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1 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



Table of Contents 
 
 

1. Purpose   Have Your Say ............................................................................... 4 
2. Introduction ....................................................................................................... 6 
2.1 What is Oral Health? ........................................................................................ 6 

2.2 What Determines Oral Health? ....................................................................... 6 

2.3 Funding Arrangements for Oral Health in South Australia ........................... 6 

2.4 The Oral Health Workforce in South Australia ............................................... 8 

2.5 Public Dental Service Infrastructure................................................................ 9 

3. Framework for the South Australian Oral Health Plan................................ 10 
3.1 The Current National Oral Health Plan ......................................................... 10 

3.1.1 National Oral Health Plan Baseline Report .................................................. 11 

3.2 Links with Wider SA Health Plans ................................................................. 12 

3.2.1 SA Health Strategic Plan................................................................................ 12 

3.2.2 SA Health Policy for Aboriginal Health ......................................................... 12 

4. Overview of Oral Health Status in South Australia ..................................... 13 
4.1 Children............................................................................................................ 13 

4.2 Adults ............................................................................................................... 14 

4.3 Potentially Preventable Hospitalisations ...................................................... 16 
4.4 Oral cancers .................................................................................................... 17 

4.5 Other Groups................................................................................................... 17 

5. Programs Supporting Oral Health in South Australia ................................. 18 
5.1 Private Dental Sector...................................................................................... 18 

5.2  Public Dental Sector   SA Dental Service.................................................... 18 

5.2.1 Services for Children - School Dental Service ................................................ 18 

5.2.2 General and Emergency Services for Adults - the Community Dental Service 

and Adelaide Dental Hospital ........................................................................ 19 

5.2.3 Specialist Care - The Adelaide Dental Hospital .............................................. 20 

5.3 Public Hospitals .............................................................................................. 20 

5.4 Targeted Programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People ....... 20 

2 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



5.5 Academic, Education and Research Sectors ............................................... 21 

5.5.1 University of Adelaide .................................................................................... 21 
5.5.2 Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health ............................. 22 
5.5.3  TAFE ............................................................................................................... 22 
5.6 Water Fluoridation .......................................................................................... 22 

5.7 Health and Oral Health Promotion ................................................................ 23 

5.7.1 Tooth-brushing ............................................................................................... 23 
6. South Australia s Oral Health Plan 2010-2017 Achievements .................. 23 
7. Attachments .................................................................................................... 24 
Attachment 1 ................................................................................................................ 25 
Baseline report of 26 National Key Performance Indicators, Healthy Mouths 

Health Lives   Australia s National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024. ............. 25 

Attachment 2 ................................................................................................................ 28 
What Has Been Achieved Under South Australia s Oral Health Plan 2010-2017 . 28 

 
 
 
  

3 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



1. Purpose   Have Your Say 
Have your say about the future of oral health in South Australia and how this should 
be reflected in South Australia s Oral Health Plan. 
The aim of South Australia s Oral Health Plan (SAOHP) is to improve the oral health 
of South Australians, in particular those groups most at risk of poor oral health.   
South Australia s inaugural Oral Health Plan outlined the Governments plan for oral 
health care for the seven year period from 2010-2017.    
The next plan is being developed within the framework of the National Oral Health 
Plan - Healthy Mouths Healthy Lives 2015-2024 (NOHP) and the SA Health 
Strategic Plan and will identify strategies that support South Australians to have:  

  Good oral health as part of their general health and well-being 
  Access to private or public oral health care provided by the right provider at 

the right time in the right place at a cost they can afford. 
This Consultation Paper provides an overview of the oral health issues for the South 
Australian population. Responses to this paper are invited from all stakeholders, 
including: 

  community organisations and the general community  
  community and health service providers, 
  the private dental sector  
  dental academics and researchers  
  peak and professional bodies  
  government agencies  

 
 
You are encouraged to participate in the development of the next SAOHP by 
sharing this consultation paper with relevant stakeholders in your network  
and providing feedback on the consultation questions using the attached  
template.  
 
 
  

4 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



 
The specific consultation questions you are asked to respond to are:   
 

Consultation Question 1 
What are the highest priority oral health issues that need to be addressed in the 
coming 5 years? 
 
 

Consultation Question 2 
Are there any gaps that need to be addressed in the next SAOHP? 
 

 

 

 

Consultation Question 3 
Are there any unidentified barriers to the achievement of good oral health in South 
Australia? 
 

 

 

Consultation Question 4 
Are other comments 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Submissions or written feedback should be submitted by post or email to: 
Dr Geoff Franklin 
Executive Director, SA Dental Service 
Level 6, Roma Mitchell House 
GPO Box 864  
ADELAIDE SA 5001 
Email: HEALTHSAOralHealthPlan@sa.gov.au 
 
All submissions must be received by close of business, Friday 27 July 2018    

5 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 




2. Introduction  

2.1 What is Oral Health? 
The World Health Organisation defines oral health as: 

 
 Oral health is essential to general health and well-being and greatly 
influences quality of life. It is defined as a state of being free from mouth and 
facial pain, oral diseases and disorders that limit an individual s capacity in 
biting, chewing, smiling, speaking and psychosocial well-being.  1 
 

As described in the NOHP 2015-2024 - Healthy Mouths Healthy Lives2  
  the major oral diseases that cause poor oral health are dental caries (dental 

decay), periodontal (gum) disease and oral cancers   
  oral diseases are amongst the most common and costly health problems 

experienced by Australians 
  oral disease is a prevalent and chronic disease  

2.2 What Determines Oral Health? 
Health, including oral health, is determined by a complex interaction of many factors.   
Health determinants include social, economic, environmental, political behavioural, 
biological and cultural factors3.  
 
Access to health care, utilisation of dental services, oral health literacy, knowledge 
and attitudes towards oral health and disease can impact the quality of an 
individual s oral health. 
 
