetic resonance imaging 2 265 1 998
National women s health grant - 636
Pathology laboratory grant - IMVS 29 094 24 501
Public Health Agreement 12 137 -
Red Cross blood transfusion service 4 996 4 147
Red Cross blood transfusion service - capital 444 615
Woomera Hospital 971 963
Other minor schemes 2 992 2 390

674 666 658 858

(c) Grants from Other SA Government Departments
Grants consisted of funds amounting to $7.4 million (1997: $7.5 million) from the Community
Development Fund, $131.074 million from the Business Franchise Fee Replacement Revenue
Account to replace amounts formally received pursuant to the Petroleum Products Regulation
Act 1995 and $45.766 million (1997: $42.430 million) for Home and Community Care
recouped from the Department of Human Services.

9. Abnormal and Extraordinary Items
(a) Abnormal Items
In 1998 there were no abnormal items.  (In 1997 advances made in prior years to Health
Service Units to fund budget deficits to the value of $6.827 million were written off and the
Cook Chill loan to North Western Adelaide Health Service for $0.572 million was converted to
a grant). 

(b) Extraordinary Items
The extraordinary profit of $2.517 million (1997: $57.770 million loss) disclosed in the
Operating Statement results from the devolution of Mental Health Services.

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1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Royal Adelaide Hospital 
(Eastern Community Mental Health Service) (9 244) 54 611
NWAHS (North West Adelaide Mental Health Service) 6 359 2 069
Flinders Medical Centre (Southern Mental Health Service) 368 1 119
Noarlunga Health Services (Morier Ward) - 64
Women s &amp; Children s Hospital - (93)
Total (2 517) 57 770
Net liabilities of $1.2 million (1997: $2.145 million) were retained by the Chief Entity.

10. Restructure of Administrative Arrangements
The restructure of administrative arrangements disclosed in the Operating Statement results
from the transfer of the entitlements associated with the employees and officers incorporated
into the administrative unit of the Department of Human Services under the Public Sector
Management Act 1995.  Refer to Note 1.  The net revenue of the restructure to the Commission
is $9.671 million as the Department of Human Services has completely assumed all future
obligations in regards to the prior accumulated employee entitlements before the transfer date
and thereafter.

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Restructure of Administrative Arrangements 9 671 0
9 671 0

11. Receivables
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Current
Grants 17 641 2 180
Advances 920 573
Loans 2 277 1 793
Property sales 4 176 2 917
Sundry receivables 3 317 3 512

28 331 10 975
Non-Current
Loan s 34 435 36 266
Advances - 920
Property sales 1 492 -
Sundry receivables 693 470

36 620 37 656
Less: provision for doubtful debts 100 100

36 520 37 556

12. Inventories
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Drug Supplies 239 -
Stationery 81 56

320 56

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13. Other Assets
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Current
Prepayments 1 631 330

1 631 330
Non-Current
Prepayments 1 013 -

1 013 -

14. Land and Improvements
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Buildings (at current cost) 4 373 3 436
Other improvements (at current cost) 5 236 2 224

9 609 5 660
Less: Accumulated depreciation 1 778 1 055

7 831 4 605
Site land (at current cost) 46 46
Other land (at current cost) 7 759 9 960

7 805 10 006
15 636 14 611

15. Plant and Equipment
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Plant and equipment at cost 11 860 16 041
Less: Accumulated depreciation 6 181 6 412

5 679 9 629
Motor vehicles at cost 60 60
Less: Accumulated depreciation 45 30

15 30

5 694 9 659

16. Payables
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Current
Payables 17 068 15 691
Accruals 213 266

17 281 15 957

17. Borrowings
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Current
Department of Treasury and Finance 1 776 1 667
Bank overdrafts 334 668

2 110 2 335
Non-Current
Department of Treasury and Finance 29 533 30 414

29 533 30 414

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These borrowings are due for repayment:
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Not later than one year 2 110 2 335
Later than one year and not later than two years 1 243 1 118
Later than two years and not later than five years 429 1 587
Later than five years 27 861 27 709

31 643 32 749

18. Employee Entitlements
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Current
Long service leave 98 1 277
Annual leave 392 2 924
Accrued salaries and wages 140   540
Superannuation - 924
Other - 3

630 5 668
Non-Current
Long service leave 623 8 443
Superannuation - 427

623 8 870

Due to the restructure of administrative arrangements referred to in Notes 1 and 10, the
Department of Human Services has assumed the Chief Entity s future obligations in regards to
the accumulated employee entitlements and in respect of transferred staff.  In addition, current
Enterprise Bargaining negotiations on wage parity for Department of Human Services 
employees transferred from the Commission may result in a future obligation for parity
adjustments back paid by the administrative department.  As at sign off these negotiations have
not yet concluded deeming the measurement of any future obligation unreliable.

19. Provisions
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Current
Insurance 3 372 3 668
Workers compensation 7 565 7 471

10 937 11 139
Non-Current
Provision for property sale costs 750 750
Insurance 7 895 8 500
Workers compensation 18 336 14 824

26 981 24 074

20. Other Liabilities
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Current
Unearned revenue 1 329 1 333
Other 284 263

1 613 1 596
Non-Current
Unearned revenue 677 -

677 -

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21. Equity
Accumulated Surplus Accumulated Surplus

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Consolidated
Balance at 1 July 64 617 144 327
Deficit of the reporting period (41 725) (79 710)
Prior Period Adjustments 5 066 -
Balance at 30 June 27 958 64 617

22. Operating Leases
At 30 June 1998, the Chief Entity had the following commitments under non-cancellable
operating leases:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Not later than one year 3 403 3 167
Later than one year and not later than two years 3 055 2 909
Later than two years and not later than five years 7 678 7 299
Later than five years 359 3 485

14 495 16 860

23. Contingent Liabilities
A non-quantifiable contingent liability in relation to a guarantee provided until January 2001 to
Palantir Pty Ltd for the operation of the Noarlunga Private Hospital.  Under the terms of the
guarantee, the State is liable for all losses and retains all profits of the Noarlunga Private
Hospital.  For the financial year 1997-98, the loss amounted to $3 302 (1997: $44 926).

24. Commitments for Capital Expenditures
During the reporting period the Chief Entity had approved for commitment capital expenditure
for a number of specific projects.  The total value outstanding as at the end of the reporting
period for specific projects whose value is at least $1 million amounted to $81.568 million
(1997: $67.5 million).  These amounts have not been brought to account in the financial
statements.

