Breadcrumbs

Transforming health update - reform for Central Adelaide

Friday 25 November 2016

Central Adelaide Local Health Network is continuing to implement Transforming Health reforms with three consultation papers released to staff and unions today.

It includes a modified proposal for the transition of rehabilitation services from Hampstead Rehabilitation Centre to The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, based on feedback from staff and user groups.
Vickie Kaminski, Interim Chief Executive, SA Health said the proposal outlines a staged process for the transition to allow suitable time for the services to adjust.

“While general rehabilitation services will continue to move as planned, we are consulting on specialised rehabilitation for brain injury and spinal cord injuries, which will likely remain at Hampstead until the next phase,” Ms Kaminski said.

“One of the key initiatives of Transforming Health is to integrate rehabilitation into the acute hospital setting, which improves patient outcomes and recovery time by allowing rehabilitation to start as soon as possible.

“Our clinicians and user groups have always acknowledged that co-location of rehabilitation within an acute hospital provides better outcomes for patients, but we acknowledge that there was initial concern about how this would be achieved.

“Over the past year we have been working closely with clinicians, allied health staff and user groups, to ensure we get the details right.

“Throughout this process, a number of alternative options were explored for accommodating the transfer of rehabilitation services.

“We also found some key themes emerging from the feedback, such as making sure there was enough therapy space for stroke patients, providing easy access to the hydrotherapy pool and increasing the number of general and disabled car parks.

“The modified plan that we are now consulting on includes solutions to these and other concerns, and outlines the staged process for how we will move the services.”

It is proposed that the majority of these services will transfer to The Queen Elizabeth Hospital to continue to care for central residents, with some general rehabilitation services transferring to Modbury Hospital to cater for residents living closer to the north and north eastern suburbs.

Acute spinal cord injury and brain injury rehabilitation services will transfer to the new Royal Adelaide Hospital. The services for patients with a brain or spinal cord injury that require specialised rehabilitation will remain at Hampstead Rehabilitation Centre until the next stage of the transition. Further stages will be subject to consultation.

Ms Kaminski said as part of this consultation we will ensure that the safety of patients and staff is not be compromised during planning for the next stage.
“Staff are also being consulted on the reconfiguration of beds across the hospital system, following the recent transfer of some services from the Central Adelaide Local Health Network to the Northern Adelaide Local Health Network,” Ms Kaminski said.

“These changes will ensure that patients in Adelaide’s north will benefit from improved care closer to home.

“Under Transforming Health we’re investing in infrastructure and realigning services so patients have greater access to the right care straight away.

“As Transforming Health initiatives are implemented and activity within the Central Adelaide Local Health Network is reduced, it provides an opportunity to reconfigure the number and arrangement of beds to better reflect current activity levels and new models of care.

“Along with providing safe, high quality health care, we also have a responsibility to ensure the organisation is operating in an efficient and sustainable manner.”

The third consultation involves a new service model to improve the flow of elderly patients through our hospitals who have finished their acute care.

Ms Kaminski said as part of this consultation we will ensure that the safety of patients and staff is not be compromised during planning for the next stage.
“Staff are also being consulted on the reconfiguration of beds across the hospital system, following the recent transfer of some services from the Central Adelaide Local Health Network to the Northern Adelaide Local Health Network,” Ms Kaminski said.

“These changes will ensure that patients in Adelaide’s north will benefit from improved care closer to home.

“Under Transforming Health we’re investing in infrastructure and realigning services so patients have greater access to the right care straight away.
“As Transforming Health initiatives are implemented and activity within the Central Adelaide Local Health Network is reduced, it provides an opportunity to reconfigure the number and arrangement of beds to better reflect current activity levels and new models of care.

“Along with providing safe, high quality health care, we also have a responsibility to ensure the organisation is operating in an efficient and sustainable manner.”

The third consultation involves a new service model to improve the flow of elderly patients through our hospitals who have finished their acute care.
Ms Kaminski said that our Care Awaiting Placement strategy will ensure patients whose medical treatment has ended, but remain in hospital only because they are awaiting placement in an aged care facility, are cared for in an appropriate environment.

“We know best practice clinical care is to discharge patients as soon as possible once their acute treatment is complete, reducing known risks of harm, such as hospital acquired infections,” Ms Kaminski said.

“Our clinicians and consumer representatives agree that the sooner a patient can return home or to community accommodation, the better their overall wellbeing.”

Each strategy will include a four week consultation period ending 23 December.

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