Socio-economic factors have a profound influence on oral health with research 
showing a strong link between income and the risk of poor oral health.  Socio- 
economic status affects a person s ability to access dental services and to pay for 
preventive products. Socio- economic status is also linked with levels of sugar, 
tobacco and alcohol consumption which in turn impacts oral health as: 

  consumption of high levels of sugar increases the risk of tooth decay 
  consumption of tobacco increases the risk of gum disease and oral cancer 
  increased levels of alcohol consumption increases the risk of oral cancer. 4 

 
There are shared or common risk factors between oral health and a number of other 
chronic diseases such as obesity, heart disease, cancer and stroke.  It is 
increasingly being recognised that many chronic diseases share underlying causes 
and risk factors and that common prevention strategies can be appropriate. 5 

2.3 Funding Arrangements for Oral Health in South Australia 
Total expenditure on dental services has increased slightly in recent years with the 
most recent AIHW Report on Australia s Health Expenditure showing expenditure 
has increased by between 3% and 5% each year from $457m in 2012/13 to $512m 
by 2015/16. 

1 http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/disease-prevention/oral-health  Accessed 04 May 2018 
2 National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024 Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives, Australian Government  ISBN 978-0-646-
94487-6 
3 ibid 
4 ibid 
5 ibid 

6 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                




Data Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.6 
 
Funding arrangements for oral health in South Australia have remained relatively 
stable over the past several years: 

  Commonwealth Government funding 23% to 27%,  
  the State Government funding between 10% and 15%,  
  Health Insurance funding 27% to 30%, and  
  individuals funding (out of pocket costs) 32%-33%  

 
The proportion of out of pocket costs for individuals for dental care is consistently 
higher than all other health services both nationally and in SA. 

 
Data Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2014-15. 

6 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2017. Health Expenditure Australia 2015-16. Health and welfare 
expenditure series no. 58., and  Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2016. Health Expenditure Australia 
2014-15. Health and welfare expenditure series no. 57 

27% 23% 26% 25% 

14% 15% 10% 12% 

27% 28% 29% 30% 

32% 33% 33% 32% 

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16

Percentage of Total Dental Expenditure SA 2012-2016 

Other

Individual

Health Insurance Funds

State and Local Govt

Aust Govt and Health Insurance
Rebates

 $457  

 $470  

 $494  

 $512  

 $420

 $440

 $460

 $480

 $500

 $520

2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16

Total Dental Expenditure SA 2012-2016  

Total $ Million

$ Million 

7 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                



2.4 The Oral Health Workforce in South Australia 
The oral health workforce comprises registered dental practitioners (dental 
hygienists, dental prosthetists, dental specialists, dental therapists, dentists, and oral 
health therapists) and non-registered dental assistants and dental technicians.7  
These staff are supported by a range of other members of the dental team including 
reception and sterilisation staff. More broadly the oral health workforce interacts with 
a wide range of other health and health related disciplines including for example 
radiology, pathology, nursing and medical.   
 
Prior to 2004, there was a projected shortage of oral health workforce in Australia.  
Since 2004, policy and program changes have resulted in a considerable increase in 
undergraduate training and the number of dental practitioners.8  Nationally, dental 
practitioner numbers increased from approximately 14,000 in 2003 to nearly 21,000 
in 2014.9 
 
There is limited data available on non-registered members of the oral health 
workforce. It is recognised that an appropriate supply of dental assistants and dental 
technicians is critical to the delivery of safe and efficient dental services.10   
 
South Australia compares favourably to the rest of the nation with a relatively higher 
number of dental practitioners per 100,000 population. 
 

 
 
Whilst the growth in practitioner numbers has increased over the past decade there 
is an inequitable geographic distribution of the workforce with lower levels of 
registered clinically active practitioners per 100,000 population.  
 
People living in regional and remote areas have greater access problems with longer 
distances to travel and longer waiting periods as a result of fewer practitioners per 
capital population in these areas11.   
 

The picture in South Australia is very similar with substantially lower levels of dental 
workforce in remote and very remote areas of the State compared with the major 
cities. 
 

7 National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024 Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives, Australian Government  ISBN 978-0-646-
94487- 
8 ibid 
9 ibid 
10 ibid 
11COAG Health Council Performance Monitoring Report  Baseline Report 2017. 

8 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                



 
2.5 Public Dental Service Infrastructure 
The inaugural SAOHP identifies a network of high quality public dental clinics as 
being central to the provision of public dental services and further states it is 
important for the attraction and retention of high quality clinical staff. 
 
Significant progress has been made over the past 10 years with new clinics and/or 
substantial upgrades of existing clinics including: 

Parks,      Port Lincoln,  
Whyalla,      Port Pirie West,  
Wallaroo,      the Riverland,  
Mt Gambier,      Murray Bridge,  
Elizabeth,      Marion,  
Modbury,      Noarlunga,  
Marleston,     Prospect,  
Mitcham,     Fulham Gardens, 
Magill,      Gilles Plains (TAFESA), 
Linden Park,      Ceduna and   
the Adelaide Dental Hospital.  

 
Many of the new clinics are located within community based health care centres, 
hospitals or wider health precincts. 
 
A number of clinics across the State have not been upgraded since they were 
established in the 1970 s. SA Dental Service will be developing a 10 year capital 
works plan for consideration to address metropolitan and country areas of the State 
with outdated infrastructure. 

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2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



3. Framework for the South Australian Oral Health Plan  

3.1 The Current National Oral Health Plan 
The NOHP is based on two national goals, four guiding principles, six foundation 
areas and four priority population groups. 

 

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2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



The NOHP is based on four Guiding Principles reflecting best practise approaches. 

 
 
It is envisaged the Goals and Principles of the National Oral Health Plan will be 
adopted in the new SAOHP. 
 

3.1.1 National Oral Health Plan Baseline Report 
The first Performance Monitoring Report of the NOHP 2015-2024 was provided to 
the Community Care and Population Health Principal Committee, a sub-committee of 
the Australian Health Ministers  Advisory Council in 2017. 
 
The Report is a baseline report of 26 National Key Performance Indicators.  
Progress is expected to be reported every two years. The Executive Summary of the 
Baseline Report 2017 is provided at Attachment 1 for reference.  
 