These amounts are due for payment:
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Not later than one year 50 335 56 000
Later than one year and not later than two years 26 779 7 300
Later than two years and not later than five years 4 454 4 200

81 568 67 500

25. Notes to the Statement of Cash Flows
(a) Reconciliation of Cash
For the purpose of the Statement of Cash Flows, cash includes cash on hand and deposit
accounts and is reconciled to related items in the Statement of Financial Position as follows:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Cash on hand 85 85
Cash at bank 29 113 91 398

29 198 91483
Bank overdraft (334) (668)

28 864 90 815

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(b) Reconciliation of change in Net Assets to Net Cash 
used in Operating Activities

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Change in Net Assets resulting from Operations, 
Extraordinary Items and Restructure of 
Administrative Arrangements (41 725) (79 710)
Extraordinary item (9 671) 57 902
Add (Less): 
Devolution of entity (net of cash) (2 517) 7 399
Net loss on sale of property 1 265 3 280
Non-cash items:
Depreciation 3 297 1 830    
Assets received for nil consideration (1 445) (1 310)
Provisions raised 13 954 35 213
Other 779 -
Change in assets and liabilities after devolution of entity:
(Increase)/decrease in receivables (18 523) (4 258)
(Increase)/ decrease in other current assets (1 778) (128)
(Increase)/decrease in payables 375 (3 103)
(Increase)/decrease in other current liabilities 714 1 596    
(Decrease)/increase in borrowings (777) (1 771)
Net cash used in operating activities (56 052) 16 940

(c) Purchase of Non-Current Assets
1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Payments for acquisition of plant and equipment 2 876 2 287
2 876 2 287

26. Reconciliation of Inter-Health Loans
As at 30 June 1998 the balance of loans to Health Service Units and other bodies was $36.712
million (1997: $38.059 million).  The movement and status of the overall loans position is as
follows :

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Balance at 1 July 38 059 39 535
Add:    

Advances to Health Units 290 1 257  
Interest charges 3 763 3 933

Total Repayable 42 112 44 725
Less:    

Repayments received * 5 400 6 094  
Conversion of loan to grant - 572

Balance as at 30 June 36 712 38 059

* Repayments received consist of $2.843 million (1997: $3.180 million) for interest and 
$2.557 million (1997: $2.914 million) for principal.

The Chief Entity to 30 June 1998 has financed the Health Service Units and other bodies with
loans amounting to $5.403 million (1997: $6.297 million) from South Australian Health
Commission funds and $31.309 million (1997: $32.081 million) from back to back loan
arrangements with the Department of Treasury and Finance.

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113

The movements and status of the back to back loan arrangements are as follows:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Balance at 1 July 32 081 33 761
Add:    
Interest charged 3 298 3 427
Total Repayable 35 379 37 188
Less:   
Repayments* 4 070 5 107

Balance as at 30 June 31 309 32 081

* Repayments consist of $2.577 million (1997: $2.654 million) for interest and $1.493  
million (1997: $2.453 million) for principal

27. Commissioners and Related Party Information
Commission members who have served during the course of the reporting period are:
Mr Ray Blight Chief Executive Officer; South Australian Health Commission

(resigned 14 April 1998)
Ms Christine Charles Chief Executive; South Australian Health Commission 

(appointed 15 April 1998)
Professor W. Runciman Professor and Head; Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care;

Royal Adelaide Hospital
Dr David Filby Executive Director; Policy and Budget; South Australian Health 

Commission
Ms Helen Tolstoshev Chief Executive Officer; Nurses Board of South Australia
Mr Jim Birch Chief Executive Officer; Women s &amp; Children s 

Hospital

Aggregate fees received or receivable 1998 1997
by members of the Commission in their $ 000 $ 000
capacity as members of the Commission only

9 9

The number of the Commission members included in the above figures are shown in their
relevant income bands:

1998 1997
Number of Number of
Members Members

Nil to $9 999 1 1

Members of the Commission use the services of the Chief Entity under terms and conditions
no more favourable than members of the public.
Professor Runciman as President of the Australian Patient Safety Foundation (APSF) has
entered into an agreement to provide an incident reporting and monitoring system for all public
hospitals in South Australia.  Professor Runciman declares he has no pecuniary interest in
APSF.

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28. Administered Funds
During the course of the year the Chief Entity administered funds on behalf of other organisa-
tions.  The funds administered were:

1998 1997
$ 000 $ 000

Balance held at 1 July 380 1 081
Add: Receipts during the year 7 054 19 755
Less: Expenses during the year 7 183 20 456
Balance held as at 30 June 251 380

Employee Remuneration greater than $100 000
Total TVSP

1998 Value Component
Number $ 000 $ 000

$100 000 to $109 999 7 734 -
$110 000 to $119 999 1 115 -
$120 000 to $129 999 2 251 -
$130 000 to $139 999 3 394
$140 000 to $149 999 2 290 -
$150 000 to $159 999 3 464 -
$170 000 to $179 999 1 175

*19 2 423 -
* Comprises administrative and health service related employees and includes three 

employees of Unincorporated Health Service Units.
Total TVSP

1997 Value Component
Number $ 000 $ 000

$100 000 to $109 999 9 945 136
$110 000 to $119 999 5 571 71
$120 000 to $129 999 3 379 98
$140 000 to $149 999 1 148 -
$150 000 to $159 999 1 155 -
$190 000 to $199 999 1 194 -

*20 2 392 305
* Comprises administrative and health service related employees and includes 9 employees

of Unincorporated Health Service Units.
The table above recognises the number of employees who were employed by the Commission,
or assigned to the Commission from the Department of Human Services (refer Note 1), and
whose full year remuneration exceeded $100 000.

30. Additional Financial Instruments Disclosure
(a) Accounting Policies and Terms and Conditions Affecting Future Cash Flows
Financial Assets
Cash deposits are recognised at their nominal amounts.  Interest is credited to revenue as it
accrues.  The Chief Entity invests surplus funds with the Reserve Bank at call.  Interest is
earned on the daily balance at rates based on the Department of Treasury and Finance 90 day
bank bill rate.  Interest is paid at the end of each quarter.
Trade accounts receivables are generally settled within 30 days and are carried at amounts due.
Credit terms are net 30 days.  A provision is raised for any doubtful debts based on a review of
all outstanding amounts at balance date.  Bad debts are written off in the period in which they
are identified.
Grants and property sales receivables are carried at amounts due.  A provision is raised for any
doubtful debts based on a review of all outstanding amounts at balance date.  Bad debts are
written off in the period in which they are identified.  

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Loans are recognised at the amounts lent.  Collectability of amounts outstanding is reviewed at
balance date.  Provision is made for bad and doubtful loans where collection of the loan or part
thereof  is judged to be less rather than more likely.  In very rare circumstances, loan
repayment may be waived.  Interest is credited to revenue as it accrues.  No security is
generally required.  Principal is repaid in full at maturity.  Interest rates are fixed.  Interest
payments are due on the day of the scheduled agreed terms of payment.

