Breadcrumbs

Transforming Health improves quality of care

Monday 24 October 2016

South Australian patients are spending on average seven hours less in metropolitan hospitals compared to last year, despite more admissions to hospital.

SA Health Chief Executive Vickie Kaminski said the latest SA Health data indicates that patients are moving faster through the hospital system, thanks to improvements to patient care being implemented through Transforming Health.

“In 2015-16 patients were spending around 37 minutes less time in metropolitan emergency departments, compared to the previous year,” Ms Kaminski said. 

“In the north patients at the Lyell McEwin Hospital who need emergency hip fracture surgery used to wait up to 150 hours, but now many patients are waiting less than 15 hours.

“This positive trend is replicated across other metropolitan hospitals, where we’ve seen improvements that mean our patients are staying an average of 2 days less in hospital for hip fracture surgery, compared to last year.

“When it is clinically safe to do so our hospitals are undertaking procedures that were previously provided as overnight or multi-day surgery, as day cases, ensuring our patients are not in hospital for longer than they need.

“Noarlunga Hospital has undertaken 40 per cent more 23 hour surgery when compared with last year.”

In the south, the average waiting time for our patients to receive an Aged Care Assessment Team assessment was more than eight days at Flinders Medical Centre and the Repat, and five and a half days at Noarlunga.  Now, because of system improvements, almost 90 percent of these assessments are completed in less than two working days.This means patients are able to return home or to a residential facility much sooner than previously.

Ms Kaminski said clinical evidence shows that being in hospital longer than you need, can be detrimental, as there is a higher risk of getting infections the longer you stay.

“To improve health outcomes, we are changing where we provide key services, and particularly where people can get 24/7 care, so that when people arrive at hospital they get the treatment they need – without delay and without having to be moved unnecessarily,” Ms Kaminski said.

South Australian patients are spending on average seven hours less in metropolitan hospitals compared to last year, despite more admissions to hospital.

SA Health Chief Executive Vickie Kaminski said the latest SA Health data indicates that patients are moving faster through the hospital system, thanks to improvements to patient care being implemented through Transforming Health.

“In 2015-16 patients were spending around 37 minutes less time in metropolitan emergency departments, compared to the previous year,” Ms Kaminski said. 

“In the north patients at the Lyell McEwin Hospital who need emergency hip fracture surgery used to wait up to 150 hours, but now many patients are waiting less than 15 hours.

“This positive trend is replicated across other metropolitan hospitals, where we’ve seen improvements that mean our patients are staying an average of 2 days less in hospital for hip fracture surgery, compared to last year.

“When it is clinically safe to do so our hospitals are undertaking procedures that were previously provided as overnight or multi-day surgery, as day cases, ensuring our patients are not in hospital for longer than they need.

“Noarlunga Hospital has undertaken 40 per cent more 23 hour surgery when compared with last year.”

In the south, the average waiting time for our patients to receive an Aged Care Assessment Team assessment was more than eight days at Flinders Medical Centre and the Repat, and five and a half days at Noarlunga.  Now, because of system improvements, almost 90 percent of these assessments are completed in less than two working days.This means patients are able to return home or to a residential facility much sooner than previously.

Ms Kaminski said clinical evidence shows that being in hospital longer than you need, can be detrimental, as there is a higher risk of getting infections the longer you stay.

“To improve health outcomes, we are changing where we provide key services, and particularly where people can get 24/7 care, so that when people arrive at hospital they get the treatment they need – without delay and without having to be moved unnecessarily,” Ms Kaminski said.

“The data shows our patients are getting to theatre more quickly, spending much less time in hospital and therefore receiving better quality care and getting home sooner Under Transforming Health, we’re investing in infrastructure and realigning services so that patients receive the right care straight away, improving patient outcomes and efficiency across our health system.”

^ Back to top