 

 

11 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



3.2 Links with Wider SA Health Plans 

3.2.1 SA Health Strategic Plan 
It is expected the new SAOHP will align with and reflect SA Health Strategic Plan 
2017-2020, recognising the wider health systems strategic directions and context. 
The Vision of the Government for SA Health and the three roles of SA Health are 
defined in the plan as shown below.   
 

  
 

3.2.2 SA Health Policy for Aboriginal Health  
Programs and service responses should align with SA Health policy and principles in 
relation to Aboriginal health12.  This includes but is not limited to: 

 

 
 

  Aboriginal Health Care 
Plan 2010-2016 
 

  SA Health Aboriginal 
Workforce Framework 
2017-2022 
 

  Use of Aboriginal Health 
Impact Statements 
 

  DHA and LHN  
Reconciliation Action 
Plans. 

 

12 http://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/aboriginal+health Accessed 05 May 2018 
 

12 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                




4. Overview of Oral Health Status in South Australia 

4.1 Children 
DMF(T) index is the total number of Decayed, Missing or Filled Permanent Teeth 
and is a measure of tooth decay experience; 12 year old DMF(T) rates are 
recognised as an international measure for child oral health. 
 
Water fluoridation, use of fluoride toothpaste and regular dental care focussed on 
prevention and early intervention led to major reductions in dental decay among 
South Australian children from the 1970 s through to the 1990 s. The 12 year old 
DMF(T) of South Australian children enrolled in the SDS decreased steadily from 4.5 
in 1977 to 0.47 by 1996. However, over the next decade 12 yr old DMF(T) rates lost 
some of the gains made in earlier years and rates doubled to 1.05 by 2008.  
 
Stemming the decline in child oral health was one of the 11 themes of the inaugural 
SAOHP. As a result of deliberate and sustained activities, good progress has been 
made and DMF(T) of children enrolled in the SDS has shown substantial 
improvement in recent years.  

 
Source: SA Dental Service Evaluation Unit: unpublished data (2018) 
 
However the National Child Oral Health Survey 2012-2014 demonstrated that the 
gains have not been consistent across all age groups, and a high prevalence of 
dental decay in particular socio-economic, geographic and demographic groups.  
 
South Australia and the ACT, have the lowest prevalence and severity of dental 
decay in the child population across the States and Territories. Nationally, ,and in SA 
there is a higher prevalence and severity of untreated dental decay and total decay 
experience among children: 

  identified as Indigenous,  
  from families where parents had school  level education,  
  in low household income,  
  living in remote or very remote areas  
  whose last dental visit was for a problem (rather than a check-up). 13 

13 Chapter 5 Oral Health of Australian Children: the National Child Oral Health Study 2012-2014- Adelaide: 
University Press  

13 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                



4.2 Adults 
For adults and young people aged 15 years and over, the most recent national 
population wide data is from the National Study of Adult Oral Health (NSAOH) 2004-
2006. A new National study commenced in 2017. South Australian population wide 
data is not available and therefore national data is used. 
 
More than one quarter (26%) of the national population have one or more teeth with 
untreated decay; over one fifth (22%) of older people aged over 65 years have 
untreated decay. Only one in ten (10%) of adults have never had  dental decay and 
just under one quarter of adults have moderate to severe periodontal disease with 
the prevalence increasing with age, with over half of Australians aged 65 years and 
over having moderate to severe periodontal disease. 
 

 
Source: NOHMG Report (COAG Health Council) 
 
As described in the NOHP, evidence shows that adults who are socially 
disadvantaged or on a low income have more than double the rate of poor oral 
health than those on higher incomes, including higher rates of untreated dental 
decay and higher rates of tooth loss. People on low incomes continue to have less 
favourable patterns of dental visiting patterns than higher income households. The 
cost of dental care is frequently reported to be a barrier to accessing care; 
concession card holders significantly more likely to have avoided or delayed care 
due to cost and report cost as an issue preventing recommend treatment.14 
 
While public dental services would ideally provide a comprehensive safety net for 
access to dental care, the reality is that only a small proportion of adults access the 
public system and waiting times can be long.15  For example in a two year timeframe 
the South Australian Dental Service treated approximately 23% of the total eligible 
adult population, which is close to the national average of approximately 21%.  
 

14  National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024 Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives, Australian Government  ISBN 978-0-
646-94487 
15 ibid 

14 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                



 
 
In South Australia, public general adult restorative waiting lists have improved in the 
past decade with less people waiting less time for general restorative care. 
 

 
Source: SA Dental Service Evaluation Unit: unpublished data (2018) 
 
The NOHP incorporates people who are socially disadvantaged or on low incomes 
as one of the four priority population groups and includes three key strategies for this 
population group. It is expected these strategies will form part of the SAOHP. 
 
  

15 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



4.3 Potentially Preventable Hospitalisations  
Potentially preventable Hospitalisations (PPHs) represent preventable conditions 
where hospitalisation could be avoided if timely and adequate non-hospital care had 
been provided. 
 
Nationally, dental decay is the third highest cause of potentially preventable 
hospitalisations16.  In South Australia dental problems are the most common 
potentially preventable condition in South Australia as seen in the below graph.17 
 

 
 

Source: Protect, Prevent, Improve - The Chief Public Health Officer s Report 2012-2014 
 
Nationally and in South Australia, children in the 0-9 year age group experience the 
highest rate of PPHs.  Dental decay is the main oral health problem that results in 
the PPH in this age group and most of the treatment for dental caries in young 
children involves a general anaesthetic which are resource intensive and involve 
some risk.18 
  

16 National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024 Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives, Australian Government  ISBN 978-0-646-
94487 
17 Protect, Prevent, Improve - The Chief Public Health Officer s Report 2012-2014 
18 National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024 Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives, Australian Government  ISBN 978-0-646-
94487 

16 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                



4.4 Oral cancers 
Oral cancer may affect lips, tongue, salivary glands, gums, mouth or throat and is the 
eighth most common cancer in Australia.19  Oral cancer is more common among 
older age groups, men (two thirds higher than women) and Aboriginal and Torres 
Strait Islander people (three times higher than the rest of the Australian population). 
The risk of oral cancer is associated with lifestyle choices such as tobacco, alcohol 
consumption and human papillomavirus infection. 20 
 
In 2013, of the 124,000 new cases of cancer diagnosed across Australia, just over 
3,000 were oral cancers.21 Early detection of oral cancer markedly improves the five-
year survival rate but many oral cancers are not diagnosed until they are in the 
advanced stages with significantly higher mortality rates.22 
 
The NOHP identifies dental practitioners as having an important role to play in early 
screening and detection of oral cancers.  