Financial Liabilities
Trade accounts payable, including accruals not yet billed, are recognised when the economic
entity becomes obliged to make future payments as a result of a purchase of assets or services
at their nominal amounts.  Trade accounts payable are generally settled within 30 days.
Borrowings and the Overdraft are recognised when issued at the amount of the net proceeds
due and carried at cost until settled.  Interest is recognised as an expense on an effective yield
basis.
Grants payable are recognised at their nominal amounts when the economic entity becomes
obliged to make future payments as a result of an unpaid appropriation or failure to meet grant
conditions.
A non-quantifiable contingent liability is the guarantee provided until January 2001 to Palantir
Pty Ltd for the operation of the Noarlunga Private Hospital.  No provision is included in the
accounts for this contingent liability because it is considered unlikely any significant liability
will arise.
All Assets and Liabilities are unsecured.

Interest Rate Risk Exposures
The Chief Entity s exposure to interest rate risk and the effective weighted average interest rate
for classes of financial assets and financial liabilities is set out below.  
Exposures arise predominantly from assets and liabilities at variable interest rates as the Chief
Entity intends to hold fixed rate assets and liabilities to maturity.

Fixed interest maturing in:
1998 Floating 1 Year or Over 1 More than Non- Total Wieghted

Interest Less to 5 Years 5 Years Interest Average
Rate $ 000s $ 000s $ 000s Bearing $ 000s Effective
$000s $ 000s Rate

Financial Assets
Cash and Deposits 29 198 - - - - 29 198 5.01%
Loans - Fixed - 145 2 427 33082 - 35 654 10.44%
Loans - Non-Interest 
Bearing - - - - 1 058 1 058 N/A
Advances - - - - 920 920 N/A
Grants Receivable - - - - 17 641 17 641 N/A
Property Sales 
Receivable - - - - 5 668 5 668 N/A
Sundry 
Receivables - - - - 4 010 4 010 N/A

29 198 145 2 427 33 082    29 297 94 149

Financial Liabilities
Creditors &amp; accruals - - - - 17 281 17 281 N/A
Borrowings - Fixed - - 2427 28 882 - 31 309 10.35%
Borrowings - Floating 334 - - - - 334 13.40%

334 - 2 427 28 882 17 281 48 924

(b) Foreign Exchange Risk
The Chief Entity does not enter into any forward foreign exchange contracts. 

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(c) Commodity Price Risk
The Chief Entity does not enter into any contracts to hedge commodity purchase prices.

(d) Credit Risk Exposures
Credit risk represents the loss that would be recognised if counterparties failed to perform as
contracted.
The credit risk on financial assets, excluding investments, of the Chief Entity which have been
recognised in the Statement of Financial Position, is the carrying amount, net of any provision
for doubtful debts.
The Chief Entity does not have significant exposure to any concentration of credit risk.

(e) Net Fair Value of Financial Assets and Liabilities
The net fair value of other monetary financial assets and financial liabilities is based on market
prices where a market exists or by discounting expected future cash flows by the current
interest rates for assets and liabilities with similar risk properties.  Cash flows are discounted
using standard valuation techniques at the applicable market yield having regard to the timing
of the cash flows.  The carrying amount of bank term deposits, accounts receivable, accounts
payable and bank loans approximate net fair value.

1998 1998
Carrying Amount Net fair Value
$000s $000s

Financial Assets
Cash and Deposits 29 198 29 198
Loans 36 712 49 587
Advances 920 920
Grants Receivable 17 641 17 641
Property Sales Receivable 5 668 5 668
Sundry Receivables 4010 4 010

94 149 107 024
Financial Liabilities
Creditors &amp; accruals 17 281 17 281
Borrowings 31 643 43 360

48 924 60 641



117

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH COMMISSION 
STATEMENT BY PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING OFFICER 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 1998

To the best of my knowledge and belief, the financial statements and notes thereto of the Chief
Entity of the South Australian Health Commission present a fair view of the financial position
as at 30 June 1998 and the financial transactions for the year ended on that date.

Dated 30 September, 1998.

F. R. Turner
Director, Budgets

STATEMENT BY 
PRINCIPAL 
ACCOUNTING 
OFFICER

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SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH COMMISSION 
STATEMENT BY CHAIR 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 1998

To the best of my knowledge and belief:

  the financial statements are drawn up so as to present fairly in accordance with South 
Australian Health Commission Accounting Policies and Australian Accounting 
Standards, the financial position of the Chief Entity as at 30 June 1998 and the results of 
its operations and cash flows for the financial year ended on that date.

  Government funding received during the year ended 30 June 1998 has been spent on the 
purposes for which the amounts were advanced.

For and on behalf of the Commission

Dated 30 September 1998.

Christine Charles
Chief Executive
CHAIR,  SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH COMMISSION

STATEMENT BY 
CHAIR

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119

Departm
ent of Hum

an Services
fo

r the period24 O
ctober 1997

to
30 J

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INDEPENDENT AUDIT
REPORT

TO THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE 
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

SCOPE
As required by Section 31 of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987 and Section 25 of the
South Australian Health Commission Act 1976, I have audited the financial report of the South
Australian Health Commission for the year ended 30 June 1998.  
The financial report comprises:-
  An Operating statement;
  A Statement of Financial Position;
  A Statement of Cash Flows;
  Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statement;
  Statement by the Chairperson and the Director, Budgets.

The Board Members are responsible for the preparation and presentation of the financial report
and the information contained therein.  I have conducted an independent audit of the financial
report in order to express an opinion on it to the Chairperson.

The audit has been conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Public Finance and
Audit Act 1987 and Australian Auditing Standards to provide reasonable assurance that the
financial report is free of material misstatement.

Audit procedures included examination, on a test basis, of evidence supporting the amounts
and other disclosures in the financial report, and the evaluation of accounting policies and
significant accounting estimates.  Those procedures were undertaken to form an opinion as to
whether, in all material respects, the financial report is presented fairly in accordance with the
South Australian Health Commission Accounting Standards, Australian Accounting Standards
and other mandatory professional reporting requirements (Urgent Issues Group Consensus
Views) so as to present a view which is consistent with my understanding of the South
Australian Health Commission s financial position, the results of its operations and its cash
flows.

The audit opinion expressed in this report has been formed on the above basis.

Auditor General s Department



QUALIFICATION

The 1997-98 financial statements include comparative figures for the preceding financial year
which were the subject of qualification in the previous year.  That qualification resulted from
limitations in some systems and records, subsidiary to the accrual base general ledger system,
which prevented the production of timely and appropriate information to establish with
sufficient certainty the values ascribed to certain disclosure items within the financial
statements.  The items relate to Interstate Patient Transfers - Operating Expenses (Payables)
and Revenues (Receivables); Budget Variations included under Funding Allocation to
Incorporated Health Services  Operating Expenses (Payables/Receivables); and Employee
Entitlements/Liabilities.

