Breadcrumbs

SA cancer rates rising among men

Thursday, 2 November 2016

More South Australian men than ever are being diagnosed with cancer, with prostate, colorectal and melanoma skin cancers the most common new cases reported.

SA Health’s Director of Prevention and Population Health, Professor Katina D’Onise said data recently released showed that 5,476 men and 4,597 women were diagnosed with cancer in 2014.

“Cancer is the leading cause of disease burden in Australia and something which has touched the lives of everyone at some point,” Professor D’Onise said.

“In South Australia, the odds of men developing cancer by the age of 75 are one in three, and for women it is a one in four risk.

“In 2014 there were 10,073 new cases of cancer diagnosed in South Australia and 3,629 deaths from cancer.

“Prostate cancer was the most commonly reported cancer in men, accounting for 25.5 per cent of all cancers, followed by colorectal cancer (12.7 per cent), melanoma of skin (9.1 per cent), lung cancer (8.5 per cent), and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (5.3 per cent).

“These five cancers accounted for more than half (61.2 per cent) of all newly diagnosed cancers among males in 2014.

“Meanwhile, breast cancer remains the most commonly reported cancer in women, accounting for 30.7 per cent of all cancers.

“This is followed by colorectal (12.5 per cent), lung (7.6 per cent), melanoma of skin (7.0 per cent) and uterus (4.9 per cent) cancers, with all five accounting for 62.8 per cent of all cancers diagnosed among females in 2014.”

Professor D’Onise said lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer death in South Australian men (20.5 per cent) and women (17 per cent).

“There are a number of risk factors associated with various cancers, including smoking, diet, sun exposure, family history and some occupational exposures,” Professor D’Onise said.

“Between 2010 and 2014 male incidence rates increased by 0.6 per cent per annum, and female rates increased by 3.4 per cent, while mortality rates in males increased by 0.2 per cent, and female rates increased by 0.4 per cent over the same time.

“It’s positive to see that state participation rates in screening programs for cancers such as bowel, breast and cervix are continuing to be strong.”

The South Australian Cancer Registry (SACR) has been collecting data on cancer incidence and mortality since 1977 and this data is included in the Cancer in South Australia 2014 Report.

This report includes cancer data for 2014 and describes the trends in cancer incidence and death in South Australia over the years 2010-2014. This information helps inform service planning, health policy, screening and treatment services, as well as identifying issues for population-specific groups.

The Cancer in South Australia 2014 Report is available on the SA Health website www.sahealth.sa.gov.au

Most common cancers in South Australian males in 2014 (new cases)

Most common cancers in South Australian males in 2014 (new cases)

Most common cancers in South Australian females in 2014 (new cases)

Most common cancers in South Australian females in 2014 (new cases)

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