4.5 Other Groups 
The NOHP identifies four priority populations. These groups experience poor oral 
health at higher rates than other sectors of the population. The NOHP includes the 
following table which summarises a few elements with respect to the priority 
populations. 

 
The NOHP calls for 16 key strategies for the 4 priority populations. It is expected 
these strategies will form part of the SAOHP. 

19 National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024 Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives, Australian Government  ISBN 978-0-646-
94487 
20 ibid 
21 ibid  
22 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2016. Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality (ACIM) books: 
head and neck including lip cancer. Canberra: AIHW. 

17 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                



5. Programs Supporting Oral Health in South Australia 

5.1 Private Dental Sector 
The private dental sector offers oral health care to adults and children and is the only 
place non-concession card holder adults can access dental care. A comprehensive 
range of services is provided in the private sector, including emergency and general 
dental care as well as more complex and costly treatments such as orthodontic and 
endodontic services.23  
 
Both nationally and in South Australia the private dental sector is the largest provider 
of oral health care.. For example nationally 84.4% of people who visited a dental 
practice in the last 12 months visited a private dental practice and 13.7% visited a 
public dental clinic with 1.9% visiting other dental providers.24   South Australia has a 
slightly higher rate of public sector attendance (14.3%). People with higher 
household incomes and private health insurance are more likely to report visiting a 
private dental practice than those with lower household incomes or those without 
insurance. 25  However, concession card holders also tend to access private dental 
care, with approximately two thirds of card holders visiting private dentists. 26   
 
In 2015/16 in South Australia the vast majority of dollars invested by the 
Commonwealth Government ($128m), private health insurance companies ($153m), 
and individual out of pocket costs ($165m) occurred in the private dental sector with 
$60m invested by the State Government on public dental care.  
 

5.2  Public Dental Sector   SA Dental Service 
SA Dental Service operates the majority of public dental services in South Australia 
as part of SA Health, under the Central Adelaide Local Health Network.  
 
SA Dental Service provides a range of dental services for children under 18 years 
and eligible adults at clinics throughout South Australia. SA Dental Service works in 
partnership with the University of Adelaide to educate and train many of the state s 
dental professionals, including dentists and oral health therapists. 
 

5.2.1 Services for Children - School Dental Service 
The School Dental Service offers universal access to public dental services for all SA 
children under 18 years who live or go to school in South Australia. As at March 
2018, 139,900 children are enrolled in the School Dental Service.   
 
The School Dental Service provides comprehensive general oral health care in line 
with public oral health principles, with a focus on prevention and early intervention.  
Oral health risk assessment is undertaken for all enrolled children. Enrolled children 
are offered recall examinations at a period commensurate with their level of risk for 
oral disease. Individuals and child population groups at higher risk of oral diseases 
are identified and receive targeted care packages.   

23 Report of the National Advisory Council on Dental Health. 2012. 
24 AIHW: Chrisopoulos S, Harford JE &amp; Ellershaw A 2016. Oral health and dental care in Australia: key facts and 
figures 2015.  Cat. No. DEN 229. Canberra. AIHW. 
25 ibid 
26 Report of the National Advisory Council on Dental Health. 2012. 

18 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                



Dental care is free for all babies, all children not yet at school and most children and 
young people under 18 years.  
 
General Anaesthetics are required for some  children with extensive oral health care 
needs and these are provided both at local hospitals by SA Dental Service dentists 
and under contractual arrangements with the Department of Paediatric Dentistry of 
the Women s and Children s Hospital.    
 
The Children s Population Oral Health Program aims to improve the oral health of 
children aged 0-5, in particular those with risk factors that increase their chance of 
developing Early Childhood Caries, through  Lift the Lip  screening and referral to 
dental services.  This has contributed to more than 14,000 children under 5 years 
old, being seen per year since 2012. 
 
Dental services are provided by teams of dentists, dental therapists and dental 
assistants together with dental students and a range of clinical support staff at clinics 
throughout South Australia. In some remote areas of the State, SA Dental Service 
utilises private sector dental providers to provide School Dental Service care under a 
capitation funding model. SA Dental Service staff also provide services in some 
remote areas not covered by private dentists. 
 

5.2.2 General and Emergency Services for Adults - the Community Dental 
Service and Adelaide Dental Hospital  
The Community Dental Service (CDS) and the Adelaide Dental Hospital (ADH) 
provide oral health care to low-income earning adults with eligibility for care limited to 
current holders (and adult dependents) of Centrelink Concession Cards and 
Department of Veterans Affairs or Pensioner Concession Cards. As at December 
2017, 469,550 adults were eligible to attend the CDS and ADH27.  
 
Emergency (or urgent) and routine dental services are provided to eligible adults. 
Urgent needs are assessed and clients are offered care within a clinically acceptable 
timeframe while routine care is provided after recourse to a waiting list. Modest client 
fees apply for most services with certain preventive items provided at no cost.  
 
Dental services are provided by teams of dentists, dental therapists and dental 
assistants together with dental students and a range of clinical support staff at clinics 
throughout South Australia. Service provision is supplemented by private dentists 
through a range of schemes such as the Emergency Dental Scheme, General 
Dental Scheme, Pensioner Denture Scheme, Prisoner Dental Scheme and the 
Aboriginal Dental Scheme.  
 