The matters giving rise to the qualification were resolved during the year and as a consequence
disclosures with respect to the 1997-98 financial statement figures are unqualified.

QUALIFIED AUDIT OPINION

In my opinion, except for the effects on the financial report of the matters referred to in the
qualification paragraph, the financial report presents fairly in accordance with the Public
Finance and Audit Act 1987, South Australian Health Commission Authority policies,
applicable Australian Accounting Standards and other mandatory professional reporting
requirements, the financial position of the South Australian Health Commission as at 30 June
1998, the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year ended 30 June 1998.

30 September 1998

K I MacPHERSON
AUDITOR-GENERAL

9th Floor State Administration Centre Victoria Square Adelaide 5000
Telephone (08) 226 9640  Facsimile (08) 226 9688  DX 56208 Victoria Square

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1/07/1997 to 23/10/1997 30/6/1997
$'000 $'000

EXPENSES:
Employee related              5,059      15,684
Supplies and services            7,874      19,118 
Grants &amp; subsidies          74,101    151,971 
Depreciation               527       1,534 
Other                 -               30 

Total Expenses  87,561    188,337 

Operating Revenue
Rent and leases               664        1,586 
Fees &amp; charges               349           884 
Portfolio service fees             5,398      13,257 
Interest               411        2,295 
Dividends - HomeStart Finance               -          7,000 
Other             1,056        1,985 

Total Operating Revenue 7,878      27,007 
Net Cost of Services 79,683    161,330 
Government Revenues

Department Appropriation          74,072     91,881 
Commonwealth grants           11,407    72,201 
Other grants &amp; contributions                -         1,685 

Total Revenues from Government 85,479    165,767 

Net Revenues from Disposalof Non-Current Assets (23)      (110)
Change in Net Assets Before Restructuring 5,773       4,327 

Net Revenues/(Expenses) From Restructuring (494)          425 
Change in Net Assets After Restructuring 5,279        4,752 

The Operating Statement is to be read in conjunction with the notes to and forming part of the
Financial Statements

DEPARTMENT OF
HOUSING AND URBAN
DEVELOPMENT
OPERATING 
STATEMENT
for the period 1 July 1997 to
23 October 1997

Departm
ent of Housing and Urban Deve

opm
ent

fo
r the period 1 J

uly 1997 to 23 O
ctober 1997



122

23/10/1997 30/6/1997
$'000 $'000

Current Assets
Cash on hand and deposit accounts         21,506          29,541
Receivables         83,109          18,033
Inventories                1               -  
Other            273               58  

104,889         47,632 

Non-Current Assets
Receivables          1,074               -  
Plant, equipment and vehicles          1,231           2,979 

Land and buildings         20,167          20,946

22,472          23,925 

Total Assets 127,361          71,557 

Current LiabilitiesPayables 69,811          18,290 
Employee entitlements          1,108           1,517 
Borrowings             378             378 
Other               73              511  

71,370          20,696 
Non-Current Liabilities

Employee entitlements          2,922           2,939 
Borrowings             221   326 
Other            159             186  

3,302        3,451 

Total Liabilities 74,672          24,147 

Total Net Assets  52,689      
47,410 

Equity
ACCUMULATED SURPLUS         52,689          47,410 

Total Equity 52,689          47,410 

The Statement of Financial Position is to be read in conjunction with the notes to and forming
part of the Financial Statements

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
STATEMENT OF 
FINANCIAL POSITION
as at 23 October 1997

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1/07/1997 to 23/10/1997 30/6/1997
$'000 $'000

Cash flows from Operating Activities
Payments

Employee related           (4,914)    (16,302)
Supplies &amp; services          (6,287)    (19,256)
Grants to organisations         (25,916)  (174,994)

Receipts
Sales, fees and charges            2,827       16,271 
Dividends - HomeStart                -           7,000 
Interest                12        2,298 
Other            1,026         4,054 

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities (33,252)  (180,929)
Cash Flows from Investing Activities

Purchase of property, plant &amp; equipment             (402)      (1,722)
Proceeds from sale of property, plant &amp; equipment                  27               5 

Net Cash Flows from Investing Activities (375)      (1,717)
Cash flows from Government

State Government          25,592     110,977 
Commonwealth Government                -        72,792 

Cash flows provided by Government   25,592     183,769 

Cash flows from restructure -            (287)
Net increase (decrease) in cash held (8,035)           836 
Cash at the beginning of the reporting period 29,541       28,705 

Cash at the end of the reporting period 21,506       29,541 

The Statement of Cash Flows is to be read in conjunction with the notes to and forming part of
the Financial Statements.

DEPARTMENT OF
HOUSING AND URBAN
DEVELOPMENT
STATEMENT OF 
CASHFLOWS
for the period 1 July 1997 to
23 October 1997

Departm
ent of Housing and Urban Deve

opm
ent

fo
r the period 1 J

uly 1997 to 23 O
ctober 1997



1. Abolishment of the 
Department of Housing and 
Urban Development

With effect from 23 October 1997 the
Department of Housing and Urban
Development(DHUD) was abolished.  The
functions, together with the assets and
liabilities of the abolished Department, with
the exception of the former Planning Division
of  the Department, were transferred to the
Department of Human Services which was
established on 24 October 1997. The
functions, together with the assets and
liabilities of the former Planning Division of
the Department were transferred to the
Department of Transport, the Arts and Urban
Planning.

Prior to abolishment, the objectives of the
DHUD were to: 
  encourage and assist orderly          

development in accordance with the 
Government s Planning Strategy and the
Development Act 1993

  develop sound policies for efficient and 
effective operations within the portfolio 
including strategic planning,

  develop, negotiate and manage effective 
housing policies under the 
Commonwealth State Housing 
Agreement(CSHA),

  allocate Housing Assistance funds   
consistent with strategic directions 
developed by the Department and jointly
agreed by Commonwealth and State 
Ministers,

  develop sound relationships between 
State and Local Governments,

  manage the West Terrace Heritage 
Cemetery with a view to protecting its 
historical value for present and future 
generations, and

  provide support services to the following
entities; South Australian Housing Trust,
South Australian Community Housing 
Authority, HomeStart Finance, Office of 
Local Government and Department of 
Environment and Natural 
Resources.

2. Statement of Accounting 
Policies 

Accounting Standards
This general purpose financial report has been
prepared in accordance with Australian
Accounting Standards and in particular with
AAS 29 Financial Reporting by Government
Departments, except where the effect of those
standards have been modified by Treasurer s
Instruction 9131, Financial Reporting
Following the Restructure of Public
Authorities.

