Breadcrumbs

Measles case in a child visiting metropolitan Adelaide

8 May 2018

SA Health has been notified of an overseas acquired case of measles in an 8 month old female interstate resident. The case was in the settings listed below whilst infectious and people in these settings at the specified times may have been exposed:

  • Emirates flight EK 440 travelling from Dubai and arriving in Adelaide 8:05 pm on Tues 1st May.
  • Adelaide Airport on Tues 1st May from 8:05 pm to 10:30 pm.
  • Adelaide Metro bus route 400 from Elizabeth to Salisbury, 8.30 am until 9.20 am on Wed 2nd May.
  • Adelaide Metro train route travelling from Gawler to the city, 8.50 am until 9.50 am on Wed 2nd May.
  • Commonwealth Bank, 96 King William Street Adelaide, from 9.30 am until 10.20 am on Wed 2nd May.
  • Department of Human Services, Naylor House, 191 Pulteney Street Adelaide, 9.50 am until 1.00 pm on Wed 2nd May.
  • Commonwealth Bank, 96 King William Street Adelaide, from 12.45 pm until 1.30 pm on Wed 2nd May.
  • Coles 21-39 Grote Street Adelaide, from 1.15 pm until 2.00 pm on Wed 2nd May.
  • Migrant Health Service, 21 Market Street Adelaide, from 1.40 pm until 3.15 pm on Wed 2nd May.
  • Adelaide Central Market from 2.45 pm until 3.50 pm on Wed 2nd May.
  • Adelaide Metro bus route 400 from Elizabeth to Salisbury, 2.00 pm until 3.00 pm on Fri 4th May.
  • North West Medical Centre, 1 Park Terrace, Salisbury, from 2:40 pm until 3:30 pm on Fri 4 May.
  • Adelaide Airport on Sat 5th May 2018 from 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm.
  • Qantas flight QF 585 travelling from Adelaide and arriving in Perth 3:30 pm on Sat 5th May 2018.

Measles is transmitted via respiratory aerosols that remain a risk to others for up to 30 minutes after the person has left the area. The incubation period is about 10 days (range 7 to 18 days) to the onset of prodromal symptoms and about 14 days to rash appearance. The illness is characterised by cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, a descending morbilliform rash, and fever present at the time of rash onset. The infectious period is from 24 hours prior to onset of the prodrome until 4 days after the onset of the rash. 

Doctors with patients suspected of having measles are asked to:

  • Notify urgently any patient with suspected measles to the CDCB on 1300 232 272 (24 hours/7 days). Do not wait for laboratory confirmation.
  • Arrange urgent laboratory testing through SA Pathology. Take throat swabs in viral transport medium for measles PCR (preferred specimen) and urine for measles PCR (yellow top container).
  • Isolate suspected and confirmed measles cases and exclude from child-care/ school/ workplace for at least 4 days after rash appearance.
  • Ensure all household and other contacts are protected against measles as indicated in the Australian Immunisation Handbook. http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/Handbook10-home
  • Minimise transmission of measles:
    • Examine patients suspected of having measles in their own homes wherever possible.
    • Ensure the patient is only seen by practice staff who have confirmed immunity to measles.
    • Ensure suspected cases do not use the waiting room, and conduct the consultation in a room that can be left vacant for at least 30 minutes afterwards.
    • Treat all people who attend the rooms at the same time as and up to 30 minutes after the infectious patient has left the rooms as contacts.

Measles vaccination

  • Two doses of a measles containing vaccine are highly effective at preventing measles. Offer measles vaccine (unless contraindicated, for example in pregnant women or immunosuppression) to all potentially susceptible persons who attend your practice.
  • Measles vaccine should be considered in susceptible persons prior to overseas travel.
  • Many people born in the late 1960s to mid-1980s may have only received one measles vaccine.

Further clinical information is available at www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/InfectiousDiseaseControl

For all enquires please contact the CDCB on 1300 232 272 (24 hours/7 days)

Dr Louise Flood – Acting Director, Communicable Disease Control Branch

 

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