A range of high risk adult population groups receive targeted priority care.  These 
groups include Aboriginal people (see section 6.4), people with significant medical 
conditions where their oral health impacts on their general health, people living in 
Supported Residential Facilities and people experiencing homelessness. Small 
programs also exist in some metropolitan areas for frail community living older 
people and some residential aged care facilities.  
 

27 https://data.gov.au/dataset/dss-payment-demographic-data Accessed 04 May 2018 

19 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                




Services are also provided to prisoners by SA Dental Service teams working with 
Prison Health Services. SA Dental Service staff also provide services in some 
remote areas of the State not covered by private dentists. 
 

5.2.3 Specialist Care - The Adelaide Dental Hospital 
Specialist services are provided in the Adelaide Dental Hospital (ADH) by a 
combination of salaried salaried specialist staff, teams of dentists, dental hygienists 
and dental assistants together with visiting specialists, academic staff of the 
University and postgraduate students in specialty training programs. A small number 
of specialist services are outsourced to private specialist providers. Specialist dental 
services are more complex with services mostly provided on referral from general 
dental providers. 
 
The range of specialty services provided at the ADH include: Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery; Orthodontics (braces); Endodontics (root canal); Periodontics (gum 
conditions); Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics (dentures, crowns, bridges) and 
Special Needs Dentistry for people with a range of complex medical, physical or 
intellectual disabilities. SA Dental Service provides a limited range and number of 
these complex specialist dental services. A small number of specialist services are 
provided in community dental clinics.  
 

5.3 Public Hospitals 
Flinders Medical Centre operates a small dental clinic that provides dental care for 
inpatients. 
 
The Women s and Children s Hospital operates a tertiary specialist paediatric dental 
unit. The Unit works cooperatively with SA Dental Service and the University of 
Adelaide in the provision of public specialist dental services for children and 
education and training of paediatric dental specialists.  The Women s and Children s 
Hospital incorporates the Australian Cranio Facial Unit, a national centre of 
excellence it its field.  This Unit treats people with a wide range of rare and/or 
complex anomalies which affect the head and face. 
 
The Royal Adelaide Hospital and SA Dental Service operate a joint specialist Oral 
and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit in partnership with the University of Adelaide which 
includes education and training of Oral and Maxillofacial surgeons. 
 

5.4 Targeted Programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 
People  

Since the mid 2000 s SA Dental Service has developed a number of strategies to 
increase the number of Aboriginal people accessing publicly funded dental care in 
South Australia. 
 
The Aboriginal Oral Health Program uses multiple strategies to address a broad 
range of issues that might prevent Aboriginal people from accessing dental care and 
achieving good oral health (e.g. cost, health literacy, cultural appropriateness). 
Closing the Gap funding is used to employ Aboriginal project staff to raise 
awareness of oral health and community engagement and access to dental services. 

20 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



As a result the number of Aboriginal adults and children seen by SA Dental Service 
has increased significantly over the past ten years.  

  
Source: SA Dental Service Evaluation Unit: unpublished data (2018) 
 
The Aboriginal Health Council provides funding to SA Dental Service that contributes 
to clinical care for Aboriginal people in rural and remote areas. 
 
SA Dental Service works in partnership with the following organisations, providing 
funding for dental programs operated by: 

  Tullawon Health Service based in the Yalata community 
  Nganampa Health Service in the APY lands 
  Nunkuwarrin Yunti in Adelaide. 

5.5 Academic, Education and Research Sectors 

5.5.1 University of Adelaide  
The University of Adelaide provides undergraduate training for dentists and oral 
health therapists as well as a range of post graduate specialist clinical discipline 
training and other post graduate courses. Student oral health practitioners gain most 
of the clinical experience in South Australian Dental Service clinics. 
 
In 2015 the South Australian Government and the University of Adelaide entered into 
a 30 year partnership agreement.  The primary objectives for the Partnership are:  

  to deliver an innovative and integrated model of high quality education and 
Public Oral Health Care 

  to optimise Public Oral Health Care outcomes, clinical placement educational 
opportunities and the use of public dental infrastructure;  

  to provide a sustainable oral health workforce for South Australia;  
  to align the delivery of Public Oral Health Care with the State Health Plan in 

particular the strategic direction of Strengthening Primary Health Care; and  
  to provide suitable clinical placements to Dental Students (as part of the 

Partnership, without additional charge) to enable the completion of their 
program of study.   

 
In 2013, undergraduate and post graduate students of the University of Adelaide 
contributed 155,340, or around 11%-12% of the total clinical items of care provided 
by SA Dental Service.  Under the partnership agreement this volume clinical of care 
is to be maintained. 
 
The University of Adelaide via its Community Outreach Dental Program provides 
dental and other health services for people experiencing homelessness or have 
difficulty accessing conventional care at the Common Ground complex in Light 

21 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



Square. Services are provided by University of Adelaide staff, students, private 
dentists and allied health professional who volunteer their time. 

 

5.5.2 Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health 
The Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health (ARCPOH) is Australia s 
pre-eminent population oral health research body undertaken dental research and 
provides a broad range of dental and oral health statistics.28 ARCPOH was 
establishes at The University of Adelaide in 2001 to undertake research and 
research training in population oral health that is internationally recognised to be of 
the highest quality.  
 
ARCPOH s stakeholders, in addition to the University, include government agencies, 
dental organisations and private corporations. ARCPOH incorporates the Dental 
Statistics and Research Unit, the Health Services Research Unit, the Dental Practice 
Education Research Unit, the Indigenous Oral Health Unit and the Oral Health 
Promotion Clearing House.  
 
ARCPOH in partnership with the Commonwealth Depart of Health and 
State/Territory Health Departments is currently conducting the National Study of 
Adult Oral Health 2017-2018.  Previous national child and adult studies have also 
been led by ARCPOH. 

5.5.3  TAFE 
TAFE SA provides training for dental hygienists, dental technicians and dental 
assistants. Courses in radiography and practice management are also offered by 
TAFE SA.  TAFE SA and SA Dental Service work collaboratively to optimise training 
outcomes and opportunities.  