Reporting Period
This financial report has been prepared for the
period 1July 1997 to 23 October 1997, the
date on which the Department of Housing and
Urban Development was abolished.

Comparative Information
Comparative information reflects the balances
at 30 June 1997 for Statement of Financial
Position items and full financial year balances
for Operating Statement and Statement of
Cash Flow items.

124

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 
NOTES TO AND PART 
OF THE FINANCIAL 
STATEMENT
for the period 1 July 1997 to 
23 October 1997

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3. Notes to the Statement of Cash Flows
(a) Reconciliation of cash
Cash held at the end of the reporting period as shown in the Statement of Cash Flows is
represented by the following balances:

23/10/97
$'000

Special Deposit Account     21,474 
Treasury Imprest Account            10 
Petty cash &amp; cashier floats              7 
Other deposits 15  

21,506 

(b) Reconciliation of Net Cash Used in Operating Activities to Net Cost of Services
1/07/97 to 23/10/1997

$'000
Net Cash Used in Operating Activities     33,252 
Adjustments
Depreciation         527 

Changes in Assets and Liabilities
Increase in Receivables     (4,725)
Increase in Other Current Assets        (215)
Increase in Recurrent Payables     51,818 
Decrease in Employee Entitlements        (426)
Decease in lease incentive        (105)
Decrease in Other Liabilities       (443)

Net Cost of Services 79,683 

Departm
ent of Housing and Urban Deve

opm
ent

fo
r the period 1 J

uly 1997 to 23 O
ctober 1997



126

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 
STATEMENT BY DEPUTY CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER 
FOR THE PERIOD 1 JULY 1997 TO 23 OCTOBER 1997

1. This report comprises the Financial Statements of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development which have been prepared on an accrual accounting basis. In my opinion:
(a) the Operating Statement and the Statement of Cash Flows are drawn up to give a 

true and fair view of the results of the operations and the cash flows of the 
Department for period 1 July 1997 to 23 October 1997;

(b) the Statement of Financial Position has been drawn up to give a true and fair view 
of the state of affairs of the Department as at 23 October 1997.

2. The Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with Statements of 
Accounting Concepts, Applicable Accounting Standards and the Public Finance and 
Audit Act, 1987, as amended.

Signed:

Ian Proctor
Deputy Chief Executive Officer
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

Dated:     27 April 1998

STATEMENT BY 
DEPUTY CHIEF 
EXECUTIVE

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Departm
ent of Housing and Urban Deve

opm
ent

fo
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uly 1997 to 23 O
ctober 1997

TO THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE 
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

In accordance with  Section 31 of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987 I have audited the
financial statements of the Department of Housing and Urban Development for the period
ended 23 October1997.  The financial statements comprise:

  An Operating statement;
  A Statement of Financial Position;
  A Statement of Cash Flows;
  Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statement;
  Certificate by the Deputy Chief Executive.

The Deputy Chief Executive Officer of the Department of Housing and Urban Development is
responsible for the preparation and presentation of the financial statements and the information
contained therein.  An independent audit of the financial statements has been conducted in
order to express an opinion of them to the Deputy Chief Executive Officer.

The audit has been conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Public Finance and
Audit Act 1987 and Australian Auditing Standards to provide reasonable assurance as to
whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement.

Audit procedures included examination, on a test basis, of evidence supporting the amounts
and other disclosures in the financial statements and the evaluation of accounting policies and
significant accounting estimates.  These procedures were undertaken to form an opinion
whether, in all material respects, the financial statements are presented fairly in accordance
with the Treasurer s Instructions promulgated under the provisions of the Public Finance and
Audit Act 1987, appropriate Australian Accounting Standards and other mandatory professional
reporting requirements (Urgent Issues Group Consensus Views ) so as to present a view which
is consistent with my understanding of the Department of Housing and Urban Development s
financial position, the results of its operations and its cash flows.

The audit opinion expressed in this report has been formed on the above basis.

INDEPENDENT AUDIT
REPORT

Auditor General s Department



AUDIT OPINION

In my opinion the financial statements present fairly in accordance with the Treasurer s
Instructions promulgated under the provisions of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987,
appropriate Australian Accounting Standards and other mandatory professional reporting
requirements, the financial position of the Department of Housing and Urban Development as
at 23 October 1997 the results of its operations and its cash flows for the period ended 23
October 1997.

Without qualification to the opinion expressed above, attention is drawn to the fact that
Treasurer s Instruction 9131  Financial Reporting Following Restructuring of Public
Authorities  was issued specifically in relation to financial statements for South Australian
Government Agencies abolished on 23 October 1997.  Note 2 to the financial statements refers
to the application of the instruction.  The instruction provides that detailed notes are not
required to accompany the financial statements for the period ending 23 October 1997.

4 May 1998

K I MacPHERSON
AUDITOR-GENERAL

9th Floor State Administration Centre Victoria Square Adelaide 5000
Telephone (08) 226 9640  Facsimile (08) 226 9688  DX 56208 Victoria Square

128

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Note $'000
Operating Expenses

Employee related 17,565
Supplies and services 5,812
Grants &amp; subsidies 49,077
Client payments 3,308
Depreciation 793 

Total Operating Expenses 76,555 

Operating Revenue
Interest 90 
Other 1,243 

Total Operating Revenue 1,333 

Net Cost of Services 3 (b) 75,222
Government Revenues

Department Appropriation 53,302 
Grants 26,380 

Total Revenues from Government 79,682 

Change in Net Assets 4,460 

The Operating Statement is to be read in conjunction with the notes to and forming part of the
Financial Statements.

DEPARTMENT FOR
FAMILY AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICES
OPERATING 
STATEMENT
for the period 1 July 1997 to 23
October 1997

Departm
ent for Fam

iy and Com
m

unity Services
fo

r the period 1 J
uly 1997 to 23 O

ctober 1997



130

Note $'000
CURRENT ASSETS

Cash on hand and deposit accounts 3(a) 15,929
Receivables 1,955
Other 470

18,354 

NON-CURRENT ASSETS
Capital works in progress 45
Property, plant and equipment 32,576

32,621

TOTAL ASSETS 50,975

CURRENT LIABILITIES
Payables 1,659
Employee entitlements and related provisions 4,886

6,545

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
Employee entitlements and related provisions 10,932
Borrowings 265

11,197

TOTAL LIABILITIES 17,742

TOTAL NET ASSETS 33,233

EQUITY
Asset revaluation reserve 192
Accumulated surplus 33,041

TOTAL EQUITY 33,233 

The Statement of Financial Position is to be read in conjunction with the notes to and forming
part of the Financial Statements.

DEPARTMENT FOR FAMILY
AND COMMUNITY 
SERVICES
STATEMENT OF 
FINANCIAL POSITION
as at 23 October 1997

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Note $'000
Inflow/(Outflow)

Cash flows from Operating Activities
Payments

Employee related (17,388)
Supplies &amp; services (11,026)
Grants to organisations (48,625)
Client payments (3,308)

Receipts
Interest -  
Other 1,470

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities 3(b) (78,877)
Cash Flows from Investing Activities

Purchase of property, plant &amp; equipment (204)
Proceeds from sale of property, plant &amp; equipment -  

Net Cash Flows from Investing Activities (204)
Cash flows from Government

State Government 53,279 
Commonwealth Government 25,779 

Cash flows provided by Government 79,058 
Net increase (decrease) in cash held (23)
Cash at the beginning of the reporting period 15,952 
Cash at the end of the reporting period 3(a) 15,929

The Statement of Cash Flows is to be read in conjunction with the notes to and forming part of
the Financial Statements.

DEPARTMENT FOR 
FAMILY AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICES
STATEMENT OF 
CASH FLOWS
for the period 1 July 1997 to
23 October 1997

Departm
ent for Fam

iy and Com
m

unity Services
fo

r the period 1 J
uly 1997 to 23 O

ctober 1997



1. Abolishment of the 
Department for Family and 
Community Services 

With effect from 23 October 1997 the
Department for Family and Community
Services (FACS) was abolished.
The functions, together with the assets and
liabilities of the abolished Department were
transferred to the Department of Human
Services which was established on 24 October
1997.

Prior to abolishment, the objectives of FACS
were the establishment, encouragement and
coordination of services and facilities
designed to promote the welfare of the
community generally and of individuals,
families and groups within the community.

2. Statement of Accounting 
Policies

Accounting Standards
This general purpose financial report has been
prepared in accordance with Australian
Accounting Standards and in particular with
AAS 29 Financial Reporting by Government
Departments, except where the effect of those
standards have been modified by Treasurer s
Instruction 9131, Financial Reporting
Following the Restructure of Public
Authorities.

Reporting Period
This financial report has been prepared for the
period 1July 1997 to 23 October 1997, the
date on which the Department for Family and
Community Services was abolished.

Recognition of Grant Related Transactions
The Department provides grant monies to
certain external parties which are subject to a
requirement that monies unexpended at
balance date are repayable unless specific
authority is obtained to carry funds to next
financial year or grant period.

The Department does not conduct a balance
day confirmation process with external parties
to determine what unexpended monies should
be repaid. Financial transactions in relation to
grants are recognised on a cash basis.

Comparative Information
Comparative information is not provided due
to the different reporting period duration.

132

DEPARTMENT FOR 
FAMILY AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICES
NOTES TO AND PART OF THE
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
for the period 1 July 1997 to
23 October 1997

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3. Notes to the Statement of Cash Flows
(a) Reconciliation of cash

Cash held at the end of the reporting period as shown in the Statement of Cash Flows 
is represented by the following balances:

$ 000
Special Deposit Accounts 15,663
Advance Accounts 255 
Petty cash &amp; cashier floats 11 

15,929 

(b) Reconciliation of Net Cash Used in Operating Activities to Net Cost of Services
$ 000

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities 78,877
Adjustments
Depreciation 793
Changes in Assets and Liabilities

Increase in Receivables (1,824)
Increase in Other Current Assets (363)
Decrease in Recurrent Payables (3,210)
Increase in Employee Entitlements 949

Net Cost of Services 75,222 

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ent for Fam

iy and Com
m

unity Services
fo

r the period 1 J
uly 1997 to 23 O

ctober 1997



134

4. Administered items
The following revenues, expenditures and assets were administered but not controlled by the
Department.  In accordance with Accounting Standard AAS29 the items have been classified
as "Administered" and have not been included in the Financial Statements.

Schedule of Administered Revenue and Expenditure for the period 1 July 1997 to 23
October 1977

Administered Expenditure $'000
Concessions

Water &amp; Sewerage rates 7,096 
Local Government rates 18,696 
Transport 3,685
Electricity 3,897
Rail Freight for charitable organisations 7 

Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund 627 
Charitable and Social Welfare Fund 1,183 
Family Maintenance Orders 347 

35,538 

Administered Revenues
Concessions 16,447 
Local Government Reform Fund 18,961 
Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund 500 
Charitable and Social Welfare Fund 945 
Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme 92
Family Maintenance Orders 342 

37,287 
Increase (Decrease) in Net Administered 
Assets resulting from Operations 1,749 

Schedule of Administered Assets as at 23 October 1997
Administered Assets
Cash at Bank

Concessions 1,441 
Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund 1,694 
Charitable and Social Welfare Fund 835 
Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme1 21 
Family Maintenance Orders 66 

4,157 

Receivables
Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund - Interest 70 
Concessions 1,936 

2,006 

Total Assets 6,163 

Equity
as at 1 July 1997 4,414 
Net Increase 1,749 
as at 23 October 1997 6,163 

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Departm
ent for Fam

iy and Com
m

unity Services
fo

r the period 1 J
uly 1997 to 23 O

ctober 1997

DEPARTMENT FOR FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES
STATEMENT BY PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING OFFICER 
FOR THE PERIOD 1 JULY 1997 TO 23 OCTOBER 1997

1. This report comprises the Financial Statements of the Department for Family and 
Community Services. In my opinion:
(a) the operating Statement and the Statement of cash Flows are drawn up to give a true 
and fair view of the results of the operations and the cash flows of the Department for the
period 1 July 1997 to 23 October 1997;
(b) the Statement of Financial Position has been drawn up to give a true and fair view of 
the state of affairs of the Department as at 23 October 1997.

2. The Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with Statements of 
Accounting Concepts, applicable Accounting Standards and the Public Finance and 
Audit Act, 1987, as amended.

Signed:

F.R. Turner
Director, Budgets
Department of Human Services

Dated:     28 September 1998

STATEMENT BY 
PRINCIPAL 
ACCOUNTING 
OFFICER



136

DEPARTMENT FOR FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES
STATEMENT BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
FOR THE PERIOD 1 JULY 1997 TO 23 OCTOBER 1997

1. This report comprises the Financial Statements of the Department for Family and 
Community Services. In my opinion:

(a) the operating Statement and the Statement of cash Flows are drawn up to give a true
and fair view of the results of the operations and the cash flows of the Department 
for the period 1 July 1997 to 23 October 1997;

(b) the Statement of Financial Position has been drawn up to give a true and fair view 
of the state of affairs of the Department as at 23 October 1997.

2. The Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with Statements of 
Accounting Concepts, applicable Accounting Standards and the Public Finance and Audit
Act, 1987, as amended.

Signed:

Richard Deyell
Chief Executive Officer
Department for Family and Community Services

Dated:     30 September 1998

STATEMENT BY 
CHIEF EXECUTIVE 
OFFICER

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TO THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE 
DEPARTMENT FOR FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES

In accordance with  Section 31 of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987 I have audited the
financial statements of the Department for Family and Community Services for the period
ended 23 October1997.  The financial statements comprise:

  An Operating statement;
  A Statement of Financial Position;
  A Statement of Cash Flows;
  Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statement;
  Certificate by the Deputy Chief Executive

The Chief Executive is responsible for the preparation and presentation of the financial
statements and the information contained therein.  An independent audit of the financial
statements has been conducted in order to express an opinion of them to the Chief Executive.

The audit has been conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Public Finance and
Audit Act 1987 and Australian Auditing Standards to provide reasonable assurance as to
whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement.

Audit procedures included examination, on a test basis, of evidence supporting the amounts
and other disclosures in the financial statements and the evaluation of accounting policies and
significant accounting estimates.  These procedures were undertaken to form an opinion
whether, in all material respects, the financial statements are presented fairly in accordance
with the Treasurer s Instructions promulgated under the provisions of the Public Finance and
Audit Act 1987, appropriate Australian Accounting Standards and other mandatory professional
reporting requirements (Urgent Issues Group Consensus Views ) so as to present a view which
is consistent with my understanding of the Department of Family and Community Service s
financial position, the results of its operations and its cash flows.

The audit opinion expressed in this report has been formed on the above basis.

Departm
ent for Fam

iy and Com
m

unity Services
fo

r the period 1 J
uly 1997 to 23 O

ctober 1997

INDEPENDENT AUDIT
REPORT

Auditor General s Department



QUALIFICATION
The Department provides grant monies to certain community organisations which are subject
to a requirement that monies unexpended at year end of the grant period are repayable unless
specific authority is obtained to carry funds forward into the next financial year or grant
period.  The Department has not conducted a balance day confirmation process with external
parties to determine what unexpended monies should be repaid and consequently no receivable
has been recognised in the accounts in relation to these funds.

QUALIFIED AUDIT OPINION
In my opinion, except for the effects on the financial report of the matter referred to in the
qualification paragraph, the financial report present fairly in accordance with the Treasurer s
Instructions promulgated under the provisions of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987,
applicable Australian Accounting Standards and other mandatory professional reporting
requirements, the financial position of the Department of Family and Community Services as
at 23 October 1997, the results of its operations and its cash flows for the period ended 23
October 1997.

Attention is drawn to the fact that Treasurer s Instruction 9131  Financial Reporting Following
Restructuring of Public Authorities  was issued specifically in relation to financial statements
for South Australian Government Agencies abolished on 23 October 1997.  Note 2 to the
financial statements refers to the application of the Instruction.  The Instruction provides that
detailed notes are not required to accompany the financial statements for the period ending 23
October 1997.

30 September 1998

K I MacPHERSON
AUDITOR-GENERAL

9th Floor State Administration Centre Victoria Square Adelaide 5000
Telephone (08) 226 9640  Facsimile (08) 226 9688  DX 56208 Victoria Square

138

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APPENDICES
APPENDICES



140

APPENDIX 1-
STATISTICS

HOSPITAL ACTIVITY STATISTICS1

1991-92 1992-93 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98

Average daily 
available beds2 5280 5119 5060 4946 4874 4725 4696

Occupancy rate3 70% 72% 75% 70% 71% 73% 73%

Admissions
Overnight stay 
patients 194 142 193 480 191 104 191 811 191 007 186 820 190 626

Day only patients 77 689 81 579 93 471 108 243 115 725 124 852 135 976

Total admissions 271 831 275 059 284 575 300 054 306 732 311 672 326 602
Admissions/
1000 population4 187 189 194 203 208 210 220
Average length 
of stay5 5.2 5.0 4.9 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.1

Occupied bed days 1 407 528 1 386 235 1 384 989 1 327 567 1 334 187 1 336 473 1 342 230

Non-inpatients6

Casualty 361 933 371 046 377 433 414 369 435 378 438 103 455 659

Outpatients 1 325 436 1 299 362 1 323 714 1 356 247 1 384 580 1 389 401 1 453 209

Notes:
1 This table contains data for all recognised hospitals, including the Pregnancy Advisory 

Centre and Torrens House.
2 The average number of beds available for use by patients in the course of the year.
3 The ratio of occupied beds divided by annual available beds.  This excludes day only 

patients treated in designated day only facilities.
4 Population figures represent the mean resident population of South Australia as estimated

by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.
5 The average number of days all admitted patients spent in hospital, including day only 

patients.

6 The increases in non-admitted patient activity reflect, in part, trends in the use of these 
services and, in part, the results by the Health Commission to improve the quality of data
reported.  It should be noted that the series has changed from reporting attendances at 
outpatient and casualty clinics (for the years 1990-91 to 1992-93) to occasion of service 
at each clinic (from 1993-94).



141

SECURE CARE
The average daily occupancy figure for 1997-98 was 76, representing a 19.15% decrease on
the previous year.

Note: Average daily occupancy is determined by counting all children who were in secure care
at 7.00 am each day of the year.  The previous method, via previous JIS/PC systems inflated
the figures using a different method of calculation. 
Total admissions have remained fairly stable over the last few years.

Aboriginal Other Unknown Total

No % No % No % No

Sentenced 67 19.71 285 27.83 3 12.5 355

Non-sentenced 273 80.29 739 72.19 21 87.5 1033

Total 340 100 1024         100.02 24 100 1388

Aboriginal Other Unknown Total

No % No % No % No %

Detention 16 4.71 92 8.98 3 12.5 111 7.99

Review board
warrant 0 0 1 .10 0 0 1 .07

Return to centre 2 .59 1 .10 0 0 3 .22

Remand 119 35 240 23.44 5 20.83 364 26.22

First instance 
warrant 62 18.24 167 16.31 3 12.5 232 16.72

Police custody 92 27.06 331 32.32 13 54.17 436 31.41

Warrant in 
default 49 14.41 191 18.65 0 0 240 17.29

Total 340 100  1023 100 24 100 1387 100



142

In the 1996-97 financial year secure care had 1585 admissions.  In 1997-98 there were 197
fewer admissions than 1996-97, a decrease of 12.43%.  This relates mostly to orders on
admission but first instance warrants increased from 218 to 232 resulting in a 6.42% increase.

The decrease in average daily occupancy coincides with the decrease of average length of stay.
In 1996-97 average length of custody was 21.6 days compared to 19.8 days for the 1997-98
financial year - this equates to a drop of 8.33%.

Given that the methods used to calculate average daily occupancy give different results, the
figures presented are generally lower than before.  In 1997-98 of the average daily occupancy
of 76, 38 were in custody due to a detention order.  These figures also include 29 people in
remand, three on a police custody order, two in default of outstanding warrants and one on a
first instance warrant.  Detentions have noticeably dropped in numbers - from 57.24 for 1996-
97 to 38.46 for the 1997-98 financial year.

An ongoing issue for secure care still remains the over-representation of Aboriginal young
people.  In particular, the numbers of Aboriginal young women in secure care was an area of
concern during 1997-98.

Aboriginal Other Unknown

Male Female Male Female Male Female Total %

Detention 13 3 88 4 3 0 111 8.00

Remand 88 31 212 28 4 1 364 26.22

First instance 
warrant 50 12 147 20 2 1 232 16.71

Police custody 70 22 277 54 8 5 436 31.41

Warrant in 
default 39 10 169 22 0 0 240 17.29

Other 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.07

Review Board 
warrant 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.07

Return to centre 1 1 1 0 0 0 3 0.22

Total 261 79 896 128 17 7 1388 100

ADOPTIONS



143

ADOPTIONS
Number of registrations on the prospective adopters register (PAR)

Overseas Australia

On PAR AS AT 1.7.97 72 16

New registrations 39 8

Children placed 59 4

Removed from PAR 8 3
(withdrew) (withdrew)

On PAR as at 30.6.98 60 17

Number of adoptions orders granted

1997-98

Placement adoption (Aust born) 4
Placement adoption(special needs) 1
Placement adoption (intercountry) 38
Particular child adoption (eg step-parent) 5
Particular child (eg foster) 0
Particular child (intercountry) 1

Applications for Adoption Information Lodged in 1997-98

People who were party to an adoption prior to the commencement of the Adoption Act 1988
can apply for information about their adoption once the adopted person is 18 years old. Since
its commencement in 1988 over 6000 such applications have been received by Adoption and
Family Information Service.

Adopted person 435

Adoptive parents 1

Birth parents 132

Other birth relatives 44

TOTAL 612

Under the Adoption Act 1988 parties to adoptions that occurred before the commencement of
this Act (once the adopted person is 18 years old) can apply to restrict the release of
identifying information about themselves to other parties.



144

Lodgements of New Identifying Information Vetoes

Adopted persons 15

Adoptive parents 11

Birth parents 7

TOTAL 33

Renewal of Identifying Information Vetoes

Adopted persons 39

Adoptive parents 0

Birth parents 32

Other birth relatives 6

TOTAL 77

Child Protection  -  Notifications 1991-92 to 1997-98



145

Child Protection - Number of Notifications by age and gender

Age of child Male Female Unknown TOTAL
Under 1 year 331 340 10 681 
1 year 340 305 7 652
2 years 337 368 4 709
3 years 370 418 3 791
4 years 402 408 1 811
5 years 422 401 2 825
6 years 458 396 4 858
7 years 440 378 1 819
8 years 417 350 1 768
9 years 354 366 4 724
10 years 397 283 3 683
11 years 308 286 3 597
12 years 222 298 1 521
13 years 208 316 1 525
14 years 164 291 2 457
15 years 96 204 2 302
16 years and over 92 215 1 308
Unknown 300 294 26 620
TOTAL 5 658 5 917 76 11 651

Child Protection - Notifications by Source of Notification

Source No. Source No.

Child 200 Hospital CP Service 95

Parent; Guardian 1 545 Other Medical Person 102

Other Relative 1 228 FACS Worker 235

Friend; Neighbour 1 498 Other Social/Health/Welfare 1226

School; Kin/Day Care    2 680 Police 1 018

Family Day Care 118 Anonymous 445

Doctor 385 Other 876

Total 11 651



Community Benefit South
Australia
The Charitable and Social Welfare Fund was
established under section 73B of the Gaming
Machines (Miscellaneous) Act (1996) to
distribute funds from gaming machine taxes
by providing financial assistance to charitable
and social welfare organisations.
The fund, which has been given the public
name of Community Benefit SA, operates
under the direction of a board appointed by
the Minister for Human Services and is
allocated $3 million annually. The fund is
independent of Government and, in
accordance with the Act, the Board has the
authority to approve funding to non-
government charitable and social welfare
organisations.
Community Benefit SA allocates one-off
funding for normal grants up to $25 000 for
community service projects which assist
families and people in need and fundraising
projects which enable organisations to
develop strategies to increase their annual
revenue.

During 1997-98 a special grants provision
($25 001 to $75 000) was introduced to fund
charities for projects which support high
priority community services. Total funding for
special grants is limited to $600 000 per year
and drawn from the $3 million annual allocation.
A total of 117 projects worth $1 080 000
were funded from round 3 in July 1997 from
rolled over funds from 1996-97. In 1997-98,
249 one-off projects were funded worth
$2 850 000. A total of 366 individual projects
submitted by 280 agencies were funded to a
value of $3 930 000 during the period.
During 1997-98 an independent review of the
fund was undertaken which concluded that it
was operating in an effective manner and was
achieving the purpose as outlined in the Act.
Recommendations were made for minor
improvements and further developments for
the Fund.
Project evaluations undertaken during 1997-
98 indicated that a range of positive benefits
has been achieved for many disadvantaged

people and community building, involvement
and networking have been enhanced.

Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund
Program
The Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund Program
distributes funds contributed annually by the
Australian Hotels Association and Licensed
Clubs Association, through the Independent
Gaming Corporation.  The program funds a
range of regional, Aboriginal and non-English
speaking gamblers  rehabilitation services as
well as a specialist therapeutic service to
support individuals and their families
experiencing problems associated with the use
of electronic gaming machines.

Funding was also provided for a range of
other initiatives to enhance the system of
gamblers rehabilitation services including:
  a community education campaign aimed

at increasing awareness of and access to 
rehabilitation services;

  research into the role of self-help in 
assisting gamblers and their families;

  research into appropriate therapeutic and
community education models of      
intervention for Aboriginal problem 
gamblers; 

  the operation of a free call 1800 number 
for those seeking information and access
to rehabilitation services.

The Gamblers Rehabilitation Fund Committee
provides advice to the Minister for Human
Services on policy and purchasing matters
relevant to the program.  The fund is
administered by the Department of Human
Services. In 1997-98 $490 500 was allocated
to metropolitan services and $317 500 to
country services in South Australia. Funding
was also allocated to specialist services such
as Aboriginal and ethno-specific services,
program coordination, research, community
education and a specialist therapeutic service. 

Further Information
Detailed information on allocations from the
Community Benefit Fund, the Gamblers
Rehabilitation Fund, Alternative Care, the
Supported Accommodation Assistance
Program and the Family and Community
Development Program is available from the
Department of Human Services.

146

APPENDIX 2 -
SPECIAL PROGRAM
FUNDING


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