5.6 Water Fluoridation 
The National Health and Medical Research Council have confirmed that Australian 
community water fluoridation programs are a safe, effective and ethical way of 
reducing tooth decay across the population.29  
 
Fluoridated water is the primary source of all fluoride exposure and helps reduce 
tooth decay for all, at all stages of life. Fluoridation of drinking water particularly 
benefits children, and those on lower incomes who tend to have higher rates of 
dental decay and less access to dental treatment and other forms of fluoride.30   
 
In South Australia, 92% of people have access to optimally fluoridated water.31 This 
is slightly higher than the national average of 89%, similar to other jurisdictions aside 
from Queensland and Northern Territory where the rates are less than 80% 

28 ARCPOH Website sourced 7 May 2018. 
29 National Health and Medical Research Council Public Statement 2017. Water Fluoridation and Human Health 
in Australia 
30 ibid 
31COAG Health Council Performance Monitoring Report  Baseline Report 2017 

22 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 

                                                



 
5.7 Health and Oral Health Promotion 
Oral Health Promotion is a feature across the dental sector with the private, public 
and education sectors as well as professional bodies all undertaking aspects of 
health promotion. While there are examples of collaboration across the health sector 
with regards to common risk factor approach, the integration of oral health and 
general health remains an important priority.  
 
Oral Health Promotion is included as one of the six foundation areas of the NOHP.  
The National Plan calls for five key health promotion strategies: 

  extending access to water fluoridation 
  broader use of evidence based health promotion programs  
  strengthening of nutritional and oral health messages in key settings  
  developing capacity of health community service and education workers to 

work with clients to improve their oral health 
  strengthening the focus of oral health as an integral component of general 

health, education and plans. 
It is expected these strategies will form part of the SAOHP. 

5.7.1 Tooth-brushing 
It is widely accepted and recommended that individuals brush their teeth twice daily 
with fluoridated toothpaste as an important preventive oral health factor. 
 
Evidence from a number of population based surveys including the National Child 
Oral Health Study 2012-2014, The National Survey of Adult Oral Health 2004-2006 
and more recently the Australian Dental Association Oral Health Tracker Technical 
Paper, indicate that the rate of twice daily brushing nationally for both children and 
adults is less than it should be.  This suggests there is potential to improve oral 
health by promoting effective daily self-management programs. 

6. South Australia s Oral Health Plan 2010-2017 Achievements 
The inaugural SAOHP includes 27 Strategies under 11 themes for action in the 
period 2010 to 2017. Examples of progress under each of these areas are included 
at Attachment 2. Stakeholders can include information about any areas not covered 
in this summary in their feedback.     
Some strategies have been achieved, some may remain relevant and some may not 
be relevant for the next Plan. 

23 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



7. Attachments 
 
 
 
Attachment 1 Executive Summary: Baseline report of 26 National Key 

Performance Indicators, Healthy Mouths Health Lives   
Australia s National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024. 

 
 
Attachment 2 Overview of What Has Been Achieved Under South 

Australia s Oral Health Plan 2010-2017 
 
 
 

24 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



Attachment 1 

Baseline report of 26 National Key Performance Indicators, Healthy 
Mouths Health Lives   Australia s National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024. 

 

25 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



 
 
 
 
 
 

26 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



 
 

27 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



Attachment 2 

What Has Been Achieved Under South Australia s Oral Health Plan 2010-2017 
Theme and 
Strategy 
Number 

 
Strategies To Improve Oral Health 

 
Progress/Achievements 

Progress 
Assessment 
Limited 
Some  
Substantial  

Water Fluoridation 
 
1 We will explore the potential to fluoridate the water supplies of 

the few remaining smaller centres without access to this 
important public health measure 

  All SA Water managed reticulated water supplies 
are fluoridated.   

  Roxby Downs and Coober Pedy remain un-
fluoridated. 

Limited 

Oral Health Messages for the Whole Population 
 
2 We will work with the Australian Government, other 

state/territory governments, dental professions and the tertiary 
and vocational sectors to ensure a nationally consistent set of 
oral health messages is developed and promoted 
 

  11 Key Oral Health National messages agreed 
and developed. 

  Further promotion required as part of wider health 
promotion strategies. 

Substantial 

Making Timely Dental Care more Affordable and Accessible 
 
3 We will continue to explore more flexible service delivery 

opportunities for all oral health providers aimed at enhancing 
oral health outcomes for all population groups. 

  Strong South Australian contribution into the 
National Advisory Council Report 2012.  

  Nationally the Dental Board of Australia now well 
established. 

  Oral health inequities still evident in the 
community. 

  Out of pocket expenses remain a barrier to 
people accessing dental care. 

 

Some 
4 We will work with the Australian Government to ensure that low 

income earners are able to receive regular dental check-ups 
and timely treatment 

5 We will progressively extend the visiting public dental specialist 
program to all major country centres across the state in line 
with the Country Health Plan 

28 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



  Met the requirements of two Commonwealth 
funded National Partnership Agreements relating 
to public dental care.  Implemented a third NPA in 
2017 that runs to March 2019.  
These NPA s have contributed to shorter waiting 
times and increased the volume of people treated 
substantially. 

  Waiting Times for routine general dental care 
have improved slightly from around 28,000 
people waiting 18 months in June 2010 to 25,500 
people waiting 9 months as at 31 March 2018.   

  Specialist visiting country areas   use of tele-
dentistry currently being implemented on a trial 
basis in several country areas. 

  Specialist postgraduate students are being 
scheduled to travel to several country areas to 
improve access to specialist care for country 
residents. 

  Introduction of some publicly funded specialist 
private dental schemes, particularly in country 
areas to improve access to specialist care. 

  Establishment of a public sector Special Needs 
Network to upskill community based public 
dentists to that some clients can be treated in 
their local community.  

  Established a referral pathway between the 
Migrant Health Service and SA Dental Service for 
newly arrived migrants with a refugee 
background.  

  The Homelessness and Oral Health Program 
introduced in 2011 to improve access to dental 
care for people who are homeless or at risk of 
homelessness and incorporates a mix of private 
and public dental providers.  

  Establishment of the University of Adelaide 

29 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



Outreach Dental Program which provides dental 
and other health services for people experiencing 
homelessness.  
 

  The SRF program provides support for SRF 
residents to access dental treatment which is 
provided in a timely manner and free of charge. 

  Innovation in Mental Health and Oral Health 
project implemented in 2015-2017, focused on 
building the capacity of mental health service 
providers and community pharmacists to improve 
oral health of people living with a mental health 
illness. 

Meeting the needs of older people 
 
6 We will work with general practitioners and the range of health 

professionals who interact with older people in their homes, to 
include a simple oral health screening tool in their assessment 
of their clients  needs.  This assessment will provide assistance 
to maintain oral hygiene and act as a referral pathway for 
dental treatment where needed. When these clients are eligible 
for public dental care, this treatment will be provided on a 
priority basis in collaboration with the private dental sector 

  Completed two Federal funded projects 
developing models of care and resources for 
wider application in the residential and community 
aged care sectors. 

  South Australian developed resources used in the 
national implementation of the Nursing Home 
Oral and Dental Health Plan. 

  Existing small SA Dental Service collaborative 
community and residential aged care programs 
have been sustained but not expanded.  

  No substantial traction from the aged care sector 
to implement oral health assessment, care 
planning and support for daily care. 

Limited 
 

7 We will work with the Australian Government in the 
implementation of the Nursing Home Oral and Dental Health 
Plan to ensure people in residential aged care:  
  Have an oral health assessment as part of their health 

check and care plan 
  Receive the support they need to maintain oral hygiene 
  Receive the dental treatment they need in a timely manner. 
 
 
 
 
 

30 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



Stemming the increase in dental decay among children 
 
8 We will support the implementation of the healthy eating 

guidelines created by the Department of Education and 
Children s Services for pre-school centres and schools and the 
Rite Bite Strategy for school canteens, Crunch and Sip and 
Opal to increase the use of tap water as the drink of choice and 
to encourage the consumption of nutritious foods. 

  Universal School Dental Service retained. 
Around 140,000 children enrolled for care in 
2018, slightly higher than the 134,000 enrolled in 
2010/11.  

  South Australian public and private sectors 
participated in the Child Dental Benefits 
Schedule and its predecessor the Teen Dental 
Plan Program. 

  Department of Education and Child Development 
preschools and schools encouraged to follow the 
Right Bite Healthy Food and Drink Guidelines 
which include guidelines for School Canteens. 

  SA Dental Service led the SA Crunch and Sip 
Program from 2009-2014.  

  The Crunch and Sip Program promoted Tap 
Water in schools and healthy snacks. 

  Lift the Lip Program implemented across the 
state focussing on prevention, and referral and 
promotion of early dental visits. 

  Child and Family Health Service nurses are 
trained to screen children for tooth decay and 
refer as required at scheduled Health Checks. 

  Child Care Centre workers trained to screen and 
refer children for tooth decay. 

  Dedicated team of SA Dental Service staff attend 
Child Care Centres and kindergartens to screen 
children for tooth decay and refer as required. 

  SA Dental Service staff attend the annual 
Pregnancy Babies and Children s Expo, promote 
good oral health during pregnancy, dental visits 
for pre-schoolers and to encourage parents to 
follow good dental health habits. 

Some 

9 We will work with the range of health professionals who 
interact with pregnant women and parents of young children to 
ensure that they have the information they need at key stages 
in their child s development to maintain their oral health. 
 

10 We will encourage the Australian Government to support 
medical practitioners and other health professionals to 
undertake a simple oral health assessment for young children 
from 12 months of age as part of Medicare, including referral 
for dental treatment by an oral health professional 

11 We will maintain universal access to the School Dental Service 
for all South Australians until their 18th birthday.  This will be 
supported by the new Australian Government s Medicare Teen 
Dental Program that will fund and annual check-up and 
preventive care. 

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2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



  SA Dental Service staff attend Aboriginal specific 
preschools to screen children for tooth decay as 
a priority. All Aboriginal children are offered a 
referral. 

  Oral health training for midwives at metropolitan 
and regional hospitals have received oral health 
training in pregnancy. 

 
 
 

Improving oral health for Aboriginal People 
 
12 We will work with rural Aboriginal communities to ensure that 

healthy foods, cold tap water with adequate fluoride levels where 
feasible and toothbrushes and toothpaste are available at an 
affordable price.  We will also include oral health messages in 
wider health promotion programs for Aboriginal people. 
 

  The Aboriginal Oral Health Program (AOHP) 
provides state-wide priority, free dental care for all 
eligible Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 
clients. This priority free care is embedded within 
SADS routine clinical care. Since 2005, over 
20,000 Aboriginal adult clients have accessed 
services. 

  Engage the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 
community in raising oral health awareness and 
providing information for accessing timely dental 
services through SA Dental Service clinics. 

  Integrate oral health into general health across 
Aboriginal Health services in South Australia. 

  Provide Oral Health information and support for 
rural and remote clients requiring dental care. 

  Provide services through the Aboriginal Dental 
Scheme for rural and remote clients  

  Provide Oral Health education and training for 
non-dental professionals who refer Aboriginal and 
Torres Strait Islander clients to the SA Dental 
Service. 

  Training and support for non-dental professionals 

Substantial 

13 We will progressively extend the Aboriginal Liaison Dental 
Program to the whole of South Australia in collaboration with 
Aboriginal communities. 

14 To achieve sustainable ongoing dental services for small rural 
and remote communities, we will develop targeted programs 
that take into account the unique circumstances of the 
individual communities with a focus on meeting the oral health 
needs of Aboriginal people.  The Aboriginal Cultural Respect 
Framework for SA Health will be a foundation for these 
programs and will be developed and managed in close 
collaboration with the Aboriginal Community Controlled health 
sector. 

15 We will work with the Australian Government to progressively 
expand dental programs to other small remote Aboriginal 
health service centres across South Australia based on the 
experiences of the Coober Pedy model. 
 

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2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



16 We will increase the number of Aboriginal people working in all 
areas of the oral health workforce in collaboration with the 
tertiary and vocational education sectors. 

who screen and refer Aboriginal and Torres Strait 
Islander children with early childhood caries to SA 
Dental service. 

  Support Aboriginal Client Liaison Officers working 
in the SA Dental Service clinics. 

  Provide tailored Cultural Competency training for 
SADS staff in partnership with Power Community 
Ltd. 

 
Ensuring a sustainable oral health workforce 
 
17 We will collaborate with the tertiary and vocational education 

sectors to support the clinical education of the increased 
number of dental and oral health students through the full 
range of public dental programs, including make patients, 
clinical space and staff available. Where necessary for their 
educational program, students will be able to treat fee paying 
patients in public and private dental facilities. 

  30 Year Agreement with the University of 
Adelaide in place formalising arraignments for 
student clinical placement, support models, use of 
infrastructure and establishing 2 scholarships 
annually to support rural workforce attraction and 
retention. 

  Increased number of dental providers over the 
past decade, however, there is a maldistribution 
of the workforce with the Adelaide metropolitan 
area  relatively well serviced and rural and remote 
areas relatively poorly serviced in terms of access 
to dental providers. 

  Oral health units of competency developed by the 
then Health Industry Skills Council, in 
collaboration with the dental sector, for inclusion 
in community services training packages.  The 
uptake of these units of competency into training 
programs is not known, but is not thought to be 
widespread. 

  Evaluated Building Better Oral Health 
Communities learning and teaching package for 
nurses. Available for nurse educators to 
incorporate into training material. 

  CALHN Oral Care Organisation Wide Instruction 

Some 
 

18 We will work with the Australian Government and the dental 
education sector to develop and implement a range of 
measures to attract and retain dentists and other professions 
within the oral health workforce to country South Australia.  
These measures will include expanded rural scholarships and 
placements for students. 

18 We will undertake workforce planning for all areas of dental 
specialisation to ensure that high quality and sustainable 
training programs are in place in South Australia. 

20 We will work with the tertiary education, vocational sector and 
the Community Services and Health Industry Skills Council to 
ensure that an oral health component is included in curricula of 
education programs for all health and community professionals 
 

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2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 



reviewed and updated for in patients  
  Training conducted by SA Dental Service staff for 

Child Care Centre undergraduate students 
attending TAFE. 

 
Establishing modern public dental infrastructure 
 
21 We will include dental surgeries for both the School Dental 

Service and the Community Dental Service (for eligible adults) 
in the Elizabeth, Marion, Noarlunga and Modbury GP Plus/GP 
Super-clinics and in the planning for major GP Plus Health 
Care Centres across the state. 

  New public clinics and/or significant upgrades 
of 21 clinics across the State since 2007. 

  SDS and CDS included in Elizabeth, Marion, 
Noarlunga and Modbury GP Plus/GP Super-
clinics. 

  New Adelaide Dental Hospital in partnership 
with the University of Adelaide. 

  However, a number of public clinics across the 
State have not been upgraded since they were 
established in the 1970 s and struggle to 
comply with contemporary community 
expectations about the standards of care. 

Substantial 
 
22 

Over the next seven years we will progressively upgrade the 
remaining School Dental Service clinics to bring them to the 
standard needed for modern high quality dental care. 

23 In partnership with The University of Adelaide, we will develop 
a program to progressively upgrade clinical facilities at the 
Adelaide Dental Hospital to better meet the dental service and 
dental educations needs of the state. 
 

Improving Information and Technology 
 
25 We will investigate the development of public dental ICT and 

electronic patient record systems to enhance patient access, 
improve connectivity between public and private clinical 
business systems in line with the current e-health environment. 

  Significant upgrade of software at the Adelaide 
Dental Hospital in 2018 the first stage of what is 
expected to be a three stage approach. 

  Planning for subsequent stages to occur in 
2018/19. 

Some 
 

 

34 
2018 Consultation Paper: South Australia s Oral Health Plan 


	1. Purpose   Have Your Say
	2. Introduction
	2.1 What is Oral Health?
	2.2 What Determines Oral Health?
	2.3 Funding Arrangements for Oral Health in South Australia
	2.4 The Oral Health Workforce in South Australia
	2.5 Public Dental Service Infrastructure

	3. Framework for the South Australian Oral Health Plan
	3.1 The Current National Oral Health Plan
	3.1.1 National Oral Health Plan Baseline Report
	3.2 Links with Wider SA Health Plans
	3.2.1 SA Health Strategic Plan
	3.2.2 SA Health Policy for Aboriginal Health

	4. Overview of Oral Health Status in South Australia
	4.1 Children
	4.2 Adults
	4.3 Potentially Preventable Hospitalisations

	4.4 Oral cancers
	4.5 Other Groups

	5. Programs Supporting Oral Health in South Australia
	5.1 Private Dental Sector
	5.2  Public Dental Sector   SA Dental Service
	5.2.1 Services for Children - School Dental Service
	5.2.2 General and Emergency Services for Adults - the Community Dental Service and Adelaide Dental Hospital
	5.2.3 Specialist Care - The Adelaide Dental Hospital
	5.3 Public Hospitals
	5.4 Targeted Programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People
	5.5 Academic, Education and Research Sectors
	5.5.1 University of Adelaide
	5.5.2 Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health
	5.5.3  TAFE

	5.6 Water Fluoridation
	5.7 Health and Oral Health Promotion
	5.7.1 Tooth-brushing


	6. South Australia s Oral Health Plan 2010-2017 Achievements
	7. Attachments
	Attachment 1
	Baseline report of 26 National Key Performance Indicators, Healthy Mouths Health Lives   Australia s National Oral Health Plan 2015-2024.

	Attachment 2
	What Has Been Achieved Under South Australia s Oral Health Plan 2010